Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Some background Yes, ia32-libs was a stop-gap measure before true multi-arch has been implemented—basically, that package merely contained a bunch of 32-bit versions of some popular libraries. What you do now is Enable foregin architecture i386 in dpkg: dpkg --enable-architecture i386 Figure out what libraries this thingy wants and install their ...


0

No. Look at the official limits and what each version of every Windows supports: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa366778(v=vs.85).aspx


0

I've done this multiple time just for the fun of it. DO NOT DO this unless you're ok with your computer crapping out immediately or eventually. I've merged Program files, Program files x86 and both their common files, program data, the users folder, and several other system folders in every possible combination simply to see how the computer felt about it. ...


0

You can't run 64-bit executables on a 32-bit kernel: Can I run 64-bit executables on a 32-bit Linux? A poster on that thread suggested using an emulator (i.e. emulating a 32-bit architecture). This may sound a bit unhelpful, but it's usually best to go with a 64-bit install unless you have a specific need for 32 (i.e. hardware-related) as it's easier to ...


0

If you have a 32-bit OS, then you need to have 32-bit applications. The only way to get 64-bit applications to run is to run them under a 64-bit OS. BTW, it is possible to run 32-bit applications under a 64-bit OS. So the suggestion here: Find and use the 32-bit package Find the source, do a full recompilation for a 32-bit system, install and use that. ...


0

What happened, basically, is byte addressing. Prior to that there was no compelling reason to have processors have a power of two word length (though generally there were physical reasons for a multiple of 2 or 4, because circuitry came in such multiples). Prior to byte addressing the memory word was the same width as the processor word, and memory was ...


8

64 bit is the next logical step up. The reason is mainly because the step to double (or half) the number of bits is easy to handle in software and hardware for systems that operate natively in a different size. 32-bit systems where already routinely dealing with 64 bit values internally, before 64-bit CPU's became available. E.g: A 32-bit system can ...


0

If you have any Office 2010 products installed, then you'll run into an issue there. You can uninstall Office 2010 but if you are like me there are some part of Office 2010 you want to keep that doesn't come with Office 2013 (like Microsoft Office Picture Manager). If that's the case then Visio 2010 still installs if you don't need the cloud version of ...


1

Your cheapest legal option is go buy a used copy on a site like eBay (these generally are from people who bought a retail copy and have extra license keys that are unused). Obviously, buyer beware, but eBay's reputation system should help you out there. Next cheapest would be buying an OEM license (usually around $100-105).


-1

There is no simple way. Which is what you need. The simplest way would be to get a CD/DVD/Blu-Ray+-DLRW drive. A blank DVD. magic-iso to burn your image to the blank DVD. Boot from that and install as usual. Sorry But that's the factsjack


0

The Wikipedia article on the "3GB barrier" explains it pretty well. If your OS doesn't support PAE you're going to be limited to 4 GB physical address space, and that has to include both RAM and mappings of PCI device "registers" and "memory". The usual big consumer in the latter category is your video card. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3GB_barrier


0

Virtualization systems usually gain significant performance by exposing host hardware to guests system as directly as possible with minimal translation, and usually do that by installing specialized drivers on guest system, as VirtualBox Addon Packs do. The problem with your setup is that such an exposure is not possible because of different hardware setups, ...


1

run sfc /scannow check if Windows Modules Installer is set to automatic and running run "Windows System Update Readiness Tool" That worked for me on 32 bit Win7 Ultimate machine.


1

See Isaac the Boss's and my Comments. There is nothing wrong. I just needed to wait for the information to be gathered. I thought I'd leave this question up instead of trying to delete it. Maybe someone else will run into this supposedly blank window issue. Thank you to all who read and commented on this issue.


4

The answer to the question in the title is right there at the beginning of the output: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64 ELF is the Executable and Linkable Format, the binary executable file format most commonly used by Linux. x86-64 is the architecture of the binary, the 64-bit version of the x86 instruction set originally introduced by AMD. For ...



Top 50 recent answers are included