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14

The purge-vault from this project works nicely: https://github.com/vsespb/mt-aws-glacier Install, then run these commands (replace vault-name with the name of your vault): mtglacier retrieve-inventory --config glacier.cfg --vault vault-name wait for about 2 hours, and then mtglacier download-inventory --config glacier.cfg --vault vault-name ...


7

https://github.com/leeroybrun/glacier-vault-remove was created for this exact purpose. To remove a vault, first install the dependencies: $ git clone https://github.com/leeroybrun/glacier-vault-remove.git $ cd glacier-vault-remove $ python setup.py install Then create a credentials file, credentials.json in the same directory: { "AWSAccessKeyId": ...


5

Click the triangle next to "Other Computers". (Or if you're using Arq 3, hover your mouse over "Other Backup Sets" and click the "Show" link). There you'll find your old backup data. Select it and click the "Adopt This Backup Set". This will cause Arq to adopt the settings and backup data it was using on your old computer, so you don't have to re-upload. ...


5

Glacier is designed and priced for data you don't expect you are likely to need. Glacier is designed with the expectation that retrievals are infrequent and unusual, and data will be stored for extended periods of time. https://aws.amazon.com/glacier/pricing/ I have several dozen terabytes stored there at the moment, and I highly recommend it -- ...


4

You can use a freeware product like CloudBerry Explorer http://www.cloudberrylab.com/free Note, Glacier data doesn't become available immediately. you need to wait 24 hours for the global inventory to occur on the Amazon side, then you should click Get Inventory button and wait another 5 hours to get the inventory for your account. Thanks


3

If you remove a Glacier-backed folder in Arq it goes into Arq's trash. If you select it in Arq's trash and click "Delete Permanently", Arq will delete all the Glacier archives and attempt to delete the Glacier vault. The vault delete might fail because Amazon has to update its "inventory", which it does once/day. The next day, browse under "Other Backup ...


3

(I'm the developer of Arq) If you back up to Glacier with Arq, Arq won't delete anything from Glacier. I plan to eventually add a budget feature for Glacier backups where Arq would delete oldest backup versions to stay under a budget you choose, but it wouldn't delete anything that would incur early deletion charges.


3

There is another software also named glacier-cli (https://github.com/basak/glacier-cli) but in python that seems to work pretty well.


3

Try vsespb/mt-aws-glacier – Perl multithreaded multipart sync to Amazon Glacier with easy deploy instructions for CentOS.


3

The canonical library for interfacing with AWS via Python is Boto. Though it is intended to be used as a library in a Python script, it is simple enough to use independently. You can skim the fine documentation, and this page has an overview of how to use Boto, but here are the important parts: Put your AWS credentials in ~/.boto: [Credentials] ...


3

Amazon Glacier data isn't really meant to be accessed on a whim. It takes considerable time to pull data out of a vault. I'd recommend using CloudBerry Explorer. It's free and for the most part seems to work. After installing, you'll need to add your Glacier account. Double click New account and add a display name (can be whatever you want): To grab ...


2

It looks as if your files were uploaded using FastGlacier. If so, the simplest approach is to install FastGlacier on another machine, point it at your vault, and request a new inventory. In 4-5 hours it will receive the inventory, decode the filenames, and make them available to you. The FastGlacier documentation indicates that the filename is encoded as ...


2

While Amazon EBS indeed provides the ability to create point-in-time snapshots of volumes, which are persisted to Amazon S3, this operation is outside of your control and entirely handled by EC2, see the respective FAQ Will I be able to access my snapshots using the regular Amazon S3 APIs?: No, snapshots are only available through the Amazon EC2 APIs. ...


2

EBS snapshots cannot be moved to Glacier nor does it make much sense to store them there. As EBS snapshots are incremental, each snapshot typically points to data stored in many previous snapshots. Because retrieval of objects from Glacier takes an extremely long time, even of it was possible to move EBS snapshots to Glacier, restoring data contained in ...


1

You could use Windows Explorer to copy directories. If you prefer command line, then xcopy should work: xcopy \\MyServer\Some\Longwinded\Path\TheDataIWantToCopy D: /S I am Linux guy myself and prefer Linux tools like rsync, and there is rsync UI compiled for Windows called grsync which may work even better because it is restartable (it would not copy ...


1

Inside the AWS console panel, there is no way to get the contents of a vault. You have to use an SDK or pre-packaged software to access this information. In my answer, I am using the PHP SDK v3 with Composer though this code can be adapted to other languages like Java. The key is to use the InitiateJob API function with Type set to inventory-retrieval. The ...


1

I have been working on an application which allows you to archive content out of your dropbox folder and into a Secure Capsule. It's online now in an early beta @ www.securecapsule.com. The app uses AWS Glacier for storage and provides a web application and dropbox integration for archiving and retrieving files. It isn't free, though the prices are ...


1

Apparently icebox can achieve this: https://www.iceboxpro.com/ (although you have to do some of the amazon glacier setup yourself) However, be aware of issues around restoring too much data from amazon glaciar, the restore process can get very expensive: https://aws.amazon.com/glacier/faqs/#How_much_data_can_I_retrieve_for_free Since Icebox depends on your ...


1

You can do this with Arq. I am considering this solution myself. The only question I have not fully answered is whether using glacier for frequently changed files could eventually lead to early deletion charges. My theory is that no, but I would like to see it printed black on white. :)



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