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I am using Windows 7 with the taskbar positioned at the top of my screen.

I am also using TweetDeck v 0.32.5.

When TweetDeck opens, it always positions itself to the top of the screen (not top of desktop).

Thus the title bar of TweetDeck places itself behind the windows taskbar, and I am not able to grab the title bar to move the window to where I want it (which is to the bottom of my right monitor).

Is there a way to move a window other than by dragging the taskbar? Perhaps a keyboard shortcut + arrow keys?

Other info:

  • TweetDeck does not place itself to the position is was in when last closed. (I have an unanswered feature request in with TweetDeck on this).

My current workaround is:

  • unlock my taskbar

  • drag the bottom of the taskbar down to make it 2 icons tall

  • TweetDeck responds to this event by repositioning itself just below the now "taller" taskbar.

  • After this, I make the taskbar smaller again (1 icon tall) and I regain access to the title bar so I can then move the window.

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1  
Isn't that just plain annoying? –  Jared Harley Jan 11 '10 at 21:51
    
Yep. Less so now, see answer below. –  jmsmcfrlnd Jan 11 '10 at 23:57
    
Found another way to get access to title bar of TweetDeck: since I have 2 monitors, I widen the window onto the second monitor, then grab it to pull it down out from under the taskbar. :) –  jmsmcfrlnd Jan 14 '10 at 19:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When TweetDeck is open, right-click its icon on the taskbar while pressing the Shift key.
The standard Windows system menu with "Move", "Size", "Maximize", ... will open.

alt text

Select "Move" and move the window down by pressing a few times the Down arrow.

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@Snark: Voted you up, marked as answer - you nailed it. I wanted the simplest windows command to manage this - works for me great. I really appreciate it, made my day. –  jmsmcfrlnd Jan 11 '10 at 23:29

you can use Eusing's Auto Window Manager to assign rules regarding position, transparency, etc to any program window.

Align window at position you specify. It includes top left, top center, top right, middle left, middle center, middle right, bottom left, bottom center, bottom right.

Auto Window Manager is freeware.

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One of the 2 standard answers from Molly, the other one being Total Commander! ;-) –  Snark Jan 11 '10 at 21:30
    
the difference: i'm using Total Commander, i'm NOT using Eusing's. i much prefer Actual Window Manager but it ain't free and Auto Window Manager does the job here. –  Molly7244 Jan 11 '10 at 21:59
    
@Molly, voted you up because your answer is clear and complete, and would certainly meet the needs of the type of user that is into those types of tools - I am a tool minimalist when it comes to windows. Great answer, and I am sure many will find it useful. –  jmsmcfrlnd Jan 11 '10 at 23:31

Clicking on the windows frame (as if you wanted to resize it) should move the window, so that the title bar is no longer behind the task bar.

At least this worked for SCiTE, another application that positions itself (used to?) at the top of the screen. I too filed a bug report, but it was not taken seriously by the maintainer.

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@SealedSun: Unfortunately, I was not able to reproduce your suggestion; however I do appreciate that we both have an appreciation for the difference...I read somewhere a while back that there are 2 constants one can use to set the window placement: one that gives the top of the screen (doesn't care about where task bar is) and one that gives the top of the desktop (which respects the fact that the task bar does occupy some space). –  jmsmcfrlnd Jan 11 '10 at 23:55

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