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The easiest and quickest solution that follows your method, is by starting the command prompt as follows: Press win to open the start menu. Type in cmd to search for Command Prompt. Press ctrl+shift+enter to launch Command Prompt as administrator. This works from Windows 7 and up. win+r does not natively support this though, but an alternative (and less ...


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It is the operating system that mediates access to files based on permissions. If someone else has access to your hard disk, they can access any of the files that aren't encrypted. Permissions themselves do not do anything to prevent access to files, they just indicate to the operating system which accounts should be able to view the files. The OS can ...


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He could use a livecd or linux install that completely ignores windows file permissions. You could do it with another windows box but this would get messy depending on what he's doing. In any case getting around a password or changing it is trivial if you know what you're doing. Its even possible to copy out the file where the password is encoded and to ...


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No. Accounts can be modified by the usermod command (for example for changing your username you'll run usermod -l new_name current_name) which can be run only by superuser. Also, you shouldn't be logged in when changing your username. Actually, you probably even can't be logged in, since usermod will fail if any process is run under your username. EDIT: ...


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No, and also proactive actions may not be appreciated by the IT guy (maybe there's dependent apps or documentation to be filled) so I'd encourage you to ask them.


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You cannot edit this User Rights Assignment policy because this setting is being managed by a domain-based Group Policy. In this case, the domain Group Policy setting has precedence and you are prevented from modifying the policy via Local Group Policy. To modify this policy, either: Modify the policy in the applicable domain Group Policy Object. Prevent ...


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The issue is a permissions issue. You have a few options. The one most would accept as proper would be to move where you are pulling the files to. Even admin accounts are treated as regular user accounts unless the program has been elevated. So I would suggest moving the files from Program Files to somewhere else. Maybe C:\ProgramData or C:\Git. The other ...


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This is not possible, if you could do that, the whole Windows security system would be useless. As soon as the user has access to the first elevated process, he could start many other elevated processes and do anything on the machine. The whole point of being a standard user is to not be able to do certain things. Just keep your elevated command line open ...


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Another fast way is to use Windows+X then hit A. However I marked the other answer as the correct one because the question originally asked for a way to do that through Windows+R



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