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Assuming this is Windows? Have you tried selecting the boot options during start-up and viewing the options are available to you? This is normally done by pressing the DEL or F12 key during start-up. You could also try seeing if safe mode is available to you by pressing F8 during start-up.


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Disk 2 contains your active partition. This is the partition that the computer needs to boot from. - Either put the disk back, or use a Windows (i am assuming you are using windows) installation disk to boot into 'Repair my computer'. One of the options will ask to fix your computer automatically - This works for most boot issues.


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If the LED light you speak of is the power indicator LED that is flashing then it is most likely saying you don't have enough power to start the laptop. Typically this light will stay solid (usually amber color) if the laptop is plugged up with the AC adapter but the battery is not fully charged. When the battery is fully charged this light may change (...


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According to the HDMI 1.3a spec there is a power pin that provides 5V/50mA, but it specifies that the power flows from the PC to the display. However, MHL is a standard for connecting smartphones and mobile-tablets to displays, and while I couldn't find the spec, according to the wikipedia article it allows power to flow from the display to the device, ...


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When you open the ETL in WPA, click on Profiles->Apply->Browse Catalog and select the file FullBoot.Boot.wpaprofile you see this overview: and see a 58s delay in PreSessionInit/PreSMSS-Phase What Happens in This Subphase The PreSMSS subphase begins when the kernel is invoked. During this subphase, the kernel initializes data structures and ...


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Try CBBurnerXP. It has an option to burn ISO files. If that doesn't work, try Universal USB Installer, YUMI Multiboot usb or LinuxLive USB Creator. Live linux will work faster when booted via USB than from CD.


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Your target is not found because you are trying to update a device that does not exist. Your laptop only has 1 optical drive, therefor trying to run a firmware update for another optical drive will not work. See comments.


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As someone suggested (unfortunately the post is gone and I don't recall the username), the solution was switching my PSU. After trying a different PSU of the same model the issue has disappeared. So the answer was a faulty PSU! Not sure why the answer-post has disappeared but I'd like to thank whoever you are a ton!


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There is a free software I use a lot which is EasyBCD. It allows you to completely customize Windows bootloader. What I suggest is: Use it to set your bootloader to Windows bootloader (using the "Write MBR" function, in "BCD Deployment") Upgrade to Windows 10 Use EasyBCD again to set up a dual boot between Windows and Ubuntu I have used this software on ...


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I agree with you completely I was in the same position a couple weeks ago. It is the dual boot, what I did was physically unplug the sata power and data cables (just to be safe) from the disk containing Grub and in my case a copy of Centos 7, then I allowed Windows 10 to install itself and then after wards plugged the disk back in and everything worked like ...


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Uninstall nvidia-current (sudo apt-get remove nvidia-current) and use only the default open source graphics drivers. Increase VirtualBox video RAM to the maximum amount of 256MB. From the Windows command line run: cd "C:\Program Files\Oracle\Virtualbox" vboxmanage modifyvm "Name of virtual machine" --vram 256 If you run VirtualBox and go to Display in ...


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You could recreate the boot partition and reinstall GRUB using the Ubuntu 16.04 live CD. If the boot partition is still there but simply formatted, you can skip step 4. Boot on a liveCD or liveUSB Boot your computer either on: a Linux-Secure-Remix liveCD or liveUSB, then choose "Try Ubuntu", then go directly to Step 3 below. or a Ubuntu live-CD or live-...


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I avoid using the Windows boot manager by having a dual boot installation with Lubuntu. It goes as fast as it takes Windows to shut down. I got there following the steps from help.ubuntu.com to install from an UEFI-only disk, after buying the computer with Windows pre-installed. It will only help if you want a permanent installation on hard drive, though; i....


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Yes, it is possible, but not using standard grub. Please check whether the "BIOS BITS" project's bootloader would work. It can update the microcode and then chain-load the operating system, but it is a very, very advanced tool. http://www.biosbits.org/


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Steps for copying and doing a fixup on an iso image: Make a temporary directory for the contents of your iso: # mkdir /var/tmp/isodir Make a temporary mount dir for the iso: # mkdir /id Mount the iso: # mount -oro,loop /path/to/file.iso /id Copy the contents to the new path: # cd /id # cp -av . /var/tmp/isodir Go over into /var/tmp/isodir and do ...


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To be bootable a disk has to have a valid boot sector. When you copy the contents, (...), and you make a new disk without the correct boot sector you have a normal disk full with the data. Check here about how to do a bootable iso image. (Look for -b option of genisoimage). Look here for a Minimal guide.


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Ok, so I found out that the computer had a virus and destroyed most of the data therefore not worth backing up. I reinstalled the OS and it should work.


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This issue arises when Windows is updated. So, after the update, it doesn’t boot to Windows and displays this blue screen of death along with error. There are two files that are the major cause of this error to appear. These files are listed below:- winlogon.exe: As the name of the file represents, this file is responsible for the login and logout ...


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So turns out the SSD was faulty, I borrowed another SSD and installed to that with no problems at all, same capacity just a Crucial instead of Kingston. The Kingston has been returned and refunded and I kept the Crucial instead. I wish I knew a way to have checked this during installation but I'm guessing it's something to do with the firmware on the unit ...


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As Long as hardware is Okay, Software problems can be solved. There can be different reasons why it is happening with your system. But for Answer, I suggest, have you tried clean format to your hard disk. If no, then give it a try. And then Try to update Boot driver after fresh installation of OS. If its latest then try to reinstall it. You can easily find ...


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If you were using the Windows 8, 8.1, 10 then you can disable it easily by opening the "Task Manager->Startup"There you can select the application and disable it.If you found this as an answer make it in comment.


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Gentoo on my home server boots from a single-drive Btrfs which I created like this (though the custom options should be irrelevant and the complete installation obviously required a lot more steps in between these relevant lines): mkfs.btrfs -f -s 4k -n 4k -O extref,skinny-metadata,no-holes /dev/sda grub-install /dev/sda grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg ...


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The problem is in your graphic card driver ("nouveau"). Possibly the browser want to use some acceleration, which are incorrectly coded in nouveau driver for your card. Try to check if there is a new driver, or eventually disable some acceleration (until there will be a new driver).


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Finally I've found not an ideal solution but an appropriate one. The problem was solved when I converted the second HDD partition table from MBR to GPT (the SDD was GPT initially). It looks like that UEFI prefers MBR over GPT besides settings. Maybe converting SDD's from GPT to MBR would works too. P.S. I've spend hours trying almost everything I've found ...


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Sounds like the drive may be damaged. SSDs are harder in my experience to repair and recover than HDDs. My suggestion is to get an external harddrive and an ubuntu live CD. Boot from the live CD, save off everything important you can get access to from the SSD to the external, and RMA the drive.


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It was solved by changing the hardcoded "hd0" for the FOG server grub loader to "hd1". You can find this in the /var/www/fog/lib/fog/BootMenu.class.php Search for the line that sets the BootExit style.


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Pulling the cord is one way to shut down. If this is similar to pressing the power button for 10 seconds - no idea. The difference with a normal shutdown is that the OS makes a note that shutdown was normal. When starting up, it looks for this, then sees it was not a normal shutdown, and then starts to do some tests, like a disk check. That takes more time....


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What I believe happens is that pressing the reset button, causes the chipset on the motherboard to change the state of the reset pin on the CPU. In this pdf for example: http://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/datasheets/4th-gen-core-family-desktop-vol-1-datasheet.pdf you can find information on "Reset and Miscellaneous Signals" on page ...


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So as I understand it, you did the same procedure as you did with Debian and Elementary, but with Kali it didn't work? In that case, I'd imagine it's because of the way you've copied the ISO to your USB drive, you might have to do it differently for Kali. I'd try gnome-disks if I were you, it's always worked for me.


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Just have been there too (where you are right now) And if you tablet is a Toshiba 10"... we are brothers in arms... ;-) Just add this entry to your GRUB2 menu menuentry "Windows 7" { insmod part_msdos insmod ntldr insmod ntfs ntldr (hd0,msdos1)/bootmgr }


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Thanks to guest I was able to access the boot menu in BIOS. Here's how. The point is that you have to just restart your laptop in a way which activates the function keys in the Welcome Screen. This is one of the possible ways. So to boot from a USB drive on Lenovo X230i with Windows 10 installed I had to: Go to Settings > Update & security > Recovery....


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Graphical illustrations for: Windows 8 Windows 10 Here's how you can access BIOS: Settings > Update & recovery/Update & security > Recovery > Advanced startup: Restart now > Troubleshoot > Advanced options. If you see UEFI Firmware Settings then go for it. Otherwise: Startup Settings > Restart > Tap the BIOS key (F1 in this case)


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You must be in CSM to boot into a linux kernal as of now, so just backup important stuff on windows 8, then reinstall windows 8 in CSM mode. Then reinstall linux in CSM mode, and then you successfully got a dual booting machine. Edit: To be properly in CSM mode, enable Legacy Boot and disable Secure Boot.


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From 15 Windows 10 problems - and how to fix them : Like Windows 8 before it, Windows 10 uses a hybrid boot to enable fast boot times. When you shut the system down, apps and app processes are terminated, but the Windows kernel itself is hibernated to allow for a faster restart. In theory, it's great, but it seems to still be very slow for some ...


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Finally fixed!!! Solution: I just removed the battery and kept down the power button about 20 seconds, that was enough to get back BIOS setup access. Then, just waited for grub, selected Ubuntu's advantage options and the first available option with "(recovery mode)". Turned off again and could start normally. This solution was reached with ...


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Copying the Windows ISO or its contents to the USB doesn't make it bootable. To do this, you will need the help of some software like Rufus or Microsoft Media Creation Tool. Create a new NTFS partition which the Windows 10 ISO needs to boot successfully. Boot from an Ubuntu live USB or live DVD and create a NTFS partition for Windows 10 using GParted from ...


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I was having the same trouble as you, until I found this blog post: Configuring rEFInd boot manager as your startup disk on a Mac The author, DavidJB.com, describes how you can set the default startup disk by pressing the control key at the same time as selecting the startup disk from the Startup Manager. (You need to hold down the option key during the ...


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I think you are missing the boot files on the SSD, use something like: bcdboot C:\windows /s D: /f all /l en-US where C:\windows = a valid Windows Installation to take files from /s D: = The drive letter of the partition which you want to use as the boot disk /f all = installs boot files for both BIOS and UEFI, just in case. /l en-GB = the language of ...


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You have a hardware problem, probably video RAM. Try a different, known-good video adapter. If you can't (because it's built into the laptop), then you're now in the market for trying to find a compatible motherboard from eBay or alike, or just replacing the laptop.


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Any information about dual-booting Windows Vista and newer Windows OSes still apply for Windows 10. Of course you can use multiple Windows 10s, 8s or 7s in the same boot store. The name entries in the boot are generated during Windows setup, I always rename mine after setup, but I'm sure the Windows setup program is smart enough to not use two entries with ...


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A really nice way to manage multiboot linux configurations is to use the excellent "YUMI" at http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/. Although it doesn't store the ISOs directly it formats up your USB stick and places a boot manager with nice menu system on the stick. Each ISO is expanded into the FS tree and the menu is updated to include ...


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Okay it's not about mint, it's about my toshiba laptop BIOS setting. Following some advice by google search result, I did the following setup in the BIOS and get it boot up: Disable boot security Change boot mode from UEFI to CSM Enable USB Legacy Emulation


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I ended up isolating the problem to a faulty SSD and it is now being sent for repairs. I will leave this answer here in case others run into the same problem.


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Its possible the fan is not properly secured with cooling paste. Basically the system turns on but no video, as the system protects from overheating. I solved this problem once by simply removing and reseating the cooler.


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Is there a solution to this problem, I have tried holding down the power button multiple times in the middle of booting, but I get the same screen with no start-up settings. I can't get into safe mode because I can't load into windows either.


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PXE boot into whatever you want, do whatever you want (fix the partition, erase it, reinstall etc.), all of that with Serva. (I'm related to Serva development)


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After reading a little bit on the internet I found this page, http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_8-update/windows-8-pro-cannot-boot-error-0xc000021a/ebf26ca7-e594-4c56-bbe0-cca43dfe5978 Where a guy says i had this problem and i fixed it. i faced this after updating my win8 and rebooting after that update. i tried safe mode but ...


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Try to memtest each 4GB module independently. Update the BIOS. Check (on lenovo site) if the module models you have are compatible with the T510. DDR3-L may be incompatible (has different voltage than standard DDR3 module).


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If you want to run Windows on Linux, you could try creating a virtual Windows machine running in VMware Player. Also if you want to run specific windows programs/executables, have a look into wine.


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If you're on Linux Mint, use USB Image Writer. It is pre-installed in Mint 17.x and on some earlier editions as well. Could be run from terminal too: mintstick -m iso. I successfully booted Mint 18 Beta both in UEFI and BIOS modes from a flash drive.



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