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3

I see 3 ways Task Scheduler has support to run it both in startup and in login If the path I commented on OP exists you can drop an executable there Registry. Don't do this if you don't know what you're doing, but they're in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>SOFTWARE>Microsoft>Windows>CurrentVersion>Run For a beginner I'd recommend doing task scheduler since it's ...


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Here is my suggestion for your problem: 1 To clarify things, dissconect all the components in your PC from the motherboard. Those are: RAM sticks , the graphics card , all HDD/CD-ROM cables, leaving only the power supply cables on the motherboard . (this is your buzzer) If the PC turns on, try adding one component at a time to identify the problem. ...


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I get a new laptop, I move my harddrive, windows finds all the new drivers etc, and all is wel This only works if windows is able to boot. If your new computer has a different chipset (with incompatible SATA controller) then this will fail. Thus, do three things: Compare firmware (e.g. BIOS) settings on both laptops. Are both set the AHCI? (if ...


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Some BIOSes have a feature called "Power-On by alarm" where you can define the time to wake up the PC. Of course that implies the PC itself is powered. You could then e.g. set up an automated login (SysInternals AutoLogon) and perform any task, including shutdown. Another option is to install a Windows service that runs at boot time, so it executes at the ...


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Probably your MBR and/or bootsector got overwritten. Boot your PC from Vista's DVD and start the command prompt (Repair computer -> Command prompt). Then type BOOTREC /FIXMBR and BOOTREC /FIXBOOT. If that still doesn't help enter command prompt again and type BOOTREC /REBUILDBCD. If you can't boot your PC from DVD for some reason, there is a tool called ...


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If you can only boot through a live CD, i would suppose that you grub is corrupted. Your live CD should have the program "G-parted" installed on it, which should show you your partitions correctly, if you want to change partitions or anything by the like. Now for the booting problem: To get grub back to work, you can do it easily by using boot-repair. The ...


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RAM failure is tricky. If all the RAM modules in your system are faulty which makes the system unable to boot up, you will certainly hear beeps. However, RAM can be faulty in many other ways which compromise your system's stability but don't show outright. It's totally normal for RAM to be faulty and not cause BIOS beep, since when the computer boots, ...


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Windows has a multitude of places where applications or commands can run on startup. There's folders, registry entries etc. there are so many places that msconfig has a Startup tab to try to show you some of them in one place. You mention in the comment you want to have something start when a certain user logs in... and to save messing around with the ...


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How do I run some command when a certain user logs in? You can use the Task Scheduler to create a task that is triggered by a Kernel-Power log event that indicates "Sleep": Run "Task Scheduler". Select "Task Scheduler Library Click menu "Action" > "Create Task" Select "General" and give the task a "Name" and Description" Select "Triggers" and click "New" ...


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Seems like your hard drive is failing. The most important thing you need to do is to backup your important data You need one of the following options: A) Another working PC (where you will install the hard drive as secondary drive) B) Another working hard drive with Windows installed (which you will use to boot in Windows, ...


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Your hard disk is GPT style disk. I don't see EFI system partition(ESP), Microsoft Reserved Partition(MSR) - have you deleted them too ? Also why is the OS partition hidden ? Complete mess. You have 1512 MB free on start of disk there you should create 2 partitions: EFI system partition - at least 100 MB. MSR exactly 128 MB. Use diskpart for creating ...


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I was just about to "bite the bullet" as @moab suggested and do a full reinstall. This is after trying quite a few things and seeing all of them fail, likely for the same reason looking back on it. I intended to, but in the end did not have to, reinstall Windows 10. Here are the key steps. Note: I believe that at least some of my pain, and the particulars ...


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Boot with usb-stick and check your grub.conf. Find the line with root=uuid= and se if it's set to root=UUID=47f89855-8710-4fca-a395-913f70f7d94c. If so, you need to change it to the your primary boot partitions uuid. ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid/ to find the right partition and copy the uuid. if it's root=/dev/sda or something. Change it to ...


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first thing to try is setting default values in the BIOS to see if the drive is recognised then. Secondly, check cable for damage and possbly try another one. Thirdly, I'd attemp a BIOS update which you can find from the motherboard vendor. Additionally, have you access to an external drive caddy which will help to see if the drive can be read from another ...


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Difficult to find out what this cause is, but here a list to begin with Make sure connected cables are well connected. If you can, replace the cable to check if it's damaged Give the BIOS factory settings a try (reset default) Try to boot a live cd (e.g. Ubuntu) and have a look if it sees it It could be your MBR or the boot-manager is damaged (or another ...


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You can go to http://microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 and download the install utility. With this, you can make a bootable usb stick or DVD with the install media from another pc. Create such and use that to install your windows again. If you use the same language and version as your corrupted windows 7 to 10 install, it should still allow ...


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The command in Windows 8/8.1/10 for fixing MBR is "bootsect.exe". bootsect /nt60 drive_letter: /mbr this fixes boot record of partition mapped to "drive_letter:" and the MBR of the disk where the partition is placed. C:\Windows\system32>bootsect bootsect {/help|/nt60|/nt52} {SYS|ALL|<DriveLetter>:} [/force] [/mbr] Boot sector restoration tool ...


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Found the answer. Thanks Psycogeek for the hint that it could be USB related. I have installed the Intel Chipset Utility, even if it says it is only up to Windows 8.1 for now (August 2nd 2015). And now a stick is no longer necessary to boot into Windows. For everyone with this type of problems take a bootlog capture with a bad start and a good start. The ...


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How do I determine what was the version? Take a look inside the user's manual for your laptop model. If you don't know what model it is, take a look at the purchase receipt, or try to locate a white label on the laptop itself. [Will] it automatically activate and [will] I need to type in a [product key]? In case of Windows 8 or 8.1 laptops, you ...


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From your description, it sounds as if the Ubuntu installation medium is not booting in EFI mode. If this assessment is incorrect, please clarify. If I'm right, then there are a number of things you can try: Disable BIOS/CSM/legacy support in the firmware setup utility. Those options make it difficult to control the boot mode, as described in more detail ...


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Try using Boot-Repair, a tool which fixes this kind of problem. You just have to boot in Ubuntu and type the following in a terminal to install it: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Once the program is open, just click "Recommended repair" and cross your ...


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The Syslinux project contains a bootloader called memdisk, which can boot virtual hard disks. So if you put your MS-DOS installation on a hard disk instead, it would load the disk into memory and boot from it. You can also load multiple hard drive images to see multiple disks. However, the drives only work if your software uses the int13 to access disks, ...


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I had the same problem, probably caused by paragon software. The migration tools seems to have damaged or altered bootsector or bcd in efi. Using the steps described here: http://www.fixedbyvonnie.com/2013/12/how-to-repair-the-efi-bootloader-in-windows-8/ for correcting the two things, the installation works now. I hope this other people....


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This question has some good answers over at apple.stackexchange.com. cron is probably the easiest to set up; by using the special entry @reboot /path/to/script in the crontab file, your cronjob will only run at startup. There's an answer on how to do this in the question linked above. launchd is probably the right solution here. You can use it to run ...


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although launchd and the term LaunchDaemon sounds like daemons, it is the preferred way to automate beneath everything. apple says in his documentation, Login and logout scripts are a deprecated technology. In most cases, you should use launchd jobs instead, as described in Creating Launch Daemons and Agents login and logout scripts are scripts which ...


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I had the same problem and I like to share the solution that worked for me. First of all I have a Dell Inspiron Mini, Windows 7 Starter, No CD-Drive (is a Net Book). The Steps I followed were these: Connect a external DVD-Drive. In Bios Setup use the option to start from CD-DVD Use your System Recovery Disk(s), or run the System recovery from the ...


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After trying the other suggestion of Boot-Repair and GRUB editing, I ended up replacing the failing drive and installing a fresh, native (i.e. non-WUBI) Ubuntu. For the rare occasions that I need to do something in Windows, I fire up a VirtualBox Windows 7 installation.


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Short answer: No; you cannot make Hiren's Boot CD EFI compatible. Even when Hiren's uses Syslinux and it is true Syslinux 6.03 now supports UEFI (syslinux.efi) you will face at least 2 problems when upgrading your Hiren's CD to Syslinux 6.03: syslinux.efi is not an UEFI signed application then forget about the SecureBoot scenario. Syslinux.efi (as the ...


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It is possible. I have an option in my BIOS to either boot UEFI first or Legacy first. I have installed Ubuntu in UEFI mode from a USB live disk (first) and Windows 7 not in UEFI (MBR) from a DVD. This has resulted in 2 x 100mb partitions and I can switch OS's via the BIOS. I found this accidentally but it works. As neither OS realises it is in a dual boot ...


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I own a Samsung series 9 laptop (NP900X4C) with a Phoenix BIOS, Windows 8.1, and I had to boot to a USB device with Debian. First, I make my USB with a tool supporting UEFI (I use Rufus). Second, in BIOS (access by F2) I set Fast BIOS to Disable (enabling USB Legacy). Third, I reboot via Right Charms menu, Change PC Settings, Update and recovery, ...



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