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You won't get the same speed as transferring a file, but hopefully you can get faster. Use the SQL Profiler to record the query with the database. Have a look at the results to ensure the program isn't sending unnecessary queries accompanying the main query, which due to latency may be slowing things down. Ideally you want to see a connection and just the ...


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It is possible you are being throttled by your ISP. You mentioned downloading movies; I know for a fact that my ISP will throttle any p2p downloads (Linux ISOs, etc) if I use over a certain amount of transfer each month. If it isn't p2p, bear in mind that servers may only allocate a certain amount of bandwidth to each client, to ensure one doesn't hog it ...


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You can easily test it by sending a large file from one VM to the other (and make sure you use the right IP's). Most of the ftp traffic will be UDP. UDP overhead is about 6% (if you count both the headers and the acks coming back). If your ftp transfer goes faster than 100Mbps/1.06, then the VM's are communicating faster than the physical device can ...


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The VMs' network access is managed on the host through bridging or NATing. It's therefore the host that will direct the traffic to the right place which obviously doesn't need to leave the actual computer (and doesn't). The speed obtained for such transfer will depend on the virtual network adapters used on both machines unless the host's load is so high ...


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Wifi has more bandwidth (here is a comparison with Wifi direct). Nevertheless, the bluetooth bandwidth should be sufficient for high quality audio transmission. Your choppy experience might be the result of high spectrum usage in your building. Unlike wifi with its fixed channels, bluetooth uses frequency hopping across different channels (Wiki-Link). ...


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Bluetooth is a low energy standard designed for short distances suitable to devices that don't require much bandwidth. It is considered a personal area network. Wifi is developed as a larger scale network allowing greater distances and speeds. You can see a comparison of their theoretical maximum speeds on Wikipedia. Note that the two protocols use the ...


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I use NetWorx on my home network for bandwidth monitoring. It can log data directly from the router using SNMP or UPnP. The caveat is that you need to keep your monitoring PC switched on and monitoring traffic 24/7 because the router resets its upload and download counters every 4 GB. While this lets you know what your total bandwidth consumption is, it ...


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Probably not, but BitTorrent (BT) might still be a good idea for your problem. BT divides large files into chunks (so-called pieces) and calculates SHA1 hashes for each piece. Pieces can be loaded individually of each other (out of order and also in parallel). After a piece is downloaded completely(!) the SHA1 is checked and if a corruption is found the ...


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This type of problem only has a few possible causes: network adapter compatibility issues (which are very uncommon nowadays) cabling issue which seems to be the most likely cause; make sure to try the same cable that you use to connect your router. software related issue such as a firewall rule; try disabling your firewall and any security software If ...


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Depending on how big a problem this is, next generation firewalls are designed to do this (disclaimer - I used to work for Sonicwall) and might be worth a look. Next generation firewalls go beyond IP address and port level granularity and allow you to set policy at the firewall based on the application the traffic belongs to - so if you want to rate limit ...


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At the network level you can handle this with an application aware firewall - I've used Sonicwall firewalls in the past to do this with their app control feature. The device gives you the capability to apply a complex ruleset to traffic based on the application signature. Possible operations include block, allow, rate limit, reserve bandwidth and allow no ...



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