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What is the linux command to kill upteen PIDs? killall is not on this system

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jan 10 '10 at 19:10

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

Kill -9 -1 From my man page:

KILL(1)                   BSD General Commands Manual                  KILL(1)

NAME
     kill -- terminate or signal a process

SYNOPSIS
     kill [-s signal_name] pid ...
     kill -l [exit_status]
     kill -signal_name pid ...
     kill -signal_number pid ...

DESCRIPTION
     The kill utility sends a signal to the processes specified by the pid operand(s).

     Only the super-user may send signals to other users' processes.

     The options are as follows:

     -s signal_name
             A symbolic signal name specifying the signal to be sent instead of the default TERM.

     -l [exit_status]
             If no operand is given, list the signal names; otherwise, write the signal name corresponding to exit_status.

     -signal_name
             A symbolic signal name specifying the signal to be sent instead of the default TERM.

     -signal_number
             A non-negative decimal integer, specifying the signal to be sent instead of the default TERM.

     The following pids have special meanings:
     -1      If superuser, broadcast the signal to all processes; otherwise broadcast to all processes belonging to the user.

     Some of the more commonly used signals:
     1       HUP (hang up)
     2       INT (interrupt)
     3       QUIT (quit)
     6       ABRT (abort)
     9       KILL (non-catchable, non-ignorable kill)
     14      ALRM (alarm clock)
     15      TERM (software termination signal)

     Some shells may provide a builtin kill command which is similar or identical to this utility.  Consult the builtin(1) manual page.

SEE ALSO
     builtin(1), csh(1), killall(1), ps(1), kill(2), sigaction(2)
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The answer you're looking for is kill. You can repeat Process IDs as necessary. As an example:

kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null &
[1] 14753
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null &
[2] 14754
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null &
[3] 14755
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null &
[4] 14756
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null &
[5] 14757
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ ps ax | grep yes
14753 pts/1    RN     0:01 yes
14754 pts/1    RN     0:01 yes
14755 pts/1    RN     0:00 yes
14756 pts/1    RN     0:00 yes
14757 pts/1    RN     0:00 yes
14759 pts/1    S+     0:00 grep yes
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ kill -15 14753 14754 14755 14756 14757
kevin@box:~/Desktop/comics$ ps ax | grep yes
14761 pts/1    S+     0:00 grep yes
[1]   Terminated              nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null
[2]   Terminated              nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null
[3]   Terminated              nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null
[4]-  Terminated              nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null
[5]+  Terminated              nice -n 19 yes > /dev/null
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