Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Some of the files I copy to a USB stick seems to be corrupted? Maybe the stick is bad but I haven't used it much and want to know for sure.

Is there a Windows utility to test the stick? Mark bad areas as bad so the file system doesn't save to them? I format before I copy but I still get corrupted files? Does chkdsk work on USB sticks reliably?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by and31415, Kevin Panko, random Aug 26 at 0:43

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking product, service, or learning material recommendations are off-topic because they become outdated quickly and attract opinion-based answers. Instead, describe your situation and the specific problem you're trying to solve. Share your research. Here are a few suggestions on how to properly ask this type of question." – and31415, Kevin Panko, random
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
now this is a much better question! –  Jeff Atwood Jan 18 '10 at 10:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

USB Flash Drive Tester allows testing of any removable media including SD, MMC, CF, USB flash pen drives for bad or unstable sectors. Especially useful for testing for fake sizes often seen on low quality USB pen drives.

USB Flash Drive Tester is freeware.

share|improve this answer
    
Having used this, I can recommend it too. –  Umber Ferrule Jul 17 '11 at 10:42

Take a look at Check Flash. This looks like what you are looking for.

Alternate link to author's site.

share|improve this answer

Under Linux (or after booting a Linux LiveCD) you can use badblocks to scan the USB stick (just like a harddisk).

share|improve this answer

CHKDSK will work just as reliably on USB flash drives as on regular hard disk drives. It will mark bad sectors as unusable and the operating system will skip them automatically.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.