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85

Does every OS need RAM?For IBM PC compatible hardware, a mandatory step of the BIOS POST process is to check if there is RAM to load the BIOS into. Optionally the POST process checks of your RAM functions correctly. After the POST process, the BIOS loads the bootloader to the RAM and gives control to the bootloader. So the answer to your question ("Does ...


33

It's possible in theory, but it would be very slow, since it'd need to use the disk for any temporary storage that didn't fit in the CPU caches. (CPUs have a few megabytes of cache because even RAM is too slow for them. Think about that.) So you'd need a rather small OS. But, another thing is, the BIOS runs before and outside any installed operating system, ...


15

You could, with some effort, design a system that contained no RAM. Load your software from ROM (or storage) and do everything in registers or on cache. Such a system would have exceptionally narrow use and given today's RAM prices be a bit pointless. An off-the-shelf laptop will not function without some onboard memory. Your real question is more likely ...


15

As @Gaurav Joseph already wrote, the problem is caused by the BIOS battery. Some background: In order to access a disk you need the right drivers. In the past those drivers were loaded before you could start installing. Eventually the disk controllers and disks in most PC type computers standardised to something called IDE or ATA. Windows XP (and other ...


11

I finally found another post on another site with the exact problem and solution that fixed it for me. Apparently there's a separate brightness setting for the screen when it's plugged in vs when it's not. The issue was the 'plugged in' version of the brightness setting was all the way to the lowest (black). Safe mode must have worked because the boot ...


10

I want to install ubuntu on external SSD and use it as my primary OS and I want to keep my windows 8.1 on my primary HDD in computer for gaming and other stuff. Unplug your internal hard drive, plug the external ssd in, and install Ubuntu to it. In your UEFI change the boot order to boot from removable devices before hard drives. Now when the external ...


10

Reference Windows 7 Boot Error: ‘some file’ is compressed. Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart After switching on your computer or after restarting Windows 7 you receive the error ‘filename’ is compressed. Press CTRL+ALT+DEL to restart on a black screen with white writing when trying to boot into Windows. The ‘filename’ is different on different ...


10

This smells like the "Capacitor plague" You should look for swollen electrolytic capacitors. See this Wikipedia for an example view. If you are lucky you can change some of them and have a working board again for a few month. If not, buy a new one. This is most of the time cheaper than the labor you will need to figure out the exact defect.


10

Solved :) The cause seems to be a strange feature in the UEFI implementation, which can also be seen in the Open Source TianoCore implementation: https://github.com/tianocore/edk2/blob/master/IntelFrameworkModulePkg/Library/GenericBdsLib/BdsMisc.c#L1425 I ultimately found it after diffing my EFI variable dumps after the last 21MB "loss" and finding ...


9

If I read the question correctly everybody here is barking up the wrong tree. He states explicitly "in order to get to the BIOS". If the laptop is so broken it won't even get into BIOS, everything else is pointless. You can't boot ANY OS on this regardless of the RAM situation.


9

Something that comes close to what you're asking: Enable hibernation in power management and instead of shutting down your PC, use the hibernate option. This does turn off your PC's power and restores your PC to the state you were in when you turned the system off. Other than that, there's no built-in functionality that does what you are asking. The Windows ...


8

I do the opposite generally, that is my home system is a Windows 7 machine and I run various flavors of Linux as VM's. Being as Linux can function quite nicely with limited resources, this works for me even though I only have 4GB's of RAM (mind you this does mean I run a single VM at a time and typically give it 1024MB of RAM at the most to keep plenty for ...


8

Your assumption that the memory is bad is likely invalid. If you get no beeps or on-screen messages, The root cause is almost certainly a failed CPU (somewhat unlikely) or a failed mainboard (very likely). Mainboards fail with age all the time due to cold solder joints, which were a common occurrence in the early days of the ROHS movement and the requirement ...


8

Just now, I successfully created a bootable USB from a Windows 8.1 ISO containing a UDF filesystem. This will properly boot a UEFI machine into UEFI mode for subsequent install. It will not boot a BIOS machine or a UEFI machine in BIOS compatibility mode. Mount the ISO: sudo mount -t udf -o loop,ro,unhide /path/to/file.iso /mnt Insert the USB drive. Run ...


7

First, you don't set the mount point in GParted; that's done manually (and temporarily) via the mount command or permanently by editing /etc/fstab. Thus, your concern over this issue is misplaced. Second, an EFI System Partition (ESP) is simply a FAT partition with a particular type code (namely, C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B on GPT disks) set. Note ...


7

Bootsect.bak is a backup of the primary Bootsect.dos. It is created by default by old Windows operating systems when any boot modifications occur. It can be safely deleted, as it is only a back-up unlinked to the actual boot sector. Tip: Bootsect.dos is used to boot into the non-Windows NT operating systems. Bootsect.dos is created for example by Windows NT ...


6

If your USB drive is FAT formated, the maxmimum Size for a single file is limited to 4GB. If you need to copy bigger files you have to format it in NTFS.


6

To get the ASUS X55U to boot first from the DVD drive do the following: Press “ESC” or “F2” to enter the BIOS setup Under the “Boot” tab, enable “Launch CSM” Under the “Security” tab, disable “Secure Boot Control” Save the changes and exit Press “ESC” or “F2” to enter the BIOS setup again Under the “Boot” tab, the DVD drive and available flash drives will ...


6

Issue: AFTER successfully removing the 'RocketTab' malware (using a utility such as Malwarebytes Anti-malware), Windows starts up with a 'Command Prompt' (cmd.exe) appears and is shortly followed by an error message reading, "Windows cannot find c:\program files(x86)\rocket tab\client.exe". Resolution: Open the 'C:\windows\system32\tasks' directory. Locate ...


6

Others have covered the rest of your question, but I see they have left this part unaddressed: But if I boot into Linux, I can boot the Windows partition as a virtual machine. Is this possible? And/or: If I boot into Windows, I can boot the Linux partition as a virtual machine. Is this possible? The short answer is yes. The long answer is yes, but ...


6

No, your MBR is not working, but that's fine, because your Windows never used it in the first place. Your computer has the new UEFI firmware instead of BIOS, and it does not look for boot code in the MBR anymore – instead, it looks for the bootloader file in an "EFI system partition", and the firmware keeps a list of installed operating systems with ...


5

Or how abou this. You're interested in .net/C#, so why not just use Mono on linux? Its very cross platform in the sense java is.


5

Most of early computers of the 1980's or about had kind of operating system (hardware drivers, IO support, program loading, very simple command line interface, etc) in the ROM chip. It could somewhat function even while RAM chips were inoperable. This feature was used in special ROM content versions designed for running hardware tests and communicate mostly ...


5

The beeps are commonly referred to as beep codes. They provide an indication, usually about state of some hardware. A beep code is the audio signal given out by a computer to announce the result of a short diagnostic testing sequence the computer performs when first powering up (called the Power-On-Self-Test or POST ). The POST is a small program ...


5

You could go into the "Network and Sharing Center" and use the "Change adapter settings" option to disable the wireless adapter (right-click on the adapter and you should see "Disable" as the first option). If you don't want to disable the wireless adapter you can set the wireless service to start automatically, but with a delay. I don't have a laptop on ...


5

Windows PE, Windows To Go, and Windows Embedded can be setup to boot from USB drives via a special pre-included driver. Other editions of Windows DO NOT support booting from usb. Long story short you cannot boot your copy of Windows, because it doesn't have the required driver, the driver it uses intentionally makes booting from USB not work. My suggestion ...


5

The major advantages that UEFI provides are: 1. Better disk support: UEFI supports GPT (GUID Partitioned Table), which adds support for very large hard drives (e.g. those in excess of 2TB.). BIOS uses MBR, which had a size limitation of 2TB because of 32bit tables. UEFI has 64bit tables allowing the boot devices to be larger than 2TB. This has a lot of ...


5

The article Windows Update KB3033929 Update Loop contains the only two known solutions for this update loop. Before starting, I suggest taking an image backup of the entire disk and verifying that you have the proper boot CD or USB required to restore it in case of catastrophe. I would suggest in the future to always take such an image backup before doing ...


4

Each BIOS manufacturer uses a unique series of diagnostic beeps during the Power On Self Test to identify various hardware problems. On your computer, four beeps indicates a memory failure. Open the service cover on your laptop and make sure your memory is properly seated. Try removing and reinserting the memory modules. If you have compatible memory ...


4

The first stage of the Windows bootloader cannot read compressed NTFS files. These files include BOOTMGR and NTLDR, which are used for the second stage of the Windows boot process. If they are in fact compressed, an error message like the following would be returned: [NTLDR|BOOTMGR] is compressed Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart Try booting from a Windows ...



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