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In the bios / advanced / OS configuration there is the following option "Enable USB configuration for windows 7". I choose that and it works.


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Locate CMOS battery, and disconnect battery for 15-20 seconds, that should clear the BIOS password.


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I had the same problem with a Gigabyte P55-UD5 mainboard. With the default MS driver some internal drives showed as removable. Because the drivers on Gigabyte's site were very old I used this post to find the newest one (in my case: 64bit Intel RST(e) AHCI/RAID Drivers v12.9.4.1000) and installed it via Device Manager, update driver.


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Sounds like an intermittent hardware problem. As Ben suggested. Since it's a laptop you can't really test with a new SATA cable and port on the board. As a guess I'd say that the SSD has failed. As easy test would be to swap in the old drive, or use a linux live CD and see if it's mountable.


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The "no bootable device" failure has always historically indicated whether or not the system found a disk with a bootable partition present. At boot, the BIOS will obtain a record of all devices that could potentially contain bootable media. It will go through this list in a particular order, and once it finds one containing a Master Boot Record (MBR) ...


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Did you just upgrade the OS to a new higher OS? If do, then better to refresh your operating system by reformatting first, then install new OS, deep reformat will be better.


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Delete Toshiba Hotkey from Programs & Features in Control Panel. That's what finality brought my keyboard back but it seems to reinstall via updates because I've had to do it several times


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Yes, you can install windows 8 without secure boot. You can also dual boot, though Ive not done this so I'm not sure how win8 goes about asking which drive to install on...


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Do you have a USB plugged in, if yes then just unplug it. Otherwise there should be an option in BIOS settings to boot off your hard drive before trying a USB.


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Have you tried flashing a USB with a Linux and booting off of that instead of the computers hard drive? If it works, you would have full access to the system and might be able to fix the problem from there. If you want to try that, a simple Google search for "live Linux USB" should get you good results. Ubuntu mate is my personal favorite, and I actually ...


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The motherboard chipset supports only 2 GB modules. 4 GB modules are not supported. Please refer the specifications here 4 x 1.8V DDR2 DIMM sockets supporting up to 8 GB of system memory


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Question: How do you work around the UEFI BIOS issues present in Phoenix and Samsung devices where the boot process cannot be interrupted as expected with either the F2 or F10 Keys? Context: Also Effects: Phoenix BIOS P06AAE, Samsung NP700Z7C (NP700Z7C-S01US) On Samsung computers, a Phoenix BIOS is present with the option to change the BIOS mode from ...


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Try to enable "USB emulation" in "Advance": h


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When you install an OS from external media, like USB for example, you have two options how to boot media (on UEFI capable firmware): UEFI way BIOS/legacy way For GPT disks (not MBR style disks!) choose always UEFI way of booting - then installer for any OS (Windows, Linux, etc.) should create installation which is UEFI bootable (boot files are stored to ...


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If you have a bootable USB stick or DVD (like a Linux Live CD/USB or a Windows CD) you can easily format what you desire. Through the motherboard BIOS you can't manage partitions etc, only the boot order and only the hardware side of your PC


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Try reinstalling grub on your hard disk MBR. Boot your Kali livecd once more and, from a command line, assuming a single disk drive, type sudo grub-install /dev/sda (this installs it in the mbr), and then type sudo update-grub (this updates the grub menu)


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Does “Legacy Support” really disable my HP's OS? No. It does not disable it. It might not look for it though. There are three ways in which a reasonably modern notebook boots: Firmware with BIOS loaded. It needs an MBR formatted disk to find an active partition on and tries to boot from that. Firmwire with EFI loaded. It boots from a GPT formatted ...


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The terminology is often overlooked (which it shouldn't really be by now, but there we go.) Often the UEFI is referred to as the BIOS, when really it should be called the UEFI or at least the system firmware. According to this source, your machine has a UEFI firmware: HP Commercial Notebook PCs - Basic Input Output System (BIOS) Updates (EDK2 UEFI ...


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You could try removing and reseating the cable for the actual keyboard and see if the problem exist exactly. I would recommend a keyboard replacement.


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EFIs support programs, including boot loaders, of like bit depth. In other words, an x86-64 (aka AMD64, x64, or EM64T) EFI can launch a 64-bit binary, which normally has a filename ending in x64.efi; and an x86 (aka IA32, i686 or related) EFI can launch a 32-bit binary, which normally has a filename ending in ia32.efi. Note that, if you have a 32-bit EFI, ...


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As mentioned, it could as well be a hardware bug, so you should try using it with an external keyboard first to check that. If you can rule that out, it could be a bootkit. If flashing the BIOS didn't help and you want to be 100% sure, download the latest BIOS flash from Sony and reinstall your BIOS completely via USB. That should pretty much do it. ...


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Most of the folks will recommend flashing the BIOS only if there is a specific need, and on the Gigabyte boards, using the QFlash appl after downloading the BIOS file on a floppy or USB flash drive. Few will recommend using the Windows @BIOS because of problems and risk of updating with that utility. Are you able to get to your BIOS splash screen before the ...


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BIOS limits are per-device. It shouldn't be a problem.


-1

larger than 2tb hard drives require them to be formatted in GPT format, and if you wish to use them as a primary boot drive you must make sure your mobo supports UEFI or unified extensible firmware interface.. thats a mouthful.


1

Bit late for an answer (2 years) but anyway... you have to change the boot order in BIOS by pressing F10 at startup (not just via F9, despite what the menu suggests).


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This BIOS version changelog can be found here ENHANCEMENTS: Adds support for full-speed hubs with endpoint numbers greater than 1. FIXES: Fixes an issue where the system stops responding (hangs) while Microsoft Windows is loading when keys are pressed and multiple keyboards are present. The BIOS now checks USB UHCI ...


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You can easily run above 1600mHz. Download the manual for the board. I'm currently running 1800mH , I have been for 6 years. Change the settings manually, still retaining default voltages, or using XMP or D.O.H.C settings in the bios. Cheers


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To boot to Win10 from a flash drive, you need to have UEFI boot enabled for the USB device in the BIOS. Legacy won't work. What's happening is that it's ignoring the boot options because it's detecting only the hard drive as valid UEFI boot device. Lenovo suggests disabling "safe boot" in the BIOS and pushing F12 to manually bring up the boot menu as the ...


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To elaborate on grawity's answer, there are several issues, of varying degrees of relevance, to your question: UGA vs. GOP -- As you say, there are two EFI video systems, UGA and GOP. The latter was introduced with EFI 2.x (aka UEFI), IIRC, and AFAIK all UEFI-based systems use GOP. In principle, all EFI 1.x systems should use UGA; however, Apple (which ...


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yes, but. You would need to know technical details about the on-drive logic and programming that is not publicly available (and probably considered confidential by the manufacturer). So if you work for the manufacturer, you might be able to get this info and start replacing the code in the on-board chips; otherwise - if you are not the government - you will ...


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After updating the BIOS you need to reset it to default values because often old values don't map properly to new settings, which is why it is incorrectly reading the CPU voltage. Choose load bios defaults or the equivalent in your BIOS, reboot, and then check it. Should be fine.


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Laptops have a ROM to the same extent as servers do (but in reality neither have ROM anymore - ROM = Read-Only Memory, ROM has been replaced with NVRAM - Nonvolatile RAM, which acts like ROM most of the time, except it allows you to upgrade it if you need to).


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Easy solution (Win.10).. Control Panel>Power Options>...top left "choose what the power buttons do">change settings that are currently available>...then UN-check "Turn on Fast Startup". Shut down and re start....problem should be solved.


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The way i was able to fix it was taking apart my laptop ( a series 5) removing the CMOS battery (its a little black circle connected by a red and black wire located above the ram slot to the right) and waiting a minute and putting it all back together. This reset by UEIF to defaults and booted me back up into windows.


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After few days of waiting I have got an answer from AsRock tech support Due to limitation of Windows 7 MBR, its limited to 2 TB (refers to Microsoft). UEFI mode installation could works with 2 TB or larger . (Windows 8.1 /10 comes with UEFI mode). To set up RAID, please try below. Delete the RAID in the BIOS (if applied). Load the ...


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Another possible avenue: I have a Dell XPS 730 (BIOS firmware 1.0.6) with Windows 10 Pro. I had the Virtualization "enabled" in the BIOS, and Windows would not recognize the firmware as having it enabled (witnessed by running "MSINFO32" on a command prompt.) I had to un-enable it in the BIOS, boot into windows, then re-enable it in the BIOS for windows to ...


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In order to enter BIOS, you need to hold F2 or Del. If your keyboard isn't working, use a known good USB piece. (Note that some computers don't work SETUP with an USB keyboard. If your computer is old, and it has PS/2 ports, it may not support USB until after Del time). If you see the blue "welcome" screen, then the system has loaded. That screen is there ...


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Your computer has probably UEFI firmware. CSM (in your image) means legacy BIOS booting. Your best bet would be to disable CSM and, if Windows was in BIOS mode and now fails to boot, reinstall Windows with proper UEFI support.



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