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48

Both. CMOS stores BIOS configuration information. When you "enter setup", you are running the BIOS's configuration program, which loads the settings defined in CMOS. You are "setting up" the CMOS, by providing configuration information the BIOS will use as it runs. The BIOS is a program written as Firmware onto a ROM, so it cannot be written to (except by ...


23

You can simply flash the latest version of the BIOS. The firmware is always provided as a full image that overwrites the old one, not as a patch, so the latest version will contain all the fixes and features that were added in the previous versions. There is no need for an incremental update.


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My USB won't boot I am going to assume that this means an USB pen drive (and not a USB printer, USB scanner, USB network card....) This can have several reasons: The device is not bootable. The deivce is not bootable unless it was present early. The computer does not support booting from that type. The computer does not support booting from that ...


5

"I tried pressing F12 to select devices, but nothing happens." F12 does not seem to be the correct key ... Source BIOS Access Keys for Sony, Lenovo, Toshiba, Dell, Gateway, and More! Sony VAIO, PCG-Series, VGN-Series Press F1, F2 or F3 after turning on the computer.


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You need to change your boot sequence. Some laptops require you to prioritise the boot sequence. Make it in this order: Removable devices Hard Drive CD-ROM If this option can be disabled then do it


3

500W is a recommendation, but your system will most likely use much less than that. Anandtech's review of the 270X shows around 250W while gaming, and under 300W max running FurMark. There are many other reviews along these lines. The Corsair VS450 isn't the greatest PSU in the world, but should power the 270X. Seeing that other GPUs work with the ...


2

BIOS stands for Basic Input Output System and CMOS stands for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor. The BIOS system is written onto the CMOS microchip. You can't have a BIOS without a CMOS to hold it, so it's not uncommon for the two terms to be used interchangeably.


2

This doesn't sound like a hardware problem if everything is functioning normally once startup completes. But, if you can't move the mouse cursor while the screen is black, it could very well point to hardware. I suspect software, particularly a third-party application such as anti-virus. I would begin troubleshooting this with removing programs from the ...


2

Colleague “A” is 100% correct: Wake-on-LAN (WoL) functionality dependent on the motherboard and related BIOS settings. The NIC should be able to support WoL and the BIOS needs to be able to make sense of the NIC saying, “Hey! This is your NIC and my WoL has been triggered! Do you care do do something with this info, motherboard?” As explained very clearly ...


2

@Zuck's answer is fine, but much quicker via the Command Line Interface (CLI). Open up cmd as Administrator then run: reg ADD HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\TimeZoneInformation /t REG_DWORD /v RealTimeIsUniversal /d 1


2

What you listen is the power on self test, POST for the friends. The computer power-on self-test (POST) tests the computer to make sure it meets the necessary system requirements and that all hardware is working properly before starting the remainder of the boot process. You said something like... well the like is important, it is the message that ...


1

I manage to get it working! Problem was those Entrys (#0-2), there was same Entry (#1) for TDP and 3D Clock. I changed TDP to use Entry #1, 3D to use Entry #2 and Boost to use Entry #0. Then I changed 3D clock to 1280MHz and that's it. Now it runs smooth at 1280MHz and boosts it down for a while when not needed. So actually, the only problem was the user ...


1

There might be a problem with the creation of the boot pendrive. See this article : How to Create a Bootable UEFI USB Flash Drive for Installing Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 8.1 On how to : Create a Bootable UEFI USB Flash Drive using Free Program Rufus Manually Create a Bootable UEFI USB Flash Drive


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CPU: Core i7-4790K (4.0Ghz, 4C, HT, L3:8M, HD Graphic, 88W, rev.C0) Since PCB: All BIOS Revision: 2001 Note: Before using the new Intel 4th Gen Core processors, we suggest that you first download the BIOS updater for new Intel 4th Gen Core Processors and then update the BIOS using this tool. Source You will have to determine the ...


1

The battery is there to keep the clock running. Settings on new FLASH BIOS can be stored on non-volatile flash memory inside the BIOS chips and a battery pull will not reset them. The proper way to reset the BIOS is to program it to reset and that implies following the manual. Use a jumper cap to short out the CLR_CMOS pins. (On your mainboard, those pins ...


1

What is present at first boot is the factory default settings. These may not be optimal, but are the settings that are most likely to work for "everyone" during first boot, so that they can later go in and tweak the BIOS settings as they please. These settings are usually stored in CMOS memory, and kept there by the small battery that you can see on the ...


1

If you enter the BIOS. F10 on your model and go to the Advanced tab you will see Power On Options. This will enable you to modify your post settings. The two that will probably be most useful to you are POST Mode (QuickBoot, FullBoot, CLear Memory and FullBoot Every x Days) and POST Delay. With these settings you should be able to configure your boot up to ...


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After POST (i.e. could be in the OS), if there is a power failure, it can result in this message. eg: a device that was in use at the time of the power failure and thus affected by it might fail to initialize and prevent successful POST attempts.


1

Yes, if the motherboard manufacturer doesn't provide a way to update the BIOS via Linux you can try using a Windows LiveCD/USB instead. As per my experience though some BIOS updaters do refuse to launch under WinPE (should work fine with Windows To Go but I've never tested this). However if there is a DOS-based option available I would advise you to use ...


1

Sometimes it helps to create a "Stuck key" situation. Keep an arbitrary key pressed while the laptop boots. It will think the keyboard is faulty and give an erro-message about that. Then it may allow you to get into the bios. ("Press F1 to continue, F2 for Bios setup" or something to that effect.)


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You have to hit F9 during bootup. If you miss the right point, shut your laptop off, begin pressing the F9 key continously and then start your laptop. You can't miss it that way.


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If the BIOS and the USB ways do not work, you might be able to extract the HD (using a screwdriver), then connect it via an adapter to another pc, and do the install from that PC. When that is finished, just reinstall the hd.


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Other option is to obtain a USB-to-SATA interface (Cheap enough on Ebay) and boot from a desktop CDROM drive connected to this and a 5v/12v psu. That will almost always work even if flash ram boot will not.


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Unfortunately your processor the Core 2 Duo E7200 does not supports Intel's Virtualization Technology (VT-x). You can check it here. As for the chipset of the motherboard that you have mentioned, the P43 Express Chipset does not supports Intel's Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) either. You can confirm it from here.



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