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7

Here is my official answer after your answering my comments. I could be quite wrong about some of this and welcome corrections. I'm not sure when Intel began incorporating PCIe (which is a software-compatible extension of PCI) into their CPUs. However, it hasn't been this way for the majority of the time x86 has been around. PCI is really part of the ...


6

Try cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/cpuinfo_max_freq. On my android this reads 1113600, so this is in kHz.


6

The confusion stems from the fact that a System on a Chip ALWAYS contains a CPU. Traditionally computers are built from various discrete components, among them are the following simplified examples: CPU (Central Processing Unit) (Handles execution of code, decisions, manages hardware) FPU (Floating-point Unit)- Math Coprocessor for Floating point math. ...


5

You may want to switch to an alternative software available natively on your architecture, murmur and mumble come to mind. murmur and mumble homepage


5

Arm processors have been getting increasingly complex - so its an apple to orange comparison - arm has only had a 64 bit varient for about 2 years, and even within the same generation power use varies. Its probably fairer to consider contemporary ARM processors and their atom counterparts as anandtech have done here. Most of the power use isn't the ...


4

AFAICT the clock of a S3C2416 looks just like that of a S3C2443, or similar processors of its family. The Linux source code for it suggests that there are a number of closely-related clocks. Choice snippet: pll = get_mpll(mpllcon, xtal); clk_msysclk.clk.rate = pll; fclk = pll / get_fdiv(clkdiv0); hclk = s3c2443_prediv_getrate(&...


4

EDIT: 2013-10-31: The question has been edited significantly, but I'll leave the old answer below. Yes. It is possible. Raspberry Pi - an ARM-based system - has become somewhat mainstream and encouraged development of several official and unofficial ARM ports of popular linux distributions which can be run on many ARM-based platforms. However, that's not ...


4

Suppose you have an ARM embedded device and a x64 based laptop. Both systems are running GNU/Linux. OK. If you decide to copy the "ls" binary from the laptop to the embedded device and run it on the embedded, will it work? This is where it gets tricky. It obviously won't run as is; the instruction sets are completely different. However, it can be ...


3

The whole point of supporting several architectures is to provide "the same system" on all platforms. Programs that are not written for ARM will not run on it, that goes without saying. In general, all major services will be included, some desktop applications may not be.


3

Short version : if you don't have the source code then no. Long version : you can use qemu (or kvm or virtualbox, etc) and use a minimal x86 emulated system to run the server.


3

I had the same problem and I solved creating a ~/.asoundrc in cubie and adding the next lines: pcm.!default { type hw card 1 #change to 0 to use HP, 1 HDMI } ctl.!default { type hw card 1 #change to 0 to use HP, 1 HDMI } save and do a test speaker-test -twav -c2 This is not the best way to enable the HDMI/HP but it works


3

Short: You have to extract the ppd file from the linux driver long: FIRST Goto Brothers Driver website and search for DCP195: http://support.brother.com Download the Linux deb Version of "CUPSwrapper printer driver (deb package)" Open the deb-File with a compression tool and follow the path down to "dcp195ccupswrapper-1.1.3-1.i386/opt/brother/Printers/...


2

This should work: Emulating Raspberry Pi in Windows the easy way Direct link to download: Raspberry Pi emulation for Windows Just download the folder, unzip and run the batch file – then follow the supplied instructions to login etc.


2

I got both the latest Debian and ArchLinux images to load using QEMU running under Windows 7 x64 with the following command lines: qemu-system-arm -kernel kernel-qemu -cpu arm1176 -M versatilepb -serial stdio -append "root=/dev/sda2 panic=1" -hda debian6-19-04-2012.img -clock dynticks and qemu-system-arm -kernel kernel-qemu -cpu arm1176 -M versatilepb -...


2

as qemu supports raw disk image format, just do qemu -hda plug_SD-karte.img -m 256


2

Use this emulator from Microsoft - http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5352


2

VirtualBox is an x86 and AMD64/Intel64 virtualization product. I believe there isn't a version that runs on ARM hardware. You may be able to run some versions of Windows on ARM using an emulator such as QEMU, Bochs or DOSBox but I doubt the path will be smooth..


2

There are some benchmarks that compute scores that can be used for such comparisons. Try searching for DMIPS/MHz and maybe also CoreMark/MHz. I'd expect them to be more comparable in performance to Atom CPUs though.


2

The reason the formula tells you to multiply by the number of cores is that you are actually performing addition multiple times assuming the core speeds are the same. If that is not the case, just separate the calculations and add the results: [167 x (Flops/cycle)]+[450 x (Flops/cycle)]= GFlops That's all there is to it.


2

The stability issues of HFS+ (non journaled) were mainly about accessing drives > 2TB. This limit was removed at the end of June 2011. Open bugs can be tracked at bugzilla.kernel.org. Discussions and patches for HFS+ on Linux are submitted to the linux-fsdevel list. Changes to the HFS+ source code can be tracked at git.kernel.org. There is still no Journal ...


2

There used to be a multi-paged document on "Booting ARM Linux". Unfortunately the web link to that document is now broken, but a copy seems to be here. That doc however did not specify or advise a specific bootloader or any file/data organization on boot media. Items that I recall were things like the kernel should be linked to execute at the start of ...


2

Windows RT (what the Surface RT runs) does not support traditional applications, otherwise known as "win32" applications. As Mono is a win32 application it cannot run on a Surface RT. The Surface RT is also "locked" so you cannot install your own applications - even IF they were recompiled for the ARM processor.


2

I won't go into any controversies that surround UEFI, Secure boot or TPM in general (out of scope), so I'll try and answer as directly as possible. UEFI is (for all intents and purposes) a BIOS 'replacement' that sits at the BIOS level (between hardware and OS). UEFI Secure boot has to be supported by the firmware (BIOS); UEFI Secure boot is essentially a ...


2

In the 70's and early 80's: RAM was very very expensive it ran at the same speed as the CPU. programming by hand in assembly language was common So - simplifying very much here - it made sense to design CPUs where each instruction performed a lot of work, was easy to translate from high-level languages, and where programs were expected to use memory as ...


2

I think you're on the right track and you've essentially already answered your question. A 32 bit CPU can address 4,294,967,296 memory locations. 4GB of RAM is a total of 4,294,967,296 bytes, so how can the CPU access all of that memory and still have address space to access hardware (registers are not mapped to memory locations)? Well, it can't. It ...


1

No xbmc does not at this time support hardware decoding on the mk802 III however it is possible to configure xbmc to use another player which does support hardware decoding as discussed here: XBMC Wiki - External Players This is a playercorefactory.xml which lists a few common players: playercorefactory.xml


1

I am not entirely sure I have understood what you're asking. If you want to connect from a server, through the ARM board to the seismic recorder, this should do what you want: ssh -fN user@192.168.1.10 -L 5000:192.168.1.100:5000 The above command will connect to 192.168.1.10 and link your local port 5000 to the port 5000 of 192.168.1.100. Once you have ...


1

Currently as you know that there are projects with OpenWRT on ARM. Besides that from buildroot you can choose a wide range of ARM MPU, to build a new distribution, there are also some commercial SoC projects like this. Well! Do you can virtualize these images with similar features and good performance? Sure! The performance is decided by the host machine ...


1

To answer each question: Is there an ARM compiled distro of Xubuntu or or Lubuntu? Yes. Ubuntu - and other distros - can run on ARM (though there might or might not be a port available for your device) and (presumably) you could install XFCE/LXDE on it. Is there another Linux OS that supports VirtualBox and has an ARM compilation that would be better ...



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