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4

You shouldn't have to - looking at the specs for the microserver, it probably has UEFI (it's a semi-modern core i3 or i5 - and those have never come with bios). It might have an 'old school' text interface for the bios but that's fine. The system apparently officially supports 4tb drives anyway. If you wanted to do an exotic boot, and wanted a seperate ...


3

This might be a hairline crack on your PCB, which might have been produced by stresses on the power button. Sometimes, when the conducting copper itself has a crack, thermal expansion of the PCB will break the connection when it's warm, and make the connection when it's cold. Your description that "it's just a brick that doesn't even make it to the BIOS" ...


3

Yes, GPT works fine with most BIOSes – as the BIOS boot process really only involves running the bootcode in sector 0, and it's up to that bootcode to actually interpret whatever partition table it needs. (For example, syslinux has separate MBR & GPT versions of the bootcode, and LILO just hardcodes the offsets instead.) Similarly, it's up to the ...


2

Ram shows up reduced when you have an integrated (onboard) GPU. If you're not using it, disable it from BIOS. After that it should show 512 MB.


2

Debian will install and boot just fine on a GPT partitioned disk in a BIOS booting system. All it requires is a 1 mb bios_grub partition.


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1.System Password: This will be prompted before the system can boot up, and load the operating system. 2.Setup password: The system will prompt for this password only when you are trying to access the BIOS settings. Source Here are your manuals for the Dell Inspiron 11 (3147)


1

The first and obvious question I have to ask is: Are you sure that the actual BIOS ROM is corrupt and not just the CMOS memory? Have you tried resetting CMOS? There should be a jumper on the motherboard (I assume you have the ability to open the chassis as you're going to pry out the BIOS chip). If you can't find the jumper there should be a round batter ...


1

Boot into your BIOS and and make sure onboard RAID is enabled. Perhaps you disabled it by accident? Its highly unlikely that changing graphics cards would cause the issue. If it is disabled, enable it - obviously. If it enabled, it is possible the graphics card's BIOS could prevent you from seeing it... still not likely, but replace the card to be sure.


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Looks like it is just broken. As @Ramhound said in the comments, BIOS will not take care of the internals of the GPU. The fan working tells you the GPU has power, but no more. It actually neglects issues regarding the GPU not being powered properly. If the GPU was working before and now it makes your motherboard not to start due to problems, I would ...


1

Some ideas occur to me: Remove the hard disk -- If you remove all bootable media from the computer, including your hard disk, it will probably drop back to the firmware setup utility when you start it up. If your laptop makes it hard do remove the hard disk, this might not be a good option; but if you've got easy access to the hard disk, this solution ...


1

Intel Virtualization Technology (VT). Formerly known as Vanderpool, this technology enables a CPU to act as if you have several independent computers, in order to enable several operating systems to run at the same time on the same machine. In this tutorial we will explain everything you need to know about this technology. Intel’s virtualization technology ...


1

If your BIOS does not support booting from a USB drive, you could try installing the Plop Bootloader. It will add a entry to your boot menu where you can boot from a USB.


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Is TianoCore+coreboot a true open source UEFI? For Intel platforms(I have done development for Intel boards and I cannot speak for AMD though I believe the case is still the same), no, because TianoCore by itself cannot perform low level hardware initialization and requires Coreboot to do this hardware init first. But how does Coreboot do this? Coreboot ...


1

They should show up in BIOS, even if configured as RAID. Something has to be able to see them, right? Since they don't show in BIOS, on both computers, there must be either something wrong with the drives, something wrong with the cables, something wrong with the ports/motherboard (x2), or a BIOS setting issue (x2). An issue with the drives is definitely ...


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Never mind guys. The only thing i should have done is pressing del very quickly before the POST screen even appears:)


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Maybe, it is a boot priority setting problem (I had that once). Try pressing F1 and go to the boot priority setting (there are plenty of tutorials). If your HDD or SSD is not listed, it is a hard drive failure. If your HDD or SSD IS listed, manually shut it down (power button) and press F2.



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