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11

Use CallGraph. It is free and easy to use. Plus you can configure it to record the two halves of the conversation on different channels (left and right) which makes editing easier. They have actually had very responsive support (free) when I have had questions too. Pamela is a little better, but more expensive, unless you only want to record really short ...


9

Audacity would work great to edit out the noise from the cell phone. It has a filter that you can give it a sample of the noise you want to remove and then you can apply it to the recording to remove (as best as it can) the sound from the recording. You will have to probably try it several times to get it right, and it won't remove it completely, but it ...


9

In my Windows 7, there is a "Stereo Mix" in recording devices. Just choose that as default recording device and/or "default communicating device"(I don't know the exact name; it's in the context menu). Then any program which uses this device will catch what you can hear through the speakers. In Windows XP it should be the same name. However, it depends on ...


9

If I plug a line or USB microphone into my PC, I can record audio at 44.1kHz. That's one sample of audio about every 23 microseconds. The audio wave must be sampled and played back precisely or it will sound distorted. How do non-realtime OSes manage the very time-sensitive process of audio recording and playback with such high sample rates? Is the ...


8

Audacity should do the job See: Record a phone conversation with Skype Recording Skype call - can you help?


7

You can use Soundflower to pass audio from the Skype call to Garageband. Fairly easy and all free/open source


7

VLC (although not the perfect tool for the job) does this quite easily for you. Using the 'advanced open' dialogue, you can select your stream, and save it to a specific location (in mp3 if you wish). Further editing can be done using Audacity.


7

I use a proper mic and a DAW (specifically an M-Audio FastTrack), and it totally changed the quality of my recordings.There's a big difference between a proper powered mic (even those of slightly dubious providence, but the one I have linked is good and robust), and built in ones, or even those that plug into a computer mic jack. I also like to run voice ...


6

I would recommend one of two ways: 1: If your tapes contain rare or special recordings: Get this $130 USB tape deck and rip your tapes to your computer. (Note: there's a $100 USB turntable available as well.) Consider using this $35 preamp and noise filter if needed. Plan on spending many long evenings filled with tape swapping and mp3 editing. 2: If your ...


6

Okay, so eventually I did figure out what was wrong. Of course, I'm not saying what I got is as good as a decent mic, however I find it much better now, even suitable. What you'll want to do is go to System Preferences, choose Sound, select Input tab and ensure ambient noise reduction is unchecked for the internal microphone: Apparently, this option is ...


6

In Windows Vista, I had to do the following: Go to Control Panel > Sound > Manage Audio Devices Select the Recording tab Right click an item or blank area on the list of devices and enable "Show Disabled Devices". This made the Stereo Mix device appear. Right click the Stereo Mix device and select "Enable" "Stereo Mix" was then available as an input ...


6

These instructions show how to capture/record directly from a MP3/M3U stream of a radio station, using VLC player, setting up VLC via its graphical user interface (GUI). Using Windows version of VLC but instructions should be usable for other platforms. Please discuss if necessary and contribute. These are working instructions. Please abide by copyright ...


5

You can use Audacity. Here is a video tutorial on how to remove noise.


5

I use MP3 Skype Recorder. The MP3 files can be edited using Audacity.


5

GarageBand is another option. It's fairly easy to use and will let you do more sophisticated things as your needs increase. Podcasts in Garageband


5

Regardless of OS, Audacity can do this just fine. So says Wikipedia: Noise Removal based on sampling the noise to be removed. Surface noise from records, for example, can be removed with hardly any discernable effect on the music. See this Audacity Wiki entry for Noise Removal. As for batch, see the manual page.


5

Audacity and it works on any platform!


5

Short answer Create a scheduled task and use ffmpeg together with a batch file to record your microphone. Long answer Download ffmpeg-XXXX-win32-static.7z for Windows and extract it with 7-zip or Winrar Copy Bin\ffmpeg.exe to a folder of your choice (You can delete the other files & folders) Create a new text file and paste the following code. Save ...


5

Short answer: add -strict experimental (or the alias -strict -2) before the output file name. Longer answer: mp4 usually contains H.264 video and AAC audio. For the H.264 video you will want to encode it using the GPL-licensed libx264 (which you are doing). There are multiple AAC encoders that can be used with ffmpeg. There is a native ffmpeg AAC ...


5

To generate a 1000 Hz signal for 5 seconds duration use this: ffmpeg -f lavfi -i "sine=frequency=1000:duration=5" test.wav You can add -c:a pcm_s16le: ffmpeg -f lavfi -i "sine=frequency=1000:duration=5" -c:a pcm_s16le test.wav To also set the sampling rate to 48 KHz: ffmpeg -f lavfi -i "sine=frequency=1000:sample_rate=48000:duration=5" -c:a ...


4

I would convert it to WAV so Audacity can process it. An article on audio files - here. It says: There is one major uncompressed audio format, PCM, which is usually stored in a .wav file on Windows or in a .aiff file on Mac OS (So, a WMA/Windows Media Audio file is a lossy compressed wav.)


4

Audacity can read WMA files with the FFMpeg plugin. Download and install that. I would probably start with normalization to get the clip as loud as possible. "Effects" - "Normalize". Then I would run "Compressor" 1-3 times to even out the sound between voice 1 and voice 2. Then perhaphs finish off by some "Amplify" if needed, 1-5 dB? Depends on what you ...


4

TL;DR: If you're serious about broadcasting, yes, they will help! Here's the main problem: The sound "cards" included in motherboards of typical PCs or laptops are of rather bad quality. Here are some drawbacks: They might lack shielding, thus picking up interferences from the surrounding hardware You can't connect a professional microphone to them. ...


4

Just use ferrite beads on your wiring. Never solve a hardware problem in software if you can avoid it.


4

There's not a simple command-line way of doing it like that, no. The best way, for programs that support it, is JACK. Tell a program to use JACK output, and use a JACK-capable recording tool (which could include command-line ones such as jack_capture, qarecord, ecasound or even plain old jackrec) to connect to that application's output port and save it. ...


4

Microsoft Songsmith. http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/projects/songsmith/


4

I would use Soundflower with Audacity. Soundflower is a Mac OS X (10.2 and later) system extension that allows applications to pass audio to other applications. Soundflower is easy to use, it simply presents itself as an audio device, allowing any audio application to send and receive audio with no other support needed. Soundflower is free, ...



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