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17

In wireless networking, Ad-Hoc is one of the modes of operation for an 802.11 radio. It happens at OSI layer 1, the physical layer, and it basically means that all devices can communicate directly to any other device that is within radio range. Normally, in Infrastructure mode, wireless devices can only communicate with a central Access Point or Router and ...


6

I had the same problem like you and finally found a solution: The Problem is, that you need a special ad-hoc profile to connect to the network. For some weird reason you can't do that via gui anymore, but you can work direct with netsh wlan: Create a new profile via gui (new connection in the nework center) Choose "connect manual with a network" Type in ...


5

Here is a page documenting setting up an ad-hoc access point.


5

Here is how to disable ad hoc networks on Vista, It should work on W7 as well http://www.windowsnetworking.com/kbase/WindowsTips/WindowsVista/AdminTips/Security/HowtoDisableAdHocWirelessConnectionsonVista.html Windows Vista won’t automatically create ad hoc wireless connections with other computers, but for greater security you may want to disable ad-...


5

Because ad-hoc connection protocol is simpler than access-point connection (via router). In ad-hoc case you have only two entities that talk to each other, while in access-point case there can be many entities and protocol has more overhead to be able to handle that. This overhead is still present even if only two computers connect. Another reason is that ...


5

To view connected clients use command line @echo off netsh wlan show hostednetwork | findstr -i status echo SSID Name netsh wlan show hostednetwork | findstr -i " ssid " netsh wlan show hostednetwork setting=security echo Connected clients arp -a | findstr -i 192.168.173 | findstr /V 255 | findstr /V 192.168.173.1 For bandwith control you can use ...


4

In principle, the Personal Area Networking (PAN) Bluetooth profile allows this. PAN basically gives you a LAN over Bluetooth, so software on your PC and on your phone can talk to each other as if they were on a LAN. However, to actually use your PC's net connection on the phone, your phone (or more precisely, the apps on your phone that you want to provide ...


4

Try Connectify which is a third-party solution, you should be able to come around with the Lite features. Transform your Windows laptop into a Wi-Fi hotspot at the click of a button so you can share a single Internet connection with your friends, co-workers, and mobile devices. Otherwise, try to see if you can use netsh to set up an ad-hoc ...


3

The iPod touch requires a WiFi access point. If you don't have a WiFi router, you won't be able to do it. UPDATE: If you're using a laptop and it has WiFi, you could share your dial-up connection that way. Here is a tutorial.


3

Make sure your wireless network card is turned on. Go in to the "Network and Sharing Center", and on the left click "Manage Wireless Networks", from here click the add button and "Ad-Hoc network" should be one of the options. However, if your Wireless is on, you should be able to get to it from the screen you were on - If it isn't there, it is possible ...


3

This Ubuntu wiki page explains everything.


3

Use Connectify. It should fit your bill.


3

You (and likely also whoever is telling you this) are confused. The only difference between an ad-hoc network and a "typical" wireless network is the context and terminology. I could set up an "ad-hoc" network from my iMac that shared an internet connection wirelessly, and it would be functionally identical to the same set-up with a router. For all I know, ...


3

This depends on the exact hardware, but the odds are strongly in favor of 'no'. Almost all wireless adapters only support a single concurrent connection; this would require two (one for the normal network, one for the ad-hoc network). You could add a second wireless adapter, though.


3

Finally figured it out. The problem was caused by the Atheros AR9285 adapter - its 802.11n capability was locked, and after using the Atheros EEPROM Tool to unlock it, the connection speed increased to 65 Mbps. The AR9285 can run at 150 Mbps on a 40 Mhz channel though, so if anybody knows how to make a Wireless Hosted Network / software AP use a wide channel,...


3

A true "Ad-Hoc" network would not include networking infrastructure, like routers, etc. If I'm following your question, you have a wireless Ad-hoc network setup, and you are using a machine to share an Internet connection with them (the "other pages" you speak of). This means you have an Ad-Hoc network, and a bridge to another network (the Internet). It ...


3

If two machines are on the same IP network, they can communicate with each other without any routing, and without needing the internet. So you just need a series of Wifi APs that form a single IP network. You can do this by making your dorm AP the primary, then use a Repeater Bridge for each subsequent AP. If you use a dd-wrt compatible wireless AP, then ...


3

What many Wi-Fi products refer to as an "ad hoc" network is what the 802.11 spec refers to as an IBSS. It's important to note that the originator of an IBSS does not control it at all. Once one or more additional devices join the IBSS, all devices in the IBSS are completely equal peers, and they all participate in maintaining the network, even after other ...


3

This is a Starter edition of Windows 7 and, according to Microsoft: Ad hoc networking. A computer running Windows 7 Starter can't create an ad hoc network (also called a computer-to-computer network), but it can be part of an ad hoc network. Ad hoc networks are often used for a specific purpose, such as playing a multiplayer computer game. ...


3

The ability to change the channel is a function of the wifi adapter driver. Some can, some can't. If yours can, you'll find it in the wifi adapter properties. Press the Windows logo and "R" keys simultaneously to display the "Run" dialog box. Type "devmgmt.msc" without quotation marks into the box and press "Enter." The Windows device manager will ...


3

When installing the Windows drivers for the Atheros device, the INF file may not have included Ad Hoc channel selection capability even though the wifi card is capable. Look for 'defaultIbssChannel' examples in the INF file. You can then add this new parameter by using 'regedit' and add to the existing parameters that are available to the wifi card. Look in:...


2

Yes, you just have to bridge the connections for wireless A->B and wired A>C. I assume machine A has wired and wireless network connections. This is very simple to do in windows. You can just select the two network interfaces and "bridge" the connections.


2

IBSS networks (which is what people usually mean by ad-hoc networks) do not do forwarding. For that, you need a mesh network (like 802.11s, which is still a draft standard).


2

There should be no difference in connecting the third as from the second. When you first create the network, it should be broadcasting the SSID and if you connect, it should ask for a passkey. If it isn't working, try again. Sometimes I have found that some laptops go funny and it is easier to start the ad-hoc for a different one - in theory it shouldn't ...


2

What you want is an Ad-Hoc Network.


2

The wireless network structure that you describe is called ad-hoc, which is the mode for wireless devices to directly communicate with each other. The alternative when using a router is called infrastructure mode. For most manufacturers of wireless adapters, 802.11n is only possible in infrastructure mode, which requires a router. Without a router, you won'...


2

Your wireless router probably has a setting on the initial setup screen for PPoE connections which is what you need to get the router to login to the service for you then you can share the internet connection. Your router probably has DHCP for the current WAN setting. Change it to PPoE and you will get a place to put your login ID and password and have the ...


2

You should tick the sharing box on the other Network (Ad-Hoc BLAM) instead of in the vodafone Network.


2

Have you tried inSSIDer? inSSIDer From that link: What's Unique about inSSIDer? Compatible with Windows XP, Vista and 7 (32 and 64-bit) Uses the Native Wi-Fi API and your current Wireless network card Sort results by Mac Address, SSID, Channel, RSSI and "Time Last Seen" Compatible with most GPS devices (NMEA v2.3 and higher) How can ...



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