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5

The message you get is from the BIOS which checks the drives SMART status. This is probably reporting many reallocated sectors. Usually this means the drive is failing. Reinstalling the OS or repartitioning does not help with that. You can do clever tricks like scanning the drive, locating groups of failed sectors and partitioning in around them but the ...


5

Although I can add program in Schedule Task, or use other app to start this exe file successfully on startup, I wonder if there is anyway to start it directly. Run it as a Scheduled Task "at log on" rather than "on startup."


3

By default, a Windows 8/8.1 shutdown is not a real shutdown. Instead, it is hybrid shutdown where contents of memory are saved to disk. This allows for a faster startup. However, turning on the PC after a hybrid shutdown does not allow for pressing F1 or F12 during startup. Solution: There are several ways to enter Setup Utility (F1) or the Boot Menu ...


3

When your PC boots, the BIOS has to enumerate USB devices. If there is a problem with this process, such as: Cheap flash drive doesn't quite obey the USB standard, Device that looks like a flash drive (such as mp3 player or picture frame) to the OS doesn't quite obey the USB standard, Device is actually multiple USB storage devices (some have a device ...


3

Option 1: Restart your Windows 8 PC (shutdown /r). Option 2: Disable Fast StartUp in Windows.


2

Source Clock So, what is clock anyway? Clock is a signal used to sync things inside the computer. Take a look at Figure 2, where we show a typical clock signal: it is a square wave changing from “0” to “1” at a fixed rate. On this figure you can see three full clock cycles (“ticks”). The beginning of each cycle is when the clock signal goes from ...


2

Use a VM like VMware workstation and you will be able to do the same


2

Unlike flash memory, the BIOS settings non-volatile memory (which has, at least historically, often been implemented using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, hence the "CMOS memory" nickname) gets cleared if power is removed from it. A small battery connected to the motherboard provides power when external power is removed from the ...


2

The command tasklist in Windows Command Prompt shows a static snapshot of all running programs and services, but it sounds like you need a process monitoring program. Sysinternals.com (on Microsoft Technet) has a free process monitor you can customize with your own filtering rules. Sysinternals.com also has a Startup Monitor called Autoruns (also on ...


2

you don't need a live cd to solve this, since most people are afraid of the grub command line, i will post this : grub> ls ( here you should see a list of devices/partitions ) now we must find the partition that contains /boot grub> ls (hd0,gpt1)/ # you may see msdos instead of gpt and the slash is necessary if this is the right partition we should see : ...


2

Check the CD or DVD you're trying to boot from. Does it boot any other computer correctly? If not, the disc may not be bootable. If it does work, the optical drive may be defective.


1

After all what happened, when you turn on your PC, the computer briefly starts, then stops, nothing happens but green light on motherboard is on? Sounds like power is not coming through. Try taking out RAM and boot up, if it's RAM fault, it should give you beeping errors; if it's same with RAM out, unplug and replug all connectors from PSU. Also, just for ...


1

You can interact with systemd services through the systemctl command. If your package management system has provided a systemd service file with the ddclient package then you can start the service with: [sudo] systemctl start ddclient.service And query the status of the service with: [sudo] systemctl status ddclient.service Note: systemctl start ...


1

There are a few of things wrong with what is occurring, and that is: UEFI and Windows 7 USB 3.0 Fast Boot Now, for #1, Windows 7 doesn't actually support full UEFI mode, and will crash at loading the BCD. To fix this, you need to either Enable UEFI with CSM (Compatibility Support Module) OR Enable Legacy Boot, i.e. BIOS. As for #2, Windows 7 doesn't ...


1

The reason it freezes is because when your PC boots, it looks for things to boot from, and eventually boots from your HDD, loading windows, etc. What's happening is: your PC is trying to boot an OS from your USB flash, and is freezing because there's no OS to boot. You may be able to force it to look to the HDD first by editing the BIOS.


1

The problem probably comes from using Universal USB Installer and Rufus. Please try using Tails Installer instead: Machine > Settings > Storage > CD/DVD Rive > Choose a virtual CD/DVD disk file... Open the tails-i386-[version].iso file you downloaded and boot from that. Start Tails. When you started go Application > Tails > Tails Installer, then use Clone ...


1

If you PXE boot UEFI hardware into an NBP (Network Boot Program) that is not UEFI compliant you will not be able to boot in native UEFI mode and your only choice would be the "Legacy Mode" try to see what WDS is providing as NBP and check if this is UEFI or Legacy. WDS detects your client's architecture and BIOS/UEFI mode using a DHCP option provided by ...


1

Your computer has 1GB RAM which is enough to handle Ubuntu 32-bit clumsily, but Ubuntu is too heavy for your computer so your performance will be slow, particularly in web browsers. For better performance you should install Xubuntu 14.04 32-bit instead which has the lightweight Xfce desktop environment. The Xfce desktop environment will free up more of the ...


1

I think that your best option is just to clone the content of your old HDD to the new one. There are free tools like Clonezilla to perform this task. It is advised to run it from a live media (CD or USB), in the end of the process the whole HDD would be cloned, and its contents would be exactly as the old one.


1

Close the laptop (then the display will only be sent to the external monitor). Use a USB keyboard and mouse to diagnose the issue.


1

Yup, that weird entry in grubenv was the issue. I renamed the file and rebooted and I have gloriously full grub2 functionality again. Thanks for rubber-ducking, SuperUsers.


1

Have you tried using the rEFInd Boot Manager? There's a good guide at https://wiki.debian.org/GrubEFIReinstall. rEFInd will parse your hard drive for installed kernels, and provide you a graphic menu to boot them. I combed the net for a bit on this issue as I had the same problem once but I can't for the life of me remember how I fixed it (I still can't). ...


1

This issue surrounds that I have a 64 bit system, meaning OpenVPN client was installed in Program Files, as opposed to Program Files (x86); simply changing from Program Files (x86) to Program Files fixed this issue.


1

This could be any number of problems. Possibility 1: Your power supply could be fried. This is less likely though, because if it were a problem with your power supply, then the computer wouldn't come on at all. Possibility 2: Your motherboard is broken. This is more likely. Because of the many components on a motherboard, if a single one stops working, ...


1

You have to modify the "BCD", the "boot configuration database", which is in your system partition (it's called "system", not "boot" - the "boot" partition is the one the OS lives on; Disk Manager will confirm this). You were correct to not "restore" the system partition to "dest". You make the needed changes with bcdedit, a command-line tool included with ...


1

There is no such service. There never was, either. The only thing that could cause problems is Windows not having a driver for the storage controller the drive is connected to. With virtually everything being AHCI, it's mostly a non-issue today, though.


1

Create a Scheduled Task. Rather than triggering at a specific time, you trigger it at log on. In the "Create Task" dialog, select the following: General (tab) - "Run with highest privileges" Triggers (tab) - New (button) - Begin the task - "At log on" This worked for me with a command prompt.


1

Windows boot files are either on active partition in case of MBR disk or on EFI System Partition in case of GPT disk. A. In the case of UEFI boot and GPT disk you can delete the partition of the OS you want to remove without problem. A.1. If the OS to be removed is Windows - you have to delete also the corresponding BCD entry for loading that OS. A.2. ...


1

Uninstalling any one OS in dual boot system can be done simple. Have a look on uninstall windows 7 on a multiboot system


1

NVMe boot support is required. If your motherboard does not support it, then you won't be able to boot from a NVMe drive.



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