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I know this post is pretty old by now, but hopefully this will save people a lot of trouble with this issue if anyone runs into it in the future. There's a much simpler way to solve this when Windows and Linux are installed on the same disc, rather than going through all the effort listed in the "Hard case" answer (at least, in my experience). Dual ...


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YUMI or SARDU http://www.pendrivelinux.com/tag/multiboot-usb/ I've used YUMI quite a bit. It is meant mostly as a multi live Linux USB creator. Works most of the time with installs if you need to.


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You can use Hiren's Boot CD. Hiren's Boot CD


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You can try creating a Linux Live USB in another computer, and then boot it in the damaged one. Use Linux to delete the whole damaged volume and reinstall Windows normally.


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Sounds like your disk is bad. You should be able to boot from pretty much any OS disk and format your drive. This happened to me, and it was a great excuse to tell my wife I had to spend some money to upgrade to an SSD :)


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What if you use the disable USB port program via Task Scheduler on user logoff and enable on user logon? Or use Microsoft' devcon command to disable/enable the specific device using Task Scheduler.


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If I clone this drive and then reinstall windows, will I be able to restore the HD using the clone without causing it to have the same problems? If you clone a drive, all you're doing is making an exact copy of the drive. Every single bit of data that was on the previous version will be on the next drive. So No, that won't work and WILL cause the same ...


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This sounds like either someone set up a "Power Up By RTC Alarm" in your computer's BIOS/UEFI or you have got a faulty power button in your case. I recommend doing the following: 1) Try resetting your BIOS/UEFI to Factory Defaults (or deactivate Power Up by XXX options) and see whether the problems persists. 2) In case the first approach did not fix this ...


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On Windows 7 and Windows 10 the Task Scheduler is the best "built-in" option I've found to do this. Procedure Press Start button and search for Task Scheduler and open it. On the right side of the screen, under Actions/Task Scheduler Library click "Create Task..." Under the "General" tab click the radio button next to "Run whether user is logged in or ...


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I had a similar problem when I tried to dual boot Windows 8.1 and Fedora. After I booted into Windows, the Grub boot menu disappeared until I changed my BIOS settings, then it would work until I booted Windows again. These two links helped me solve the problem: http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-refind-boot-loader-for-uefi-systems-a-life-and-sanity-saver/ ...



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