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16

You need to change the metric of the routes for the adapter. If you do 'route print' at a command prompt you should see the metrics for the various routes for your adapters. The route with the lowest metric will get used first when sending out traffic. If you go into the networking control panel and into the TCP/IP settings for your wifi adapter and then to ...


7

Yes, the three main options are: Satellite internet: good bandwidth, but usually needs a separate uplink, needs a dish, usually fairly expensive 3G / UMTS: Would work, but if you're remote, chances are you don't have 3G coverage.. worth a test though WiFi with a range extender. You can stretch WiFi for a few km with the right hardware... in case a ...


6

Yes you can. Go to Network and Sharing Center and click Manage network connections, Right click on the 3g connection and go to properties and on the advanced tab, choose Share This Connection and choose the wireless card. Next, to set up the ad-hoc connection: Simply go to Network and Sharing Center and click on Set up a connection or Network Next, ...


5

In Windows Vista: Open Network and Sharing Center Manage network connections Alt-N S (Advanced -> Advanced Settings) You can change the provider order in here, however I am not sure if it affects routing to be honest. The other option would be to bridge the two connections, but then you don't have control of which connection is being used. I did this ...


5

Yes, if you have 3G coverage you can buy a 3G router and it will act as any normal WiFi router (for example with cable access). All the clients will have internet access over 3G. My advise would be: If your friend's phone is running Android 2.2 or higher, it has a built-in WiFi hotspot function. Try using this Android hotspot function and see if you can get ...


5

No you can't, not via 3G, and if you did it would probably be illegal as the frequency bands used for 3G are most likely licensed to Telco's, and not for personal use. However, if your cellphone supports wifi, then you can set up an ad-hoc connection with it and the computer. If your phone can't do ad-hoc mode, then you can install software such as ...


5

You cannot "increase" the speed of the 3G connection that you have to more than what the service provider has installed or provided for. However, you can do the following to make use of as much of connectivity is available. Whatever you are using (USB dongle, direct modem, etc.) - attach an antenna to it. By far, this is your best bet. Try to get away from ...


5

Problem solved: Tested with another file type (.zip) on graphic-pc.com. Guess what, at the same time it's fast for this file and slow for the other one (which btw is .mp3). So that's clearly the ISP doing deep packet inspection and throttling. As for the strange results under windows, i tested again today and now it's exactly the same as linux. Also, the ...


4

Apart from the fact that you need to get your map data somewhere (i.e. over a 3G or WiFi data connection), the current answers miss the most important point: To obtain your precise location. GPS is very precise once it acquires lock on enough satellites. However, more often than not, this takes a while, especially with small receivers or in a city (where ...


4

You can't do this, you can't just replicate a 3G signal. The 3G signal is encrypted with a routing encryption and decrypted by your phone. Besides it being non-existant for consumers, your provider uses broadcasting frequencies that are restricted for other devices so even if such a device would be made, it would be illegal. Doesn't your phone have Wi-Fi ...


4

NO and it depends on request* . *This Features and specifications are subject to change without prior notification. Reference


3

How to change the binding order of network adapters in Windows XP and in Windows 2000 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894564) It's useful also when you want to decide weather your VPN connection should be the first or not.


3

You could try a cellphone signal booster. Here is an article and installation tutorial on ThinkGeek.com: Dual Band Cellphone Signalboost Extender This Dual Band Cellphone Signalboost Extender has a frequency range of 824-894 MHz / 1850-1990 MHz and boosts phone coverage from any cellphone provider in the USA except for Iden and Nextel. Plus ...


3

As the GSM operator assigned you the public IP you should ensure that you enabled the firewall on your connection. In linux the firewall is based on netfilter(iptables). Most distributions have GUI to set it up. However, if you miss it you can set the minimal set of rules manually: $ iptables -A INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT $ ...


3

Step by step instructions: 1. Go to Control Panel > Network Connections (In classic view). You should have two connections, one is your network card, the other your 3G modem. At this point, you can run the Network Setup Wizard by choosing Set up a home of small office network. Internet Gateway is an option here: If you want to proceed manually without ...


3

This is possible through link aggregation or bandwidth bonding, but it's very difficult to achieve with low-end hardware, and also probably expensive. The DD-WRT router firmware has some support for bonding here: http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Bonding You would need to buy something like a CradlePoint device to convert your 3G dongle to ethernet, so ...


3

I'm using Menu Meter. MenuMeters is a set of CPU, memory, disk, and network monitoring tools for Mac OS X. Although there are numerous other programs which do the same thing, none had quite the feature set I was looking for. Most were windows that sat in a corner or on the desktop, which are inevitably obscured by document windows on a laptop's ...


3

Your symptoms sound like a caching issue. Are you using a card or are you tethering wirelessly to your cell phone? Either your provider's caching server isn't doing a very good job, or some other device in your LAN -- a modem, router, or firewall -- is having problems. (Do you have any such devices? If so, remove them and see if the issue disappears. Also ...


3

You could, but it will not be as straightforward as it seems. Each USB dongles creates its own network, and it will have its own external IP address. You would then need to route calls to one interface or to the other, according to some rules, which you would need to create. For simple cases, it could be OK: you could route everything that goes to your ...


3

Assuming that this issue is because windows prefers the WiFi interface over the 3G Interface, then you might need to manually raise the metric of the WiFi interface, so that Windows will not prefer it as the default interface for internet access. Check : How to select default network interface for internet? Check windows site : ...


2

The MTU is defined per media protocol, and in the case of wireless networks leave a lot of leeway to the specific implementation. This is because a large MTU facilitates quicker transfer of a given amount data due to lower combined overhead, whilst also rapidly loosing in efficiency vs a small MTU if the link is poor and data often has to be retransmitted. ...


2

In situations like this I usually use static routing towards the company sites, and use the alternative connection as default gateway. Was a while since I did this on Windows so my apologies if the syntax is not 100% correct. List your current routes, just for reference. print route Syntax for add a new static route, gateway is the key here. Use the ...


2

An antenna, by itself, can't magically create gain. The gain is mainly dependent on the shape of the antenna, and the surface area (how big it is). Consider the difference between two antennas: an ordinary omnidirectional one (broadcasts and receives in a nearly perfect sphere), and a highly directional one, such as a Yagi. Omnidirectional: Yagi: The ...


2

Hyper-V does not accept wireless adapters, and this "by design". To force Hyper-V to accept a wireless network adapter, one must use the old trick of camouflaging it as a dummy but acceptable virtual adapter which is bridged to the dongle adapter. Below is described how to bridge your dongle network adapter with a virtual network adapter on the host ...


2

I believe the Novatel MiFi will do what you require. Wonderful device. http://www.anandtech.com/show/4500/novatel-wireless-mifi-4510l-review-the-best-4g-lte-wifi-hotspot Available in 4G on both Sprint and Verizon. Virgin Mobile also has one I believe (uses the sprint network), but I think they throttle the speeds. Not entirely sure.


2

I guess it should be possible to share the connection over LAN, and then use the router as a WiFi access point for the other devices. Set up the router You will not use the router to connect to a modem, but it will rather just "share" the shared internet connection. First, you need to access the router's settings. Consider your router's manual to see ...


2

3G is needs a good signal and in patchy areas your packets will get lost, and will need to resend and acknowledge.. that is the main problem of it slowing down and then speeding up again. You can solve your problem by using a GSM/CDMA/3G/HSDPA Amplifier 3G Amplifier There are other ones out there, but these a pretty cheap.. they used to cost about ...


2

Vista supports only one internet connection, and in addition has the annoying habit of always preferring wired connections over non-wired, on the supposition that they are faster (have better metric). See this article for a solution with many screenshots : "Windows Vista Multiple Networks: Wireless To Public WIFI and Wired To Private LAN". The basic ...


2

Windows Update constantly changes its IP address, so you'd have to block out a massive range of IPs to prevent it. If your firewall supports DNS blocking, block out these hosts: http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com http://*.windowsupdate.microsoft.com https://*.windowsupdate.microsoft.com http://*.update.microsoft.com https://*.update.microsoft.com ...



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