IEEE 802.11 is a set of standards for implementing wireless local area network (WLAN) computer communication in the 2.4, 3.6 and 5 GHz frequency bands.

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Where did the numbers “802.11” in the wireless network standards come from?

I understand what the 802.11 specifications are, but what is the significance of those numbers?
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Why does an access point have a BSSID?

A wireless access point is a Layer-2-device (like a bridge or a switch) right? Pure Layer-2 switches (without any management capabilitis, etc.) don't have MAC-addresses. They just forward Frames ...
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How many bytes of a WLAN packet do I have to examine to extract MAC addresses?

How many bytes of a 802.11 (WLAN) packet do I have to examine to be able to extract source, destination, receiver and transmitter adress from the header? This image suggests the header length of a ...
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Is there a limit to how many separate wifi networks can successfully and securely operate within a given (building) area without interference issues?

I work for a multifamily housing developer. We build apartments. In this case, we are building a facility with about 600 beds (~220 separate housing units). The density is that of a typical apartment ...
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understanding MCS (Modulation and coding scheme) in 802.11n

the 802.11n has the htcapabilities which contains the MCS (Modulation and coding scheme). this MCS is used to calculate the MAX bite rate of Hardware depending on channels and garde interval. does ...
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802.11 Capture Frame

I am using wireshark in monitor mode to capture all the frame. I buffered all the QosData in order to calculate the biterate of each station on the network. I calculate the biterate but it is not an ...
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214 views

Why doesn't Wireshark capture management frames in promiscuous mode?

I am working with Wireshark in promiscuous mode, which is normally used to allow Wireshark to capture all the frames in the connected network. The problem is that Wireshark in this mode doesn't ...
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246 views

Why is my Wi-Fi signal degraded after upgrading Wi-Fi card?

I recently upgraded my desktop's Wi-Fi card from an Intel 6230 to the latest, greatest Intel 7260 AC. I used 5GHz 802.11n, but after the upgrade, the 5GHz band becomes unusably slow (some web pages ...
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How to tell if I'm using 802.11AC?

I have an ASUS USB-AC53 wireless adapter, with a Netgear 6300v2. The speeds are OK. There is 2 drywall walls separating the computer from the router, and only about 20ft. The signal strength and all ...
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linux-compatible 802.11ac usb-adapter chipset

Are there any 802.11 usb-chipsets that have linux drivers available? There are plenty of 802.11ac usb-adapters shipping already, but all I have seen only had windows support.
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802.11ac mixed with 802.11g devices- will this cause slowdowns?

I'm looking to upgrade to 802.11ac on my home wifi network, and have noticed that most airplay certified wireless speakers only contain 802.11g chips. Will including one or more of these 11g devices ...
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Server with WiFi interface in STA + AP mode, versus regular AP mode

I have one very small server (linux), used just as a video platform for my tablets (android and ipads). As I am usually closer with my tablet to the server itself, than to the Network Access Point, I ...
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Wireshark - Help seeing all network traffic

I have a Ralink RT3290 802.11bgn Wi-Fi Adapter and am running Windows 8. Sadly although my new computer helps in the design and testing of my touch based applications, my Network Engineering abilities ...
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Max outdoor range of WiFi [closed]

So my question is fairly simple, in a normal suburban setting (2 story buildings, no high rises, etc), what is the maximum range you could expect from a WiFi router? Preferably something faster like ...
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342 views

How do I capture 802.11 headers on an AP while not in monitor mode?

I am wondering if it is possible to extract 802.11 frames on a router running OpenWrt operating as an access point. I tried using tcpdump and loading the dumped packets in Wireshark, but I could only ...
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What's the difference between a wifi access point and station?

I noticed that my (rooted) modem has some hidden modes for wifi. It has the default(and only setting without rooting) wireless access point, but it also has the settings repeater, ad-hoc, and station. ...
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Trying to understand Wireless N vs Wireless AC [closed]

Whenever a new wireless standard gets approved you expect faster speeds and longer range. From everything that I've read about it, it seems that AC will only transfer over the 5GHz band and up to ...
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Can a 3x3 802.11n Wi-Fi router use all its capacity even if no clients support 3x3?

If I have a Wi-Fi router with 3x3 radio chains (i.e. '450mbit'), but no clients that support three streams, can I still benefit from the extra radio chain by having multiple clients? e.g. could the ...
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Is it better to use a crowded 2.4GHz Wi-Fi channel 1, 6, 11 or “unused” 3, 4, 8, or 9?

I understand that 2.4GHz Wi-Fi channels overlap, and that the most popular non-overlapping set of channels in the US is 1, 6, and 11. Generally, my signal strength on channels 1, 6, and 11 are much ...
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Strange router behavior in airodump

While auditing the security of my wireless network I decided to take a peek at what airodump-ng could display. This is what it outputs: BSSID PWR Beacons #Data #/s CH MB ENC CIPHER ...
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Is an older router (b/g only) that supports DD-WRT or Tomato better than a new n supporting device?

I'm currently looking for a new router as my current one is dying and insecure. One of it's major problems is that it stopped getting updates from the manufacturer and doesn't support WPA2. Of the two ...
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Erratic WiFi 2.4 GHz channel spikes, what gives?

Sorry guys, first a gripe about my neighbor's WiFi access point (it is related): they totally hog the center nine 2.4 GHz channels (3-11), centered right at 7! I know the outer regions of the signal ...
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Windows 7 Professional: won't associate to the closer of two APs

In my office, the network administrator has configured two separate 802.11g/n APs with the same SSID on the same channel (6) but about 50 metres apart*. The two APs are not configured as a WDS as far ...
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Why use wifi channels other than 1, 6 or 11?

Wifi channels 1, 6 and 11 do not overlap. However, any channel in between them does. e.g. channel 3 would use some of the frequency band of channel 1 & 6, and channel 9 would use some of the ...
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Dualband WiFi adapters/routers

I seem to remember reading somewhere about dualband adapters that can take advantage of specifically-configured dualband routers in order to connect on both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands simultaneously, ...
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802.1X and 802.11- can you prevent a rogue access point from the start?

Does the authentication mechanism of 802.1X assume that you have already initially connected to the trusted network? What's puzzling me is that if I set up a cloned access point to fool users into ...
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Is a rogue access point the same as a fake access point?

Is a rogue access point simply an additional access point inserted into a network? Is it distinctly different from an access point which is trying to spoof another official access point?
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Is 802.11g speed affected by slow 802.11g devices?

In general, if I have a 802.11g AP and a client is connected at a speed of 22Mbps (as seen from the AP's administrative interface), will this affect the speed/throughput of other devices connected to ...
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If there are 13 Wifi channels, can I only use 13 Wifi devices on the same room?

As wikipedia reference, 802.11 standards (which defines Wi-fi networks) tell us that wireless networks works with 13 different channels on OFDM (depending on the release, a, b, g or n). From this I ...