Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

I want to install ubuntu on external SSD and use it as my primary OS and I want to keep my windows 8.1 on my primary HDD in computer for gaming and other stuff. Unplug your internal hard drive, plug the external ssd in, and install Ubuntu to it. In your UEFI change the boot order to boot from removable devices before hard drives. Now when the external ...


10

Reference Windows 7 Boot Error: ‘some file’ is compressed. Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart After switching on your computer or after restarting Windows 7 you receive the error ‘filename’ is compressed. Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart on a black screen with white writing when trying to boot into Windows. The ‘filename’ is different on different ...


5

Windows PE, Windows To Go, and Windows Embedded can be setup to boot from USB drives via a special pre-included driver. Other editions of Windows DO NOT support booting from usb. Long story short you cannot boot your copy of Windows, because it doesn't have the required driver, the driver it uses intentionally makes booting from USB not work. My suggestion ...


4

The first stage of the Windows bootloader cannot read compressed NTFS files. These files include BOOTMGR and NTLDR, which are used for the second stage of the Windows boot process. If they are in fact compressed, an error message like the following would be returned: [NTLDR|BOOTMGR] is compressed Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart Try booting from a Windows ...


3

This isn't possible in Windows. When you start your computer but before you're prompted for your password, Windows is loading background services and other "machine-level" programs. Then, when you log in to your user account (as opposed to another user account that might exist on the computer) Windows begins loading the "user-level" programs uniquely defined ...


3

You should already have an EFI System Partition if you have another OS installed, but if you need to make one you can boot up your Arch installation, and create an FAT32 partition using what-ever partition manager you like (I'd recommend Gparted), then add a "boot" flag to the partition so it's identified as an EFI System Partition. The partition can be ...


2

In the BIOS, set CSM to enabled. Now it works.


2

Reference Installing XP as a second OS Setting up the Dual-Boot Once Windows XP setup has finished, it’ll automatically boot you into the newly installed copy of Windows XP – note that you will not be able to boot into Vista/7 at this point, nor will you see a boot menu option for it. This is because Windows XP has installed its own ...


2

The article Mac Slow After Yosemite Update? Fix It offers the following solutions, one of which you might have carried-out without thinking of it as a solution, which could explain the improvement after 2 days : Free space on the disk if low Repair Disk Permissions Run Mac System Resets Turn Off Transparency Effects Lighten up the Notification Center ...


2

The idea to re-create the profile. And transfer files to a new working profile. Boot at Windows 7/8 CD/USB. Press Shift+F10 (run cmd) Run regedit 4.1. Select HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. 4.2. Load SOFTWARE hive. 4.3. Set name to load hive. Save and delete User registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows ...


2

You could use a bootloader that would let you load a USB drive - I've used plop before with an older system. You install the bootloader to your hard drive, use that to bootstrap an install off a USB drive. You can then replace that bootloader with grub, and chainload windows off that. The nice thing with plop is that you can boot USB drives even on entirely ...


2

If you have a valid Windows product key, you can legally download an official, untouched ISO. Here are some links: http://www.howtogeek.com/186775/how-to-download-windows-7-8-and-8.1-installation-media-legally/ http://www.techverse.net/download-windows-7-iso-x86-x64-microsofts-official-servers/ You'll need the key to activate Windows after the ...


2

Connect your hard disk to another computer as an external hard drive and open dive C or any drive that you had you document and just copy everything to the other computer and when you are than just re install windows but this time do it a clean installation. WAY to connect your hard disk as external. If you have an external hard drive. First open your hard ...


1

I did it in the following way: run 'fallocate -l xxsizeM xxx.img' then run 'fdisk xxx.img' partition as needed and don't forget to leavesome space at beginning and set a partition bootable flag using 'a' and partition number. Now issue 'losetup -f --show xxx.img' it will connect your file to a loop device /dev/loopY. Remember that Y number. Now issue 'kpartx ...


1

Found a guy that had a same problem, Writing zeros with dd and then reformating solved his problem. I thought that maybe there was a problem with the partition table that gparted was not able to detect. So I used fdisk to reformat everything. After that it worked flawlessly. Thank you everyone.


1

Go back into diskpart, and clean the disk. Then, continue on with the Windows installation. When it gets to the point of asking you what disk to install it to, choose the Unallocated Space, and let it create the partition scheme it needs. The typical Windows Vista/7/8 install requires more than just one giant NTFS volume, although that's what most people ...


1

If your BIOS supports different boot-devices, connect your SSD via eSATA and install the Ubuntu OS. Consult your manual how to select the boot-device at startup


1

Most likely your hard drive is failing in the sectors your windows partition is located. This explains being able to boot your linux OS. Copy files ASAP through linux and replace hard drive.


1

Faced a similar issue recently and this is what I did Disabled UEFI. Switched to Legacy During Windows 7 32 bit setup chose custom installation and deleted all existing partitions. Created a new partition from the unallocated space and windows setup allowed me to use that partition to install windows


1

I'm afraid you are expecting rather a lot from an OS if you think you can replace the motherboard and change CPU manufacturer and still expect the old OS to work without a hiccup! Whilst you might be able to run a recovery on it, I'm not sure how much I'd want to trust it. You might be better off trying an upgrade to Windows 8.1 on it.


1

Are your hard drives connected with IDE connection? Since you are using 8.1 that's very unlikely. If not ,you must be using SATA and SATA hard drives do not have this master - slave relationship. You can just install Windows on both HDD's and swap between by changing boot order from BIOS. So, all you answers would be: Yes.


1

First try using a different USB port since not all may work and check if BIOS indeed does not support booting from it. Another method is PXE boot from network but check BIOS support also. Other method is connect cdrom reader via usb if u have one. Lastly I did a google search and here is a method to install ubuntu from windows without additional media: ...


1

If you can remove the hard drive and mount it from a different computer, that's an easy way to do it. With modern compact laptops, accessing the internal hard drive is not always easy, but if you are lucky, there is a standard 2.5" drive behind two X screws that you can access from the side of the case, or sometimes the bottom. It's been a few years since ...


1

I spent an another whole day on this and finally I managed to install it The steps I took are the following I connected the drive to the PC and booted into an Ubuntu LiveCD session Formatted the drive to FAT32 with gparted Opened terminal and launched sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt && sudo grub-install --boot-directory=/mnt/boot /dev/sdb Downloaded ...


1

Get Process Explorer from Sysinternals. It can record process creation and exits during a reboot. Use Autoruns, also from Sysinternals, to see what's going on and easily disable individual items.


1

As the other poster stated, disable Opera from starting on boot, see if it still pops up (which means it's unrelated to Opera) or if not and you start Opera and it then pops up, you'll know what it's related to. Process Explorer from sysinternals can give you the IMAGE PATH and parent window of the window that flashes open. Also check out Process Monitor ...


1

Yes, but not trivially. Connect the the to your host using a caddy with eSATA. Then install virtualisation software. (e.g. virtual PC) Use the PC as a raw disk in the VM. Boot the VM and install windows. Run sysprep. Move the now installed disk to a PC with similar or identical hardware. All in all it might be much simpler if you tell use why you want to ...


1

It is possible to boot from a USB-device. It's quite normal and very handy for installing and trouble shooting, but I would NOT recommend that solution for a system drive. - External SATA is a much better solution. Even though USB seems just as fast (on paper), the buffering, "lack" of real-time and stability will slow it down. External SATA acts exactly ...


1

Seems to me like windows restored the correct MBR to the wrong device (i.e., your USB stick). I would go ahead an use a different tool to restore your MBR. There are a lot of bootable ISOs out there. For convenience I would recommend you take something like UNetbootin or YUMI and choose one (or more) of the recovery images they offer. I would suggest a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible