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4

Rule 1: Physical access is Root Access. Period. In general, if a luggage padlock is not sufficient, then you put it in a locked room. if that's insufficient, you add a retinal scanner. if that''s still not sufficient, guards with guns....


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What's probably happening is this: Your PC has a clever feature usually found on servers, but also in several desktops, in the setup, saying something to the tune of: "In case of power failure: [ ] do nothing [ ] stay off [X] last state". Your PC's power unit is slightly faulty - probably a capacitor is a bit cooked. When it feels a sudden "spike" in ...


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PenDrive Linux has several tools for that purpose. (Under Windows) YUMI - can put Linux Live CD onto USB drive, boot to Windows installation ISO, boot to different tools such as password reset, partition maintenance, and boot to ISO in general. Installer also offer download links to some of the tools. Universal USB Installer - make Linux Live CD and ...


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This is a "feature" of many BIOS implementations. Fortunately, the ATA security spec is only enforced by the BIOS, not the drive itself. That means if you can get around the BIOS, you can access the drive. Please note, a USB enclosure may not work. Issuing ATA commands to a SATA drive in a USB enclosure may fail. It depends on whether or not the USB ...


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You need to disable fastboot in Windows 10. You are not cold booting at the moment. If you cold boot, you will be able to use F2 as usual. Use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Power HiberbootEnabled DWORD 0 = Turn off fast startup 1 = Turn on fast startup and then boot again to access the BIOS.


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Try doing this... You will be able to boot onto the USB after running the Internet Recovery Tool. https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT201314 Boot into the Internet Recovery by holding command + R. Using the disk utility, click on the USB Device. After clicking the connected USB device, format it to Mac Extended Journaled Hard Drive. Click apply or ...


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Windows does not support boot from a USB disk. Instead of booting directly from the external disk, you could use VirtualBox to build a virtual machine that boots from the external USB disk. Here is one reference among the many that can be found : Using a Physical Hard Drive with a VirtualBox VM.


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I looked up your processor and it is actually a 64-bit processor. The thing with these smaller netbooks that have a intel baytrail is that they often have 64-bit processors but 32-bit UEFI firmware. Basically you need a 64-bit Linux distro with a 32-bit bootloader for it to work because as far as I know, 32-bit Ubuntu doesn't have an .EFI file and the 64-bit ...


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Booting from the Live Disc alone will not install it on your computer. Unless you want to install it to your computer you have the option to launch the installer on the live disc. You can Access your hard drive from the disc. But this will not overwrite your settings and data unless you choose to do so. So It safe to say no it wont change any data on ...


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The question is which sdX you should use but not which sdcY. If sda and sdb are "data drives", then it would be sdc. The device specified is where grub will put its boot code / core image on, which should usually be the MBR and the post-MBR gap between that and the first partition of the boot disk. The bigger concern is where the grub modules and so will be ...


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Solved same problem: no beep, no video. I removed the video card and conected the monitor to the motherboard. I also cleaned all fans and radiators. The operating system is Windows 98 SE, upgraded to unoficial SP3 and it is still working fine.


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Assuming your just asking what it is. Chainloading is when a boot loader loads another boot loader to begin the boot process. For example When using GRUB (short for GNU GRand Unified Bootloader), a boot loader package from the GNU Project with a Linux/Windows dual boot setup, with GRUB being installed on the Master Boot Record it must load the Windows ...


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Get your housing power checking. Sounds like there are electical problems within your walls causing power to not run as reliably as it should. Something else you can check is to load up the bios and check the power settings, I can't remember the exact name but there should be a feature along the lines of "Power on computer after power loss" set that to no ...


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Some computers have a setting in the BIOS where you can have the computer automatically turn itself on after a power failure. The first thing to do is check to see if your computer has that setting enabled. If your lamp is causing a power blip when you turn it off, and both are on the same circuit, that would explain why your computer turns itself on. The ...


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To fix the bootmanager you can boot from the MiniTool Partition Wizard. (Only 150MB). In the Partion Wizard you need to set the windows partition as bootable. Partition Wizard: http://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html To format the Harddrive from the installation disk you need to do this: Open the terminal/command prompt. diskpart ...


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okay, you cannot change the boot order from within windows because the boot order is in the BIOS. once you boot up an OS, you cannot boot another one at the same time, so you will need to boot your usb first. enter the BIOS and change the boot order that way. it depends on your computer, specifically your motherboard. look online to see how you access the ...


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how did that first bootstrap get made? Building (writing and cross-compiling) a bootstrap program is not as daunting as you seem to suggest. I should point out that I am talking about ARM devices really, I get the basics of loading via BIOS on a typical machine, but lets say we are talking about a custom device? The BIOS that you refer to is ...


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I know this thread is old now, but what I did to fix the issue was to create a UEFI boot usb drive with windows 10 (I assume 8 would work as well), and booted into the setup (the system still seems to boot into UEFI usb drives). In the repair section, you have the option to boot into the UEFI bios. That did (at least in my case) bring up the bios again, and ...


1

This is definitely a workaround but if you can, put the external HDD into your PC or laptop so that it becomes internal, and install Windows 8 on it. Then remove the HDD and make it external again. Reboot from the external drive. It boots just fine when I take a HDD with Windows 8 from a PC in my school and connect to my laptop. My drives are in NTFS ...


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Same situation. Rather than trying to force the upgrade after being stuck in the boot loop, I was OK with just going back to Yosemite and forgetting El Capitan ever existed. Surprisingly, this got me back to booting Yosemite: When presented with error message select Apple Menu -> Startup Disk ... -> Select HD -> Confirm Reboot Back to booting Yosemite like ...


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fairly simply - add it as a startup script - last line of script after checking all ok etc: rm $0


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It appears to be some combination of Windows screwing up the system and Dell's hardware being rubbish: http://www.c0le.org/2014/12/dual-booting-debian-jessie-and-windows.html Every time you boot Windows (I never do! It happened by accident!), it tries to add its own bootloader and that buggers everything up. What appears to fix it is to do this at a ...


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Windows 8 won't fit on a CD. You'll have to use a flash drive probably. I had a similar problem, and ended up downloading a VM from Microsoft. From there, I used Parallels to run the VM and downloaded an ISO - you can get one here - then used Rufus (I can only put two links in this post, so that's something you'll have to Google yourself) to create a ...


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When you do the rsync backup of the Linux boot device, make sure you leave out things like /tmp, so it doesn't create any confusion. Otherwise, I don't see a problem with doing this.


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Windows 10 (and older) will happily recognise existing disks with the MBR partitioning scheme. You can use a GPT disk to boot from and data disks, external drivers, pendrives and whatever else I forgot to mention with MBR's on them and they will just work.


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The only reason I can think of for this to happen (if I correctly understood the question) would be secure boot. Is Secure boot enabled in your BIOS? (If so, you have to disable it to be able to boot Windows 7). If this was not the problem, then there are I guess many details that vary from BIOS to BIOS that can cause issues like this. In which case I ...


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Ah, INACCESSIBLE BOOT DEVICE seems to be a windows 10 favourite... The first possible solution is outlined below, with an extra twist in case you need it. It seems to work for most people, but as your circumstances are slightly different we will have to see: At the blue screen where the error appears, click Advanced Options Click Troubleshoot Look for an ...


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I have no definitive solution, but I do have some observations: The page you reference was written in 2010 and last updated in 2013. Thus, it's rather stale and may be completely inapplicable to Ubuntu 16.04. The diskutil list output on the converted disk shows that it uses the Apple_partition_scheme -- That is, Apple's APM partition table format, not GPT. ...


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I wonder if there is anyway I can make this system boot. Easy. Turn on power. Done. The system should start, run its firmware (probably BIOS given the age of the system) and try to load the bootloader from whichever target is configured in the BIOS. Now, without graphics this is where it get tricky. Most BIOS implementations on consumer motherboards ...


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When you are at your login screen, try switching your USB devices to different ports. If your devices were disabled in Windows somehow, swapping them to a new port should cause them to be re-enabled. Windows generally disables USB devices based off what the device is, and what port it is plugged into. Plugging into a new port should allow you to regain use ...



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