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7

I posted this before but can't seem to find it. I would advise that if you can't get a device that supports bridging or repeating, the easiest thing you can do is to get a second wifi router and disable DHCP on it, then plug it in via ethernet to the primary router (make sure it is plugged in through a normal socket and not the router interface if it has ...


6

Water can pose a lot of resistance for RF signals. Here's a technical document the explains this is great detail, which you might find interesting since it's relevant:   Underwater Radio Communication, by Lloyd Butler VK5BR (1987)   http://www.qsl.net/vk5br/UwaterComms.htm These two quotes from that article address your question: "Water in its ...


5

Those 15-20 megabit/sec throughputs you're seeing are fine for 802.11g, which is what (unbeknownst to you) you're actually configured to use here. The IEEE 802.11n spec requires that you do WPA2 (AES-CCMP) or no security, and it requires that you do QoS (WMM). You've blocked yourself from doing 802.11n by doing TKIP-only and disabling WMM. Also, by setting ...


4

Change your band from b+g+n to strict N. Otherwise it will be in protective mode and you'll never see the full N / MIMO speed. This requires your clients to be N and support MIMO, but you knew that.


4

Either connect to the point, and do iwconfig | grep "Access Point" or find your access point in the output of iwlist wlan0 scan (if you have wireless interface called not wlan0, substitute appropriately).


4

A wireless access point is a device that allows wireless devices to connect to a wired network using Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or related standards. It is basically just a source for wireless Internet connections. The pure definition for an access point is distinct from that of a router : A router will also give such services as NAT routing, DHCP client/server, ...


3

As Chris S said, you will need to use the hostapd daemon. There is one major caveat though; your wireless card must support "Master" mode in order to act like an access point. A somewhat current compatibility list is available here: http://hostap.epitest.fi/hostapd/


3

Yes you can use any repeater. While configuring the repeater, you'll have to wire it to your computer and probably access a web interface on the repeater (the default IP should be in the booklet) Then, you can scan networks, find yours, put in the password and there you go, it'll extend your wireless network ! Your material doesn't have to be from the same ...


3

For anyone else facing this problem, the problem was with mac address. I started the access point interface, gave it a mac address. Then after running hostapd, added the station interface, gave it a different mac address and connected it to the network and gave the station's ip address as the default gateway of the clients through dnsmasq. Now everything ...


2

It sounds like what you're trying to achieve is wireless bridging, where you're connecting two networks via wireless instead of via physical cable. Generally speaking, putting two routers on the same SSID doesn't make them function on the same network inherently. Your routers must explicitly support wireless bridging to take advantage of it, otherwise, ...


2

I find that some newer devices need wpa=2 rather than wpa=3. '3' should be both WPA and WPA2 but the probe response doesn't seem to contain the RSN IE when wpa=3. So if the device doesn't like WPA then it won't connect. Cheers, Steven


2

Setup a dummy network 1 Open the console su - 2 See if you have a dummy driver modprobe -l | grep /net/dummy.ko (!) If you do not have a dummy driver, go to "Create kernel module". 3 Load dummy driver modprobe dummy (!) Do not add it to startup if it fails. 4 Test dummy0 by putting it up ifconfig dummy0 10.246.75.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 ...


2

Rogue access points are setup by rogues; e.g., they are malicious. Fake access points are not the real access point for whatever reason; e.g., set up by a rogue or by an administrator as a honeypot.


2

If the router has both WAN and LAN ethernet ports, you can usually disable DHCP in the router and change the configuration to move the wireless router's network configuration to some unused IP range, then plug your network into the LAN side of the router and nothing into the WAN side to make a poor man's access point. Wireless clients will connect to the ...


2

I'm too late on the scene to be helpful to the OP, but I had similar problems that stopped me from getting my Edimax EW-7416APn v2 AP in universal repeater mode working, and hopefully some of that experience will be useful to others. The Edimax AP manual was indeed very poor, but Edimax have now posted an extra manual specifically for UR setup on their ...


2

Look for a wifi extender. You can get them from newegg and other vendors. Apple's Airports have this ability as well.


2

The manual states: In the factory default configuration, the access point is configured as a DHCP client. If the access point fails to obtain an IP address from the DHCP server, its IP address defaults to 192.168.1.1. So it should grab a DHCP address from your home router assuming it is connected via an ethernet cable to the home router and then ...


2

Not familiar with tablets running Win8 personally, but on a computer/laptop running Windows8, you can provide an "Alternate Configuration" that will be used if DHCP fails. If available, this is a separate tab on the same window where you would be changing from DHCP to static and back. All you need to do is enter your static IP information on the "Alternate ...


1

If you extend it using a second router, be sure to set that router to "bridged" mode. This turns of DHCP and allows machines connected to the second router to be on the same network segment as machines connected to the first router. Also set the channels to a different value on each router. The best choice (assuming the are not already in use in your ...


1

You can extend you coverage by using a WDS link from your existing AP to a second AP downstairs. This is not the best way as you cut your throughput in half with every hop. To get full throughput the best way is to use a dual radio box that has one radio catching the "backhaul" signal and the second transmitting. You can also add a more powerful ...


1

Use the arping utility with your AP's IP as an argument: $ arping 192.168.0.1 ARPING 192.168.0.1 from 192.168.0.200 eth0 Unicast reply from 192.168.0.1 [00:48:6C:38:B7:4D] 0.660ms Unicast reply from 192.168.0.1 [00:48:6C:38:B7:4D] 0.590ms Unicast reply from 192.168.0.1 [00:48:6C:38:B7:4D] 0.610ms Unicast reply from 192.168.0.1 [00:48:6C:38:B7:4D] ...


1

If I recall correct from my college years. This happens because of two attributes of water.. First as it has mass it is a natural obstacle and so the RF cannot pass through it as if it was air. but the most interesting thing is that its reflective nature doesn't help the signal, because of its not still surface. This happens because lets say you send the ...


1

Whether or not you can depends on hardware support in the wireless device. Access Point operation is more than just software. You'll need to check the specific chipset of your wireless nic to see if ap mode is supported at all.. If it is, then you can explore how to do that. I believe I've seen the little network gui in Ubuntu Linux provide an interface for ...


1

I found the Wasacom website that outlines details. Yes, it's in Spanish, but Chrome translated the important part for me: mode access point is to mount an ad-hoc network is not a generic AP Which in poor-English translation means you can link to another wifi device broadcasting an SSID, but it seems it can't independently broadcast.


1

First of all, if you can just take it back to the store and get an access point. That being said, all you should have to do here is disable DHCP on the WRT160 and give the device a static IP address in the same subnet. If it want's a default route it should be the IP of your other router. You should have a cable from one of the LAN ports of your existing ...


1

You can do this - as long as the wireless type/protocol is the same (eg both are .b or both are .n) One problem you will find is that while you can add repeaters, each one effectively halves bandwidth.


1

Create virtual interface Create ifcfg-wlan0:0 file nano /etc/sysconfig/network/ifcfg-wlan0:0 Add to ifcfg-wlan0:0 file: DEVICE=wlan0:0 # Configuration for wlan0:0 ONBOOT=yes # This line ensures that the interface will be brought up during boot. BOOTPROTO=static # wlan0:0 - This is the main IP address that will be used for most outbound connections. # ...


1

Did you manage to solve this? In case it's helpful, I've found a partial solution. The utility WirelessMon - http://www.passmark.com/products/wirelessmonitor.htm It allows you to override Windows wifi selection, and explicitly connect to an AP by MAC address. I had the highly frustrating problem of needing to use a public hotspot network with a portal ...


1

You've said the solution in your question, if the current AP device is inferior, you need a new, proper AP. While asymmetric device communication is theoretically a problem with wireless (think of when your cellphone gets full bars, but the tower can't hear your phone... no connection), I don't think I've ever seen that problem with WiFi. The AP's antenna ...



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