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40

It's not the length (100 meters -approximately 330 feet- is the max for ethernet UTP), but most likely the quality of the cable is bad. Maybe the cable is damaged internally or at some point was pinched severely. This is not always visible from the outside. Could also be that one or both ot the RJ45 connectors is crimped on badly or is incorrectly wired. ...


33

No. You need to configure so the routers have different IPs. Preferable, you assign 192.168.0.1 to the Virgin router, and 192.168.0.2 to the Sky router. This you do with the Sky router disconnected from the Virgin router, via a wireless client. Also, you need to turn off the DHCP server on the Sky router. Then connect the Sky router from LAN port to LAN port ...


18

When I first read this I thought it didn't make sense because something cannot 'intrude' in a kernel. However Googling it I found similar posts (which also give the answer), but also list that the message was something like: kernel: Intrusion detected from ... which means something quite different. The kernel (software) on your router is letting you ...


13

Short answer: yes. Suppose an ISP has 100 megabits to the internet. They might have 100 customers, each with 2 Mbps each. They are assuming that all 100 customers will not use that 2 Mbps at once. They may even use devices to "shape" the traffic to make it so everyone gets a fair share if everyone tries to use their max speed at once. Also, 2 Mbps is ...


12

VDSL is not compatible in any way with ADSL. VDSL2 capable line cards (the ISP end) are compatible with ADSL2+ ADSL2 and ADSL - so you can use these modems on a VSDL2+ connection - Its easier to find on this juniper networks document, as well as this broadbad-forum presentation - i am unclear if its possible to use a VDSL2 modem with an ADSL connection ...


6

They are not saying that you will get to enjoy 2Mbps of bandwidth between your computer and your favorite website. The speed that is advertised is the speed between you and your ISP. There are dozens of variables that will control/limit your speed to "the Internet". Some variables: Route of traffic to remote site Response of Remote server In many cases ...


6

You should configure your routers' DHCP private network address assignment. You should configure VirginRouter to assign addresses to DHCP clients on private network 192.168.1.x, and SkyRouter to assign addresses on private network 192.168.2.x . Let's investigate your current situation: Let's say that Virgin assigns your modem IP addr 72.22.22.22. Let's ...


5

I have had a cable of 30M be faulty, and a cable tester (albeit a cheap one) showed it as OK / didn't detect a fault. It may be that longer cables can be trodden on and that makes them less reliable(by damaging them). The kind of ethernet cables that I find to be reliable, have been one with a rugged jacket, they are expensive, and maybe a better quality ...


5

Your line runs between a pair on the MDF (main distribution frame) at the central office and a box on the street, which then connects to the NID at your home. There are OE and CP blocks on the frame (OE=office equipment or the phone switch, and CP=cable pair, or out to the street) that connect between your pair and the phone equipment. When DSL is installed, ...


5

PPPoE clients use PPPoE Active Discovery to discover PPPoE Access Concentrators (servers) on the network. The first packet the client transmits is a PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation (PADI) which is sent to the Ethernet broadcast address (all ones in binary, all f's in hex: ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff). And PPPoE ACs on the network respond with PADO's (Offers). The ...


5

First, you should install DynDNS client if your router does not support it. Second, you need to forward port 80 to the server machine. You should not be able to link to your router from the Internet ("the outside") as this would be a security hole. Do you really need to configure it from outside? I doubt it. If you do, you should be able to set this in the ...


5

Try these commands from the command line: nslookup bbc.co.uk ping bbc.co.uk telnet bbc.co.uk 80 The first command checks whether your computer can resolve the name. The second command checks whether the routing is set up correctly (i.e. packets can travel between your computer and the server). Note that not all servers allow ping. If in doubt, try with ...


5

What you're doing makes no sense - stop it now. The RJ11 port, on either box, is for the DSL link ONLY, it connects via your filter to your phone line and then onto the DSLAM using PPOA - it has nothing to do with ethernet ok. You simply need to connect your machines together via IP and configure them to route between each other - if you can't do this then ...


5

He left it for a reason. They are dirt cheap, have no user-serviceable parts and, therefore, are virtually worthless to fix. Your router doesn't have to fall or be be "electrocuted" to go bad. Normal household power glitches can damage it. The data or power connectors can come loose internally. Overheating can cause any of the electrical components to stop ...


5

The issue is the number of feet of telephone wire from your jack to the central office. Even homes a block or two away can differ by thousands of feet of wire. For example, ADLS2+ typically achieves speeds of up to 20Mbps through half a mile of wire (1Km). Bump that up to 2.5 miles (4Km) and you're down to 2Mbps. If there's sufficient demand, they can add ...


4

You need to buy either: A) standalone ASDL modem to plug into your existing router. B) A combined ASDL modem-router. (Which you can check beforehand if it supports DD-WRT) Also, lay off the question marks a bit ;)


4

I'd like to capture the data sent by my ADSL modem (what's really sent on the RJ11 cable). That's what an oscilloscope is for. ... I'd like to build a mini-computer ... A mini-computer is a low-cost computer (i.e. 16-bits) circa the 1970-80s. That term is now deprecated. ... with 2 RJ11 plug, one connected to the modem, one to the telephone ...


4

You don't have a choice. I'm pretty sure you can't even buy a plain bridging-only DSL modem today. Almost all DSL modems will support PPPoA or PPPoE, and they never support bridging over PPP*, so if you had any of the PPP* modes enabled, it would be, at the very least, doing one-address NAT gatewaying, not plain bridging. The standard for plain bridging ...


4

Electrically its unlikely - the connectors on the standard ethernet jacks are recessed and are unlikely to make contact with anything. Tripping on it and falling (or the system dropping) on the other hand, can potentially be quite catastrophic


4

You have to request a static IP address from your ISP - they will walk you through configuring you ADSL modem. You will have to pay extra for the privilege, though.


4

Not all ADSL modems are created equal. Here in the UK it is well worthwhile getting a modem based on an Alcatel chipset if British Telecom is your local loop supplier. Why? Because if you have a fault and your ISP gets a BT engineer to call around, they will plug in their own Alcatel based modem and if it works, you will be charged for wasting the engineers ...


4

It could be that you are using an incorrect category cable. You didn't mention what speed you are using. Here is a link to Cisco's explanation of cable types. At a minimum you should be using CAT 5 cable, this gives minimum error rate for 100BT and lower. With Gig-E widely available, CAT 6 cable is needed for the length run you state. ...


4

Sorry, but no. DSL and ADSL use frequencies to carry the data which are above the frequencies which ordinary phone lines will carry. Special conditioned lines without load coils must be used, and those lines, when they reach the Central Office, are hardwired to strip off the frequencies used for data and do not allow that data to connect to the Public ...


4

If the building's wiring is truly the culprit, which can be determined by the technician wiring a jack as close as possible to the demarcation point, and to that, temporarily connecting the DSL modem, so an improved SNR can be demonstrated, then indeed, a new line is indicated to bring the desired service to your apartment. A reference to DSL statistics can ...


3

"Intrinsic/Actual" refers to "the ratio of total bandwidth to maximum bandwidth." It is the right-hand value under Kbit from "Total Available Bandwidth" divided by the right hand value on the "Intrinsic/Actual and Maximum Bandwidth" line. I verified this on a calculator, and it comes out to 58.5% downstream and 58.3% upstream, so the output rounds down. ...


3

I am guessing I need to have some sort of Slave / Master (if I can use that term) to enforce authority on the network. That is correct. Sebastian mentioned how to do this step by step, and why. But often there's an easier way to configure a device as slave. There should be a setting in the configuration of your old router where you can choose a mode ...


3

Well, since no one has mentioned it... There is no reason to believe that a particular NIC's line drivers will actually push electrons all the way out to the Standards's maximum lengths. I have had exactly the problem you describe fixed by replacing one instance of a NIC with another instance of the same NIC -- same part number, same lot. I've also found ...


3

Yes. Simply disable NAT and DHCP service. You want it to be just a bridge, with wireless AP mode on. Use one of the LAN Ethernet ports to connect it into your home LAN (e.g. into a LAN port of your upstream router).


3

The way to fix "buffer bloat" is to disable your ISPs buffer entirely by limiting your incoming and outgoing bandwidth to just under their respective limits. This way the buffer on your ISP's side never gets used and you experience an improvement in latency at a small cost in throughput. tc is the Linux/DD-WRT/Tomato tool for this. A script exists called ...


3

Zyxel Router Passwords Maybe that link can help. Just reset the router and use the standard one.



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