Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

55

Both. CMOS stores BIOS configuration information. When you "enter setup", you are running the BIOS's configuration program, which loads the settings defined in CMOS. You are "setting up" the CMOS, by providing configuration information the BIOS will use as it runs. The BIOS is a program written as Firmware onto a ROM, so it cannot be written to (except by ...


12

My USB won't boot I am going to assume that this means an USB pen drive (and not a USB printer, USB scanner, USB network card....) This can have several reasons: The device is not bootable. The deivce is not bootable unless it was present early. The computer does not support booting from that type. The computer does not support booting from that ...


10

Your question is excellent and provides incredibly useful details, thanks! Here are my suggestions, in no particular order. A: What is that RollBack splash screen on startup? This could be a reason for slow startup times but personally even if it was absolute crap, I would still expect Win7 to load normally once "Rollback" was was finished. B: You have a ...


7

Definitely not the hard drive. It could be the screen or the graphics card, but it's more likely the graphics card given that the computer spontaneously rebooted. Easiest way to tell would be to hook up a different screen and see if you get the same results. If you do, then it's the video card. Your only option is to replace it.


6

It looks like you are missing the Intel Chipset drivers. That could absolutely slow your computer down. Go install all those drivers from Asus: http://www.asus.com/Notebooks_Ultrabooks/K56CB/HelpDesk_Download/ *Please verify your laptop model before installing drivers. Next, I would try removing Rollback rx pc. Test it without it installed. If that program ...


5

"I tried pressing F12 to select devices, but nothing happens." F12 does not seem to be the correct key ... Source BIOS Access Keys for Sony, Lenovo, Toshiba, Dell, Gateway, and More! Sony VAIO, PCG-Series, VGN-Series Press F1, F2 or F3 after turning on the computer.


4

It is probably because something is using your mechanical HDD. Non-SSD disks can realistically only support one, maybe "one and a half" simultaneous users. More than that and everything becomes dog slow. Having said that, it's a good idea to diagnose the disk as the bottleneck instead of just guessing. Here's a bit of a technical guide for how to do that. ...


3

There are two things I noticed: The little figurine sitting on top of the case may be causing sound from vibrations. With the PC sitting on the floor, it may need a good cleaning. It is possible fan has dirt stuck to the blades. This can cause the fan to spin off balance causing vibration and premature bearing failure. I know you said you cleaned it, ...


3

BIOS stands for Basic Input Output System and CMOS stands for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor. The BIOS system is written onto the CMOS microchip. You can't have a BIOS without a CMOS to hold it, so it's not uncommon for the two terms to be used interchangeably.


3

Your system has a UEFI firmware. Because of this, Windows requires you to format your hard drive as a GPT disk instead of an MBR disk (which you have). GPT disks do not have the concept of an "Active" partition the way MBR disks do. That's why the option is grayed out. In a BIOS world with MBR disks, the computer simply boots to whatever partition has the ...


3

You need to change your boot sequence. Some laptops require you to prioritise the boot sequence. Make it in this order: Removable devices Hard Drive CD-ROM If this option can be disabled then do it


2

This seems like malware, or at least ad-ware, possibly incompletely installed (since it doesn't go directly to the wrong site). Check the browsers (including IE) for add-ons. Malwarebytes and Kaspersky Security Scan are free antivirus scanners, and free Avast! also has a browser extension check. If you want to find the cause of startup, use free Autoruns ...


2

It appears to be either the screen itself or the connection to the computer. Do the artifacts appear over the built-in monitor menu? If so, it's the screen. Does reseating either end of the video cable help?


2

According to the picture your HDD will fails soon because you have some uncorrectable and some pending sectors. The BIOS seams to detect this during boot: "Test failed. Drive replacement recommended. Completion Code: 7" and skips the HDD, but still allows you to boot if you ignored a different boot drive like a DVD. Backup all data to a different ...


2

If it is still of interest: Try to start Linux with the linld.com command. It can handle big kernel images (>4 MB) and a big initrd (>10 MB). In my system, I use the following command: c:\loadlin\mandrake\linld image=C:\loadlin\mandrake\linuz263.889 initrd=c:\loadlin\mandrake\init-263.889 "cl=root=/dev/sdc14 ro video=1024x768" linld.com can be ...


2

Okay, now I feel like someone with brain activity of an amoeba. At some point the VGA cable had come off (I guess I will never figure out how) and that's the reason the screen was unresponsive. Thank you for your helpful answers and patience.


2

I've set rights to all data on mac HD for user 'system' to read-only. Also I do it for the groups 'wheel' and 'stuff'. Only one user account with name 'mac01' has all rights to data on my mac HD. If you messed up with OS X permissions, normally you should run Disk Utility in recovery mode and run Repair Disk Permissions and Repair Disk to correct errors ...


2

Use something like UNetbootin to automatically download and create a Ubuntu LiveUSB with persistence: This will quite likely kill your flash drive fairly quickly though depending on the amount of data written to it.


1

With Windows 7, I've never had a problem inserting a drive into another computer. Even from desktop to laptop and vice-versa has worked numerous times. I really want you to try installing a fresh copy of anything (preferably vista or 7) to check if there might be other hardware problems. If if fails to boot a fresh install on a clean disk, there are ...


1

Unplug the system, remove the battery, and then remove and reconnect the hard drive. If it's then still not seen, the drive has failed. Another option If your hard drive is not recognized, that may indicate that it has failed. My suggestion would be to try booting to your Dell drivers and utilities disc. Insert the disc, then tap the F12 key when ...


1

Your "automatic startup" issue may be a setting in your BIOS to automatically start the machine when AC power is restored - important for servers/machines that need to be on all the time. Regarding your "no display" problem: The Intel Xeon E3-1271 V3 does not have integrated graphics so you must install a graphics adapter into the machine. Source: ...


1

Not sure what you mean by "I have tried to find little secrets in the BIOS", but there are a couple things that can be causing you issues. First, the BIOS is not setup properly to boot to USB. Below is how to do that per Toshiba. Once in the BIOS locate the Boot tab and set the boot order to show the USB at the top as shown (Windows 7 shown, other ...


1

mounts should be defined in /etc/fstab instead. Other than that, /etc/rc.local should work unless what you entered there is invalid for some reason. You need to ensure that it exits with a status 0, in addition having its executable bit set. If I'm not mistaken, it should have a permission mask of 755. Based on your comment, it sounds like you're trying ...


1

Honestly, your best bet is to backup your files to USB or DVD storage and reinstall Windows, wiping all of your old files. I know it's painful process, but in the end you'll have a GUARANTEED virus free system. No other method of A/V scanning can claim same. You could also try Kaspersky Rescue CD - it's different since it doesn't work from your infected ...


1

The solution turned out to be simple: the installer had converted my internal drive into a corestorage volume, and after reverting it back to HFS I could boot from my internal drive again. diskutil corestorage revert /dev/disk1


1

Here's my professional opinion, especially since I've had a bit of experience with this model. The issue is likely hardware, I'd bet money on it. I've only experienced 3 things that cause incessant beeping like you mention. ~ Stuck Keyboard Key > Beeping comes from repetitive/too many key strokes. Usually this means stalling at startup but I wouldn't ...


1

initramfs is the state of loading the operating system into the RAM of the computer rather than continuing to read it from your removable media like USB or CD/DVD. It stands for "initial RAM file system", the linux Kernel mounts this area as the root file system and then launches the init process to start the rest of the fireworks.


1

Other option is to obtain a USB-to-SATA interface (Cheap enough on Ebay) and boot from a desktop CDROM drive connected to this and a 5v/12v psu. That will almost always work even if flash ram boot will not.


1

It's possible, but not certain, that you'll be able to boot the image you copied using my rEFInd boot manager. You can test this without installing anything to your hard disk by downloading the USB flash drive or CD-R image, preparing a boot medium with it, and booting it. If you're lucky, you'll see one or more entries for the Linux kernel(s) and/or the EFI ...


1

Windows 10 Technical Preview, as the name suggests, is not for production. I think it's your fault, that you can't access your files. What I have read, Windows 10 automatically locks if you don't update it, but I don't know how to do it, because I'm not using it. The only thing that comes to my mind is accesing the Windows 10 partition offline from Ubuntu ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible