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Stuff like that of course isn’t listed in the specs. It wouldn’t be very good advertising if the manufacturer admitted its “Gigabit Router” could only actually route 200 Mbps. Then, there’s hardware acceleration: Most routers’ CPUs are just way to slow to handle the traffic. That’s why some sort of hardware acceleration is usually used to speed things up. ...


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Theoretically it's possible, but in practice it can be difficult to do. It you are downloading files over HTTP, it's possible to start and end the download at the defined offsets. Most download manages can use it to stop the download process and then continue to download the file from the point it have stopped downloading. There are many free download ...


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This seems to me to be a major bug in Windows 10. But you can stop Windows Update to recover your internet connection. If you go to Network & Internet in Settings, then WiFi, then click Advanced Options, you can set the network as a metered connection to stop Windows Update. I suggest you do this temporarily so that you can actually use the internet. ...


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Windows update uses BITS to download the update files. You may try to use the bitsadmin tool to edit the priority of the download jobs. C:>bitsadmin /SetPriority myDownloadJob LOW For detailed information, please refer to this link. Also, the powershell command can do the same job. Set-BitsTransfer If you need to limit the download bandwidth ...


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Iperf has no logic to maximize the efficiency of UDP traffic over a WAN link. Windows, like most modern operating systems, has gone to significant effort to get every possible drop of TCP throughput possible. TCP has acknowledgements that adjust a window, sophisticated transmit pacing, and so on. Iperf is just sending the UDP packets at regular intervals. ...


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I managed to resolve the problem. I think Windows Update messed up. What I did was make a liveUSB running a distro of Linux (any should do) and boot using that, using the Linux file manager, I just renamed the folder SoftwareDistribution which is in C:\Windows\ folder and rebooted back to Windows. After that, it no longer happened.


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Looking at that raw packet screenshot, your packets look to have essentially no payload. I imagine that your PC is sending an enormous amount of tiny packets which is crippling your network devices and capping out at 4mbps. You should send packets with a real TCP/UDP payload to accurately measure network throughput. I realise you have have specific ...


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You can use WhatPulse: Free Linux/Win/Mac It records the network use Stats are available online as well as on the desktop client. Support several computers On each computer: Stats online:



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