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40

It's not the length (100 meters -approximately 330 feet- is the max for ethernet UTP), but most likely the quality of the cable is bad. Maybe the cable is damaged internally or at some point was pinched severely. This is not always visible from the outside. Could also be that one or both ot the RJ45 connectors is crimped on badly or is incorrectly wired. ...


16

When I first read this I thought it didn't make sense because something cannot 'intrude' in a kernel. However Googling it I found similar posts (which also give the answer), but also list that the message was something like: kernel: Intrusion detected from ... which means something quite different. The kernel (software) on your router is letting you ...


13

Short answer: yes. Suppose an ISP has 100 megabits to the internet. They might have 100 customers, each with 2 Mbps each. They are assuming that all 100 customers will not use that 2 Mbps at once. They may even use devices to "shape" the traffic to make it so everyone gets a fair share if everyone tries to use their max speed at once. Also, 2 Mbps is ...


12

VDSL is not compatible in any way with ADSL. VDSL2 capable line cards (the ISP end) are compatible with ADSL2+ ADSL2 and ADSL - so you can use these modems on a VSDL2+ connection - Its easier to find on this juniper networks document, as well as this broadbad-forum presentation - i am unclear if its possible to use a VDSL2 modem with an ADSL connection ...


6

They are not saying that you will get to enjoy 2Mbps of bandwidth between your computer and your favorite website. The speed that is advertised is the speed between you and your ISP. There are dozens of variables that will control/limit your speed to "the Internet". Some variables: Route of traffic to remote site Response of Remote server In many cases ...


5

First, you should install DynDNS client if your router does not support it. Second, you need to forward port 80 to the server machine. You should not be able to link to your router from the Internet ("the outside") as this would be a security hole. Do you really need to configure it from outside? I doubt it. If you do, you should be able to set this in the ...


5

Try these commands from the command line: nslookup bbc.co.uk ping bbc.co.uk telnet bbc.co.uk 80 The first command checks whether your computer can resolve the name. The second command checks whether the routing is set up correctly (i.e. packets can travel between your computer and the server). Note that not all servers allow ping. If in doubt, try with ...


5

What you're doing makes no sense - stop it now. The RJ11 port, on either box, is for the DSL link ONLY, it connects via your filter to your phone line and then onto the DSLAM using PPOA - it has nothing to do with ethernet ok. You simply need to connect your machines together via IP and configure them to route between each other - if you can't do this then ...


5

He left it for a reason. They are dirt cheap, have no user-serviceable parts and, therefore, are virtually worthless to fix. Your router doesn't have to fall or be be "electrocuted" to go bad. Normal household power glitches can damage it. The data or power connectors can come loose internally. Overheating can cause any of the electrical components to stop ...


5

The issue is the number of feet of telephone wire from your jack to the central office. Even homes a block or two away can differ by thousands of feet of wire. For example, ADLS2+ typically achieves speeds of up to 20Mbps through half a mile of wire (1Km). Bump that up to 2.5 miles (4Km) and you're down to 2Mbps. If there's sufficient demand, they can add ...


5

I have had a cable of 30M be faulty, and a cable tester (albeit a cheap one) showed it as OK / didn't detect a fault. It may be that longer cables can be trodden on and that makes them less reliable(by damaging them). The kind of ethernet cables that I find to be reliable, have been one with a rugged jacket, they are expensive, and maybe a better quality ...


5

PPPoE clients use PPPoE Active Discovery to discover PPPoE Access Concentrators (servers) on the network. The first packet the client transmits is a PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation (PADI) which is sent to the Ethernet broadcast address (all ones in binary, all f's in hex: ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff). And PPPoE ACs on the network respond with PADO's (Offers). The ...


5

Your line runs between a pair on the MDF (main distribution frame) at the central office and a box on the street, which then connects to the NID at your home. There are OE and CP blocks on the frame (OE=office equipment or the phone switch, and CP=cable pair, or out to the street) that connect between your pair and the phone equipment. When DSL is installed, ...


4

It could be that you are using an incorrect category cable. You didn't mention what speed you are using. Here is a link to Cisco's explanation of cable types. At a minimum you should be using CAT 5 cable, this gives minimum error rate for 100BT and lower. With Gig-E widely available, CAT 6 cable is needed for the length run you state. ...


4

You need to buy either: A) standalone ASDL modem to plug into your existing router. B) A combined ASDL modem-router. (Which you can check beforehand if it supports DD-WRT) Also, lay off the question marks a bit ;)


4

You don't have a choice. I'm pretty sure you can't even buy a plain bridging-only DSL modem today. Almost all DSL modems will support PPPoA or PPPoE, and they never support bridging over PPP*, so if you had any of the PPP* modes enabled, it would be, at the very least, doing one-address NAT gatewaying, not plain bridging. The standard for plain bridging ...


4

Electrically its unlikely - the connectors on the standard ethernet jacks are recessed and are unlikely to make contact with anything. Tripping on it and falling (or the system dropping) on the other hand, can potentially be quite catastrophic


4

You have to request a static IP address from your ISP - they will walk you through configuring you ADSL modem. You will have to pay extra for the privilege, though.


4

Not all ADSL modems are created equal. Here in the UK it is well worthwhile getting a modem based on an Alcatel chipset if British Telecom is your local loop supplier. Why? Because if you have a fault and your ISP gets a BT engineer to call around, they will plug in their own Alcatel based modem and if it works, you will be charged for wasting the engineers ...


3

Any possibility that your ISP could be using transparent proxies to route web traffic? I've a WiMAX connection where this happens. The web traffic is routed through a web proxy at the ISP's end. I get slow speeds when browsing, but fast speeds when using any other services. I have started using an SSH tunnel to re-route my web traffic, and sure enough, have ...


3

I'm not sure why your service was slow, but it's possible that not having the router on all the time to talk to the service provider caused an error on their side. I would say leave it on. Routers don't use up much power. They use less than 1/10th of the power a typical computer uses while it's running. It doesn't amount to much. Here's some data: "My ...


3

Brief You want the Line Attenuation as low as possible and the Signal to Noise Margin as high as possible. A signal-noise margin of less than ~8dB may be problematic. Attenuation of above about ~40dB will probably start to limit your speed. Line Attenuation Attenuation is how much power / "volume" of the signal is lost between your router and the ...


3

You'll need three numbers: "Anschlusskennung" (always 12 digits), "Teilnehmernummer" (12 or less digits) and "Mitbenutzerkennung" (4 digits) and your password. Example Data: Anschlusskennung: 111111111111 Teilnehmernummer: 222222222222 (12 digits) or 33333333333 (11 digits) Mitbenutzerkennung: 0001 Example 1 (Teilnehmernummer with 12 digits): ...


3

Or move to Korea, Japan, Holland or Scandinavia, where symetric fiber with 100/100mbit is getting very common today.


3

The Netgear Router itself is a much better firewall than your PC. Also, depending on the model, it might also do Access Policy. Logon to it according to the instructions you received with it, and search for such options. Otherwise, if you control PC2, just install some parental control software on it, for example K9 Web Protection.


3

Ok, so here is a rundown on VoIP. VoIP uses UDP for its audio stream, meaning that there is no checking to see that packets are in the correct order or even there at all, so whatever happens to arrive in whatever order is what you hear. Common issues with voip call quality: Latency - high latency will often cause a delay in audio. Jumps in latency, ...


3

Is the firmware up to date? Do you do much torrenting? They often reboot when they overflow the address space which torrents can do. There are a lot of discussions about Billions at Whirlpool which may be able to help/ Billions are pretty tetchy with noisy power. I had a problem with one every time I plugged and external HDD in. It turns out the HDD's power ...


3

Didn't realise that the rates you were giving were sync rates as opposed to transfer rates :) Thats pretty poor alright. Sounds like your line isn't able to handle whatever profile is set. I'd imagine that the reason the upstream isn't affected is probably because its on a different bandwidth to the downstream. Get in touch with your ISP and ask them to ...


3

I have done this before with 2 4MB ADSL lines, however have never been able to get them to bond. PFSense is a BSD based firewall router that has built in support for multiple ADSL lines in a load balanced environment. There is also various dual ADSL routers available. These will provide you similar solutions. Molly already provided a link to one that can. ...



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