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17

Windows 8 has "Hybrid Shutdown" enabled by default. In this mode, Windows doesn't shut down after logging you out, but enters hibernation. (Except when rebooting.) Disabling hibernation forces Windows to revert to fully shutting down and booting up.


5

The proper way to do this is sysprep or System Preparation. Here's what you need to do: C:\Windows\System32\sysprep\sysprep.exe /oobe /generalize /shutdown This: Enters the Out Of Box Experience state Generalizes the OS, removing PC specific HW IDs Shuts the PC down once finished


4

The answer is yes, the new battery may have been faulty. It is also yes, the motherboard could be faulty.. We simply can't asnwer this question! The only way to know is for you to buy a brand new battery. Test it. You will then have your answer. Also, as BigChris mentions in the comments, the battery could easily have lost charge through self-dischage. ...


4

What happens between Power On and the CPU initializing? Hardware Power Sequences: The Pre-Pre-Boot When someone pushes the power button, the CPU can't simply jump up and start fetching code from flash memory. When external power is first applied, the hardware platform must carry out a number of tasks before the processor can be brought out of ...


3

Option 1: Restart your Windows 8 PC (shutdown /r). Option 2: Disable Fast StartUp in Windows.


3

It starts after logon. I think this may be because it needs to start up explorer.exe to find out what is in the start up folder. However you can start scripts during the boot more can be read here: http://www.howtogeek.com/138159/how-to-enable-programs-and-custom-scripts-to-run-at-boot/


3

This might be a hairline crack on your PCB, which might have been produced by stresses on the power button. Sometimes, when the conducting copper itself has a crack, thermal expansion of the PCB will break the connection when it's warm, and make the connection when it's cold. Your description that "it's just a brick that doesn't even make it to the BIOS" ...


2

In the late 1970's there was the Intertec Superbrain, a Z80 based CP/M offering. One the features was "Phantom Boot ROM". It did not have to run through a full boot, as a "saved" state existed. It was an "instant on" machine. Similarly, on z/OS mainframes, CICS transaction server instances can be "warm started" or "cold started". A warm start begins from a ...


2

I've used Ubuntu to repair many MBR issues with Windows drives. Boot from a USB with Ubuntu installed: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows Install Boot-Repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair On the Main Options screen of the Boot-Repair GUI is the checkbox "Restore MBR". Another link if you want more ...


2

Boot from a Windows 7 Install/Repair disk. Even if it can't detect your Windows installation, you should still be able to get to command prompt to fix the MBR. Once you're there, use DiskPart to activate the volume you want to repair. Type the following (line return = enter. Be sure to replace the "X"): diskpart List vol select vol X (Where X is the ...


2

To change the amount of time a list of operating systems displays for on recovery, follow these steps: Boot to Windows Open Start Open Control Panel Switch to one of the Icon views (Large Icons or Small Icons) Select "System" In the System window - Select "Advanced System Settings" In the "Advanced System Properties" popup - Select the "Advanced" tab. ...


1

What you can do is called resetting the NVRAM (non-volatile random access memory). Resetting NVRAM Shut down your Mac. Locate the following keys on the keyboard: Command (⌘), Option, P, and R. Turn on your Mac. Press and hold the Command-Option-P-R keys immediately after you hear the startup sound. Hold these keys until the computer ...


1

Yes, you can share the /boot partition with multiple distributions, but it's not trivial. In order to avoid possible conflicts I'd only use ONE of them (typically the one with the most recent/up2date GRUB version) to "own"/configure/manage it. To prevent accidental damage I'm even mounting it readonly in the "non-owner" distributions (or not mounting it at ...


1

The hard drive with Windows XP and the hard drive with Windows 7 both boot OK on another computer, so that points to a hardware issue as a possible cause of your rebooting problem. Your computer may have a broken RAM stick. When the computer is booting it tries to detect the RAM, and if it fails it sometimes reboots again and once again it tries to detect ...


1

I generally recommend keeping at least two kernels for each Linux distribution. This is especially true when installing a new one; occasionally a new bug creeps in, or a filesystem error occurs, which causes a new kernel to not work. In such cases, having an older kernel around as a backup can greatly simplify recovery. That said, you can limit the number ...


1

Download and install Dual-boot Repair tool in Windows XP. Run it and click on "Automatic Repair". Reboot - Windows 7 should be the default boot choice.


1

If your BIOS does not support booting from a USB drive, you could try installing the Plop Bootloader. It will add a entry to your boot menu where you can boot from a USB.


1

The easiest solution is to use any Linux distribution - put it on USB or DVD. Boot from Linux USB/DVD. You have two choices: Delete the new created partition (if there is nothing important on it else save files on it to USB - do not delete the Windows 7 partition !! Reboot - you should be fine. Use "Boot-repair" from Linux to fix booting (see ...


1

Sadly, there is no upgrade path from retail versions of Windows to Volume Licensed editions. The only way you are going to "upgrade" is to perform a clean install.


1

I had this issue also (I'm on Windows 7, but the issue is identical). Many sources have found that KB2976978 has been re-released numerous times; it's likely that the version of the patch you have is an older release with glitchy behavior. Uninstall it from appwiz.cpl and reboot. Windows Update will re-offer it next time it checks for updates. I went ahead ...


1

If the computer is booting into Windows Recovery Environment you can always access the files and perform backup Both the methods require booting into Windows Recovery Environemt Command Prompt Method : Once booted in Windows Recovery Environment, choose Command Prompt Locate your System disk and backup disk Perform Copy/Move using DOS commands ...


1

Never mind guys. The only thing i should have done is pressing del very quickly before the POST screen even appears:)


1

There were several things wrong after I cloned partitions, none of which I was aware. on Linux several programs rely on device UUID instead of /dev/sdX notation. As a matter of a fact in e.g. /etc/fstab it is the recommended way. In my case that were entries concerning swap partition, as a result initializing script got stuck at mounting it for a while ...


1

windows 8 use fast boot mode it keeps windows 8 in hibernation and block windows partitions. To use these windows partitions stop fast boot mode. This change will give you access to windows partitions but increase time of windows boot.


1

Boot into your BIOS and and make sure onboard RAID is enabled. Perhaps you disabled it by accident? Its highly unlikely that changing graphics cards would cause the issue. If it is disabled, enable it - obviously. If it enabled, it is possible the graphics card's BIOS could prevent you from seeing it... still not likely, but replace the card to be sure.


1

To search for your USB drive, use the root command to choose a drive/partition and the find command to see if you found the right one. You can go through your devices like in this example: grub> root (hd0,0) # first harddrive, first partition grub> find /[tab] # type the slash then press [tab], and it will try to list files on this partition ...


1

I also saw this line when I press F12 at boot: A start job is running for dev-disk-by\x2duuid-c3f3694c\x2d6422\x2d4773\x2da839\x2deac8beb0ec66.device (1min 4s/1min 30s) Perfect!!! This is what I was hoping for!!! This message implies that one of the partitions referenced in /etc/fstab cannot be mounted properly. You should check your fstab file ...


1

First, if you're using the latest version of rEFInd (0.8.7), the instructions you referenced as "LINK" do not apply; as noted in bold at the top of that page: This page is largely obsolete, as of rEFInd 0.8.4. This version of rEFInd makes changes to both its install.sh script and default options to make rEFInd better able to cope with OS X 10.10 without ...


1

What you are looking for is FtpServer.exe and SharpTray.exe, both of which run from HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WoW6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run (at least, on a 64-bit system). It's amazing what you will find running from that location--and none of that stuff shows up in the Startup node of the System Info tool (try using Autoruns from ...


1

Solution: The best and easiest option is to remove your hard drive and connect it to an external HDD enclosure. Connect the external HDD to another computer. Right Click My computer Click manage Select Disk manager Right Click the recovery drive Select "Mark Partition as active" Eject the external HDD from the computer. Remove the HDD and fix it on the ...



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