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First, understand that x86 hardware has an Interrupt Descriptor Table that lives in RAM. On the original 8086 CPU this was fixed at memory location 0, the first location of RAM, but it can be moved in later and modern CPUs. The BIOS initially sets this up at memory location 0. The IDT is a list of 32-bit pointers to routines elsewhere in memory (which ...


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After hours of searching I decided to trust this link (as Ramhound suggested) to update my bios. A great help was this little page over here !!! Also, the problem solved. I don't have black screen anymore. The problem is that the first link I gave you is in Turkish so you have to translate it. You could use Google Translate but to save you the time I will ...


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I had the clock problem when I was dual-booting Windows 7 and Fedora 18. I don't think it's BIOS related, but rather a Linux setting relating to time-zone offset. I seem to recall there was a setting for the system clock to use UTC or local time in System > Administration > Date/Time. If you can't find it, try this: hwclock -w --localtime


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Make sure sure your memory is compatible with the following: Dual channel, 2 slots, Non-ECC, 240-pin DDR2, Un-buffered Types: 667/PC2-5300, 800/PC2-6400 Source IPM31 Motherboard layout reference


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Based on the symptoms you describe it sounds like your OS has USB 2.0 drivers but not USB 3.0 drivers. I found a good summary on a post by tonymac user a6f691ac: XHCI Mode = Disabled - The on-board USB 3.0 port function like a 2.0 port XHCI Mode = Enabled - The on-board USB 3.0 port function like a 3.0 port XHCI Mode = Auto - The ...


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Basically, there's a ROM (read only memory) chip on the motherboard that tells it how to display whatever GUI it needs to. You think of it as having no software, but it does, it comes preinstalled from the manufacturer. Actually, you'd more likely call this "firmware" since it's software that's hard wired to the chip. As for graphical desktop environments, ...


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Yes, it's fine. Visualization just allows your computer to respond to a specific process in a certain way. By all means, it's fine.


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You didn't specify what your hardware is, but some pc's have an onboard graphics that shares some hardware resources with the motherboard - such as main memory. If you have stacked up a lot of processes in memory, than going in full screen mode can tax the available memory, causing swapping and other inefficiencies that can lead to a cpu running close to ...


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The fan controller knows when to speed us to keep the temp at 55. The fan will start to spin to prevent it from climbing. It doesn't kick in at the critical temp because it wouldn't be able to cool it down quick enough. the fact your temp is staying around 50 means the fan is doing what it should be doing. Go buy a silent fan. You shouldn't be lowering fan ...


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Ahh, Just figured it out. I tried to uninstall the nvidia driver, but windows just reinstalled it again. so I navigated to the device manager, and under IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers, I selected the driver and hit update, and selected from a list of reinstalled drivers, and selected ATA 1, (The standard windows driver), And it fixed it. After several days of ...


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1-3-1 through 2-4-4 Memory modules not being properly identified or used Source Beep Codes and PSA Diagnostic Chart


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AFUDOS obviously calls AFUDOS.exe, but what does the @ do and why is it not necessary to specify the file extension? The @ causes the command not to be echoed to the screen before it's executed. The extension doesn't need to be specified because that is the DOS way. Otherwise, you'd have to know whether a command was built in or not in order to execute ...



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