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0

You are misinterpretting what “line 3” refers to. Look here: But the scripts are not being executed, in the log I have msg: /etc/cron.daily/xxx_backups: line 3: /home/xxx/do_backup.sh: No such file or directory In line 3 of the script SVN_ROOT=/home/svn/ It is referring to line 3 of /etc/cron.daily/xxx_backups and not line 3 of ...


1

From the man page for crontab: The entire command portion of the line, up to a newline or % character, will be executed by /bin/sh or by the shell specified in the SHELL variable of the crontab file. Percent-signs (%) in the command, unless escaped with backslash (\), will be changed into newline characters, and all data after the first % will be sent ...


0

The users' system configuration files are usually under the home of each single user. Those are files and directories often hidden (they start with .). You should backup even them with that command. Check with man uname and man hostname to have some useful things to put in the backup filename. E.g. the line sudo tar -cvpzf ...


0

SuperDuper! does just that, and I—like you—prefer an external USB drive ready to roll in the event of a disaster. Just install the software, select source and destination drives and away you go!


2

Given that you have all the basic prerequisites, particularly ECC RAM, I think ZFS (through the ZFS On Linux implementation) might be a usable option. Unlike btrfs, which borrows a lot of design ideas from ZFS, ZFS is a tried and true (volume manager and) file system. Sure, the Linux port has some rough edges that are being smoothed out over time, but the ...


0

Par2 is a mature software option for making parity files. You can configure it to allow and set percentage of file to be lost but still recoverable. [1][2] For example, 30% redundancy: par2 c -r30 file-to-protect LUKS needs good configuration for security. aes-xts-plain64:sha256 or slightly better PBKDF2-sha512 with a quality random 256/512-bit key is ...


1

I confirmed that Paragon's Backup and Recovery tool doesn't include these files in actual backups. Only the names of the files however appear in explorer because they are present in Master File table back up partition (which is not the actual data on disk).


0

thanks to all for reply & help. After all, i found a solution. The avocent console server contains 2 alternative commands. Wich do exactly what i need. saveconf --help restoreconf --help < thx + best regards schtebo


0

I have tried that on a virtual machine and, if you are not planning on backuping a hibernated system, you are good to go.


1

If the cli starts a "new shell", the master shell waits for it to exit and never runs your other commands. Though, you apparently want to run your commands within the cli shell, not after it (maybe except the second exit, which probably should exit the master shell). For that you have to use an appropriate syntax of your system or an appropriate ...


0

Backing up does not break anything. To get an exact duplicate of the system, doing a bit copy of the drive (maybe compressing it first) is the way to go. I understand you don't want to do that, which means you will be making some compromises. From a users perspective /home/* is probably the most important, and similarly /root /etc contains your ...


0

Alright, I see. But you should at least take a backup of /home <- user files /etc <- this is where the configuration files are located. /var with "tar" you could archive those dirs like this. tar -pcvzf backup.tar.gz /home /etc /var --exclude='/var/tmp' --exclude='/var/lock' --exclude='/var/run' You could check the size of those directories and se ...


3

I don't have a Blu-ray device to test with, but AFAIK this will work. This will take a rewritable Blu-ray disc If you have no rewritable Blu-ray discs, I think this is impossible, unless you are willing to mount a flash drive to /home/partimag for step 3 and burn the image to the Blu-ray with another computer. First, verify that your Blu-ray disc is ...


0

If you need to use Linux, then you can try these options without having to format/partition/dualboot/etc... Option 1:Virtual Machine Apps: Virtualbox Virtualbox is a multi-platform software that lets you run any version for any OS (Linux, Windows, Mac) on any machine virtually! For example, if you have installed Virtualbox on Windows 10, and need to test ...


0

To expand on the comments already given, you can boot the Linux live distribution, run "lsblk" to figure out which letter your internal hard disk corresponds to (usually sda), then plug a second hard disk that is at least as big as the original. Using dd if=/dev/sda of=sdb/backup/disk.img That would create an .IMG image of your windows 10 instalation, ...


0

The quick steps are stored into a hidden folder of your pst / ost. MS Outlook's Export feature does not allow you to export that folder. So you'll need a third party tool to do it for you. You can try MFCMAPI (I never tried it, always recreated the quick steps manually). More information can be found here. NB. If you're using Exchange the quick steps ...


-1

Yes you can just restore the C: drive and leave all of the other drives untouched. When you boot into the install CD, or however you plan on doing this, just don't touch D:, E:, etc. I've done this a few times on my personal computer, reformatting C: and leaving the other drives untouched.


0

Most likely you need /FFT to relax the comparison of timestamps. Edit - each file system stores timestamps with certain precision. NTFS has precision of 1/10 of microsecond, both for created and modified timestamps. FAT has 10 ms and 2 seconds respectively [1]. So if you are copying from NTFS to FAT, then timestamps are getting rounded up and on the next ...


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Two suggestions: 1. Use robocopy sourcedir destination /CREATE /S. This will copy the folder structure and all files but set the filesize of each file to 0. Use tree /F to get a tree listing of all files. This is a graphical representation of the folder tree, along with all filenames. It's not, though, a backup - if you are interested in a list of files ...


0

How do I create a list of files including the subdirectory hierarchy? Use the following command: dir /a-d /b /s > myfiles.txt Further Reading An A-Z Index of the Windows CMD command line - An excellent reference for all things Windows cmd line related. dir - Display a list of files and subfolders.


0

The "not a bootable disk" on the clones makes it sound as though the boot flag hasn't been set on that. How do I check if the boot flag is set? Good question. diskpart is your friend: Start a regular command prompt and run diskpart from that; or you can run diskpart from the Start menu or diskpart.exe directly. It will ask for admin access. list volume ...


0

Here is your crontab command: 00 1 * * * osmc cd /media/SAMSUNG/backups/work/daily && zip -r -FS Workdaily$(date +%a) /media/Data/Work You state: If I run this manually it works fine. So what this all means is the command works perfectly when you are logged in, but not in a crontab correct? Well, look at your command. Specifically the zip. ...


0

If you want to proactively detect the corruption, then you need a dedicated task that runs continuously in the background, re-computes checksums and compares them to previously stored values. There's no way around this, because bitrot is spontaneous random phenomenon. Furthermore, the common form of it is a single bit flips and that cannot be detected in any ...


0

Check %APPDATA%\Notepad++\backup and the its install dir's backup subdir. But if you answered no to saving it, it's probably lost. You can test the 7-second backup by editing a file, then killing Notepad++ with task manager (after 7) and looking for that saved file in those backup dirs. Then restart Notepad++ and see if it remembers your edits.


2

The easiest way is to take a image of the partition/hard drive. Take a look at dd man page. dd @ wikipedia. some dd commands In short, you use dd to take a image of your partition/harddrive with command dd if=/dev/sda of=/backupfoler/sda.img dd if=/dev/sda1 of=/backupfolder/sda1.img and to restore, you just boot the computer with a live cd and reverse ...


0

Frankly, if you are unwilling or unable to use ECC RAM I would not consider using a self-healing file system such as ZFS (as discussed in the linked forum post) or Btrfs. The reason is simply that the "self-healing" features quite easily can become "self-destructing" if there is a RAM problem. Instead, on a non-ECC RAM system, you would probably be better ...


1

AutoHotKey to the rescue! Limiting yourself to the Windows command line is painful. Since you mentioned that you intend to do this loop in conjunction with AutoHotKey, why not just use AutoHotKey for the whole thing? Use StrLen and SubStr to extract the variable portion of your file path. The file loop will recurse through all the files you want. And then ...


2

It's a judgement call, depending on factors such as what happened with the infection, how long you had it for, what kind of symptoms you experienced, etc... but generally you should have a strong bias against ever trusting an installed operating system once it's been infected. Your safest course is usually to back up your data and re-install your system from ...


0

To complement the other answers already posted. I have been using MHDDFS for 10+ years now. I believe that it has some performance issues as discussed on damek but it just creates a virtual volume out of your existing mounts, super simple for me. Once installed it is just single line in /etc/fstab: mhddfs#/mnt/hdd1,/mnt/hdd2,/mnt/hdd3 /mnt/virtual fuse ...


1

What types of files does System Restore Change System Restore can make changes to Windows system files, registry settings, and programs installed on your computer. It also can make changes to scripts, batch files, and other types of executable files on your computer. Personal files, such as documents, e‑mail, photos, and music files, are not ...


4

System Restore do not destroy your saved documents or recieved e-mail. And proccess is absolutly reversible. But if you was infected by a virus you have a 99.9% of chance to have infected/deleted your current restore points. UPDATE: What is the point of System Restore?. System Restore helps you restore your computer's system files to an ...


0

For having multiple images on a flash drive, I use Yumi. It's small and works well. It takes an iso file and puts onto the drive. You can simultaneously have as many iso's as you have size for. Yes, it was originally designed for Linux, but I've used it for Windows already and it works just fine.


1

Ghost is old but unfortunately working decently well for the job. If you have access to Ghost Console (not just the ghost.exe) you can use it to create DOS-based ISO (or bootable USB) which will boot DOS, run Ghost, and you can even script it so running ghost will automatically image the machine. An idea: Rather than doing it on the Client PC (where it ...


0

Macrium reflect is a very good program to replace ghost for Windows 7 machines - Try with the free edition but you must purchase as you have a few computers. Reflect also has a PE compatible version which can be run from the USB stick once you have booted the Hiren Mini-XP.


1

You can use unetbootin to make a USB stick bootable from the clonezilla ISO. After unetbootin is done with the USB stick, you can boot a PC with the master image and capture it on the USB stick. Then make copies of the USB stick. You would have to modify the start up script to make it run automatically.


1

You need to implement a standard supported infrastructure to achieve what you want, otherwise you are going to create a bundle of hacks. If your VM needs to run 24/7, what have you done to cater for hardware failure? This isn't just a situation of "I need to make a backup copy", it should also be "I need to cater for maximum uptime". A full VMware kit, two ...


1

The answer to the question as asked is no; snapshots are per file system and you can only operate on the whole file system when working with the snapshot. So if you roll back to a previous snapshot, that affects the entire file system. The way to restore specific files or directories from a ZFS snapshot is to navigate into the snapshot directory and then ...


2

To answer the question "Is it possible", the answer is no. ZFS snapshots have no concept of files, folders, or anything else, it is a block level snapshot of the entire filesystem. You can however browse a snapshot and access individual files, as indicated in duenni's answer, or you can clone a snapshot giving you a second copy of the filesystem without ...


4

In this case I would go to /tank/home/.zfs/snapshot/snapshot_week_01 and pull out the data you need. See Displaying and Accessing ZFS Snapshots on Oracle's website for details.


-1

The backup function in Norton 360 takes hours to back up my files each time (hundreds of GBs, Windows 8.1 Pro). The bad thing is that the animation (i.e. moving documents to the backup location) may not actually represents that it is really backing up your files. I have to cancel the backup process time and again because it has been going on several hours ...


0

Wow that sounds terrible. Ext4 is a journalling file system, but these do sound like issues with a non-journalled file system. We see this recently with people using exFAT on drives they switch between Windows and Mac machines and not being detached properly, some write operation still occurring, or like your scenarios. It is surprising to hear that your ...


3

I assume that you meant that you have two 1TB drives, and one 2TB drive. First off, you need to be fully aware that RAID is not a backup in the first place. Redundant RAID (which RAID 0 is not) gives you a chance (by no means a guarantee that you will be able to!) to handle failures within the storage system without the storage system failing completely. ...


0

Would a high performance large capacity USB drive be an improvement? It weighs less, woudldn't flap around (as it needs no additional support) and will be relatively more secure in the USB socket. At 128GB the price is comparable and I doubt you could make full use of the performance of the SSD anyway. ext4 will report errors but a journalised file system ...


2

If you use only 70% of the tape, than the lifespan will be proportionally longer. However, then you have to use more tapes. Lifespan depends on the number of end-to-end passes, that is how many times the tape was completely moved from one reel to the other. Writing the tape to full capacity means several end-to-end passes, because only a limited number of ...


0

You can run (WinKey+R) "shell:User Pinned" and it will open an file explorer window with the folder that holds (TaskBar) the pinned shortcuts. Here you have a useful list of other folders: http://winaero.com/blog/list-of-shell-commands-in-windows-10/ Hope this helps.


1

Settings are in different locations in the Registry, but you could in principle export each as REG files, and concatenate them if you wish to make restoring settings easier. For example, HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel has settings for many frequently customized items, such as Mouse, Sounds etc. However, there is a risk that an incompatible or bad ...


1

Windows File History is useful for restoring to an older version of a file; e.g. a Word document that was messed up in editing. However, It may make multiple backups of unchanged files, which could fill the drive. It may miss files that are not in defined Libraries. The best protection against primary drive failure is to make an image of the whole ...


0

Just like Windows 7's Backup and Restore, File History will back up the user's personal folders, and allows earlier versions of files to be viewed more easily. And, like Windows 7, the user can also create a separate Windows Image Backup of the main drive. If the main drive fails it's possible to restore that image to a new drive under -certain conditions- ...



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