New answers tagged

1

Most realtime AV will check as soon as its done downloading, and many can search inside a 'simple' archive. In theory, you can set this up with a AV that runs in CLI but I can't really find any (easily) and all I'd be doing is reading the documentation back to you. Its handy if you want a second level of defense I suppose but in most cases you shouldn't ...


3

According to the answer here, the feature is outdated and useless as of windows 2000. From the accepted answer: The reason is that with Windows 2000 and later, Microsoft added abilities within the operating system itself that allow antivirus and other security applications to gain access to files before the operating system and thus other applications ...


0

Yes, but only in a nuanced sense, which is probably not what you mean. Viruses are mostly extinct (they died out in about 2005-6) but were replaced with far nastier Trojans (and a few worms as well). So, yes, linux in particular is better situated to deal with viral threats, but is just as susceptible to other forms of malware as any system. The argument ...


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Linux is very secure, but not entirely secure. First of all, a malicious script that is going to perform a system-wide change needs root password. If root password is confidential and strong enough, the OS is very secure. If the malicious software is compiled for a specific distribution, for example, a RPM based distribution as RedHat, Fedora or CentOs ...


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No, Linux is not virus-free in the sense that: "A computer virus is a malware that, when executed, replicates by reproducing itself or infecting other programs by modifying them." There are many methods by which a program on Linux can self-replicate and could be seen as malicious. A simple example would be a Python script, which would quite happily ...


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The link you provided looks like a typical email click tracking redirect link. The site that the url first goes to tracks the hit then redirects to the correct url. This can be verified by using a redirect checking tool such as Redirect Checker. In your case, there is one redirect which would take you to: ...


2

You mentioned it's an installer. It may work by self-extracting its content to a temporary folder and running extracted setup.exe or similar. If that's the case then you may be able to extract the files (and proper directory structure) to chosen destination with another (trusted) program (e.g. try 7-Zip on your exe). The resulting files will hopefully be ...


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You can break up the exe into parts using curl and then try to scan individual ones as you have already thought of. But it depends on the exe itself and how it is encoded. Most AVs work based on signatures and will check for them across the complete exe. If the executable is not encoded in any way then yes the splitting method might work. But if it is ...


1

My experience says that the best method to check if an executable has virus can be done by installing it. If you have the time and effort, you can download VirtualBox for free, create a virtual machine, install anti virus and anti malware on it, copy the executable, disconnect it from your network and hit install. Test for strange behavior. After you are ...


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There are several ways you can harden a Windows system, The first is to remove/disable any services that you do not or will not use. i.e. remote services or telnet. Next you want to disable/rename your built in accounts. You want to have and admin account but that shouldn't be the account you would be logging into on a daily basis you want to create a user ...


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Kaspersky injects a script into web traffic for protection purposes. There's an option within KIS / KTS (DL) 16.01.445 to disable script injection. Just go to Kaspersky Settings > Additional > Network > Traffic Processing > uncheck Inject Script. Reference: Answer on Kaspersky Forums


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It's a very common issue when Avast is uninstalled to have your PC left in shatters. In many cases (google this), people are left with systems that won't boot at all. The best thing I can suggest is to use a tool like Revo Uninstaller to uninstall it. It's very good at finding the files and settings left behind after an installation. With Revo Uninstaller, ...


2

A "false positive" is defined as when the anti-malware software detected a problem, but it wasn't actually malicious. There is no surefire direct simple process that will 100% rule out a false positive. If there were, we would automate that technique, and make that part of the anti-malware software. So the answer to your question, "Is there any manual ...



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