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11

Looks like the battery backing up the BIOS settings is dead. Replace the battery should help.


3

Your motherboard is old so it's likely the internal battery the problem. This is the battery: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CR2032_battery You can find it, usually, in place like Auchan or Tesco (cheap) or in a computer shop. Here you can see where is the battery: http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P5QLVM_EPU/gallery/ in the first image is located just under ...


3

I have the same exact motherboard and this error is familiar to me. Indeed you have a bad battery on that board. It can't keep the BIOS settings saved anymore. You need to replace it with a new one for this message to stop appearing. Or ignore this message altogether if you don't need any non-default settings, it's safe like that. (at least nothing happened ...


3

Acer usually disables this option on ther mid-tier laptops. First of all try a BIOS update, later versions may have it enabled. If you want it enabled even if the manufacturer doesn't want you to, you can probably flash a modified BIOS, but this is VERY RISKY BUSINESS. You will probably void your warranty, may end up with broken notebook, get yourself a ...


2

This is how I solved the problem. Some of the steps may be redundant. I made sure that the SSD to be used for acceleration was set up as an MBR disk. I made sure that the SSD did not have any partitions. I shrunk my OS partition to half its size. After I did those I ran the Intel RST software again, and it showed me an "acceleration" option. I enabled ...


2

UEFI is perfectly capable of booting BIOS-bootable operating systems, using the so called “Compatibility Support Module” (CSM), which emulates all the necessary stuff. And no, you cannot simply flash whatever you like. The firmware/BIOS is created specifically for your device. Unless the manufacturer provides a legacy BIOS firmware (he won’t), you’re stuck ...


1

This is a known bug with Samsung's implementation of UEFI on certain notebooks. You can know more about this by googling "Samsung UEFI bug". It's been mentioned in several places like in this Ubuntu CD Image bug report and this Wikipedia article In his online journal, Matthew Garret explains the problem with Samsung's UEFI implementation: The problem ...


1

Make sure to select Legacy Boot or UEFI in the BIOS depending on the type you want to boot.* Select ATAPI CD0 HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GU90N in that list. Alternatively, put that entry first in the BIOS to automatically boot to it. If it doesn't work, there may be a problem with your installation medium. (* For Linux it likely is Legacy Boot that you want.)


1

First step would be to examine the card thoroughly for any visible physical damage. This could be along the lines of: bent or broken 'pins' on the PCIe connector scratches or damages to the PCB (circuit board) that could be causing a short circuit visible signs of heat damage (burnt parts and/or melted plastic) loose components (not likely in this case) ...


1

Windows 10 still supports old legacy BIOS. UEFI is not required. If you have GRUB running, the boot installation may override GRUB. In this case, install a Virtual Machine under Linux.


1

I realize this is an older post but I was having the same/similar problem and in hopes of helping someone else in the future I am adding my resolution here. After doing some research and trying to figure this out I found an article online that mentioned holding ESC while using the power button to turn on the computer. After further testing I figured out ...


1

You can put Windows 8.1 x86-x64 AIO on a USB stick and it will boot. You have the option of selecting between the 32 bit and the 64 bit Windows installation. If you select the 64 bit option it will try to install it, given that your device has a 64 bit processor, but since it has a 32 bit UEFI firmware, winload.efi will crack because it expects a 64 bit ...


1

Until you get it fixed, a workaround might the on-screen keyboard, http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/type-with-the-on-screen-keyboard. You might try downloading the drivers for the keypad and/or keyboard from the Toshiba site, http://support.toshiba.com/ and reinstalling them.


1

I would suggest it is a personal choice, based typically around security. Speaking as a domestic user, I have never had any serious security problems, since my first use of Windows way back. I ensure that any critical items, such as bank accounts, are secured by other means - certainly not left on an unattended computer. On that premise, I find the UEFI ...


1

You won't find a CMOS reset jumper on any modern laptop. I think you'll have to reset the BIOS. open the laptop, remove the CMOS battery and wait for the BIOS to reset to defaults. make sure you also disconnect battery and PSU for this to work after a while (1 or 2 minutes) plug everything back in and boot the machine back up. now go into BIOS and restore ...


1

Try this: Read "To temporarily add a boot parameter to a kernel" at http://askubuntu.com/a/19487/289138 NOTE: this might well require doing it for every (re)boot during the installation process and later require to have it added permanently using the description below the temporary method (link above). Replace foo=bar in the description with ...


1

According to the dmp file, the csrss.exe gets closed because of an IO Error: (NTSTATUS) 0xc0000006 - STATUS_IN_PAGE_ERROR # The instruction at 0x%p referenced memory at 0x%p. The # required data was not placed into memory because of an I/O # error status of 0x%x. this causes your Windows to shut down. ...


1

How do I enable virtualization on my Sony Vaio? Make sure the computer is turned off. Turn on the computer using the ASSIST button not the power button. Press F2 to enter the Bios. Select the Advanced tab in the Bios to enable Virtualization. Note: Sony has disabled hardware virtualization on some laptops by providing these laptops with a Bios that does ...


1

I'm sorry for your situation. A Corrupted BIOS firmware is probably one of the most troublesome and scariest experience for any PC user. But you will be glad to know that there is still hope even on such a dead end. Reprogramming your BIOS firmware by forcing a BIOS crisis recovery on your machine may be your last option. Basically you can force a BIOS flash ...



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