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Although 802.11ac is a 5GHz-only technology, I have yet to see an 802.11ac router that only supports 5GHz. All the 802.11ac routers on the market are simultaneous dual-band, so they do a/n/ac in 5GHz at the same time as b/g/n in 2.4GHz. So go ahead and buy a simultaneous dual-band 802.11ac router, and your 802.11g NIC will see the router's 2.4GHz b/g/n ...


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You can think of it this way. 100% of the time is available. If a 300Mbps link is transferring 150Mbps, it's in use half the time, leaving half the time available for other connections. But I should warn you that advertised speeds are maximum links speeds. Real world link speeds are much lower. In addition, the bandwidth has to be divided between inbound ...


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802.11ac typically carries 1300 Mbps on each 5 GHz radio so you should not hit a threshold at only 300Mpbs, that assuming you meant 300mbps, not 300 MBps


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For the Internet, I have to agree with RAMHound that those speeds are about normal. Wireless has a lot more overhead so actual transfer rates are much lower than the spec. One thought though is the wireless speeds look about right for the original (draft) 150 Mbit 802.11 N. If you only upgraded the router/AP to 300N then you probably have the 150N cards in ...


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I recently resolved issues (dropouts, slow speed, etc) with my 802.11n wireless network by switching to one of the newer 'beamforming' routers. Since switching, everything is stable and fast now. :) I was previously using a good quality Linksys router, but it couldn't handle the interference from multiple nearby devices and walls, etc. Switching to a ...



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