Hot answers tagged

7

You've already done what this SuperUser questioner is intending to do, and are hitting the problem that xe is worrying about. The answer is the same. You've got a combined boot+system volume. This is a poor idea, and something that even the x86 PC world has finally moved away from in the years since Windows XP was released. Windows 7 when installed on an ...


7

I fixed it by: Back up the partition to an external drive (using GParted). Delete the partition. Reinstall Windows 7 on the (now empty) drive. Copy the contents of the partition over the fresh install of Windows (using System Rescue CD). Windows now boots correctly and looks exactly the same as before.


5

I guess that you had Vista on the disk as partition 1 and then Windows 7 as partition 2, then deleted Vista, meaning that Windows 7 is now on partition 1. Unfortunately, Windows identifies its partitions by their numbers, so that all partition references in the Windows 7 registry are now incorrect and unusable. I believe that you will have to reinstall ...


4

Please make sure that the Windows 7 Recovery partition is set as the active!! I was having trouble because the active partition was set to C:\


4

After a long and eventually successful journey, I have been able to achieve it all. I have created a tutorial on how to perform this. Check it out. Per request, I am also posting the whole thing below: Software: First of all: you need a PC with Windows 7/8 and administrative access to it (Vista may work, not sure). This is where the tutorial will be ...


4

First, you wrote: I do not have enough portable storage for backup FIX THIS PROBLEM IMMEDIATELY!!!!! I frequently see problems on this and other sites caused by people who have inadequate backups. Because of accidents or hardware failures, they lose all their personal data. That out of the way, your computer uses EFI firmware, not BIOS. One of your ...


3

Try inserting the Windows 7 setup disk and selecting "Repair this system." I've run into many systems where the boot info was never installed to the new HD and the uses had unknowingly had been booting off the old HD, which then directs BIOS to the new HD for the bootup process.


3

Check your BIOS to change Boot order.


3

As a follow up to the comments I posted, you should keep your system in AHCI mode for better performance. When troubleshooting issues like this, and to maintain the best possible system performance, you should disable all unnecessary integrated hardware on your motherboard. For example, if you have more then one SATA controller on your motherboard, but are ...


3

bootmgr is not aware of "drive letters", that's something Windows does late in the boot process (and is configured in the registry, absolutely nothing to do with the physical disk configuration). Using Linux to clone a system is not supported by Microsoft. In short, the official answer is Don't Do That. You should use Windows PE. DISM can create and apply ...


2

bcdboot c:\windows /l it-it did the trick.


2

You will likely want to try Super Grub. You can boot from it the same way you would install ubuntu. If you have no external capabilities, you will likely have difficulty fixing this issue.


2

Here is a tutorial how to fix it. Try it hopefully you will get what you want. UPDATE AS Comment says 1: Insert your bootable media whatever you have like Windows 7 DVD or USB. 2: Boot from the bootable disc or USB. 3: Instead of click on Install Now select the option given bellow on dialog box Repair. 4: Select the Startup Repair option. 5: Now ...


2

I tried a program called EasyBCD. There's an option in there for change boot disk, which sets up everything that is required on the second disk. Now I can select the boot disk from the BIOS and boot that disk, which means I'm free to remove other disks without loosing my operating system. The guy who wrote that should be paid big $$ by microsoft for picking ...


2

$RECYCLE.BIN - Should be present on every drive. If you're feeling cowboy, you can right-click Recycle Bin on Desktop, go to Properties and set each drive to Don't move files to the Recycle Bin. Remove files immediately when deleted. .Trash-999 - If you can't delete it because of permissions, right-click -> Properties -> Security tab -> Advanced -&...


2

You should be able to use the Windows 7 DVD okay. Windows 7 and Vista both use the same bootloader so there should be no problem. Using the Windows XP CD would install and older bootloader which will not be able to boot Windows Vista, so that won't work.


2

EFI implementations must provide some way to control the boot mode (EFI vs. BIOS), except of course for EFI-only implementations without BIOS support. Too often, though, the firmware gives the user little or no explicit control of the matter; instead, the firmware attempts to infer the correct boot mode based on the state of the hard disk -- for instance, it ...


2

Install EasyBCD in Vista and add EasyLDR entries for the other OSes: All you need to do is uncheck the checkbox labeled "Automatically detect the correct drive". Subsequently, a drop-down box containing a list of all mounted partitions will appear, and you can choose the Windows XP installation you wish to boot into. Clicking "Add Entry" will cause ...


1

It is better to install Ubuntu after Windows. Why you are keeping your Hard Drive as ext4? It is better if you can keep the area to be used for Windows installation either non-formatted or as NTFS as you boot drive is.


1

I've just bought a Dell XPS 17 (l702x) and I'm interested in multi-booting a variety of OSes. If what I've understood is correct, the Dell has some form of locked-down Phoenix SecureCore Tiano UEFI 'BIOS'. From what I've read, UEFI isn't directly usable (possibly via a hidden menu etc., which might require a BIOS mod). It does seem possible to use/access a ...


1

From your ubuntu installation you can try using testdisk (you can apt-get install testdisk) It was primarily designed to help recover lost data storage partitions and/or make non-booting disks bootable again when these symptoms are caused by faulty software, certain types of viruses or human error (such as accidentally erasing a partition table). Recovery ...


1

Generally in the BCD (Vista/Windows7/Longhorn Boot loader) you only need one entry in total, for all ntldr based OS you'd like to boot. When the BCD transfers control to NTLDR, NTLDR uses boot.ini to provide a list, this list can and should contain all the NT-based OS you'd like to boot. E.g. multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS="Windows XP" ...


1

Every drive (and user profile for that matter) has its own recycling bin, so yes that is what that is Not sure what permissions error you are getting when trying to delete this file, but is should be possible to do under windows. The config.MSI folder is used to temporerally hold files while they are being installed. If the installation fails, the files are ...


1

Had the same issue and the below fixed it for me, assuming that you already know and started the rescue disk in Command Promt, I used the tool bcdboot.exe to recreate BCD: bcdboot c:\Windows /l en-gb /s x: Where x is the drive that has the System label.


1

I want to improve the solution parsley72 gave: Instead of copying the partition, install windows, then copy back: You can boot to CD (either System Rescue Disk or windows set up disk) - I use the SRD to fix mine - then, select the Fix your windows option. It does the magic! I think the reason is that you already have everything on C: (the restored OS, the ...


1

Try the fixes listed here: bootmgr is missing fixes There are a whole number of various fixes. Solution #2 worked for me. Hope this helps others.


1

Windows boot loader identifies partitions by offset in sectors + 4-byte disk signature in MBR. So when you moved your system partition with GParted, two odd things happened: 1) Disk offset of Win7 system partition changed, all references stored in BCD and SYSTEM registry hives are now broken. 2) Win7 system partition now has the same ID as WinVista system ...


1

It's worth resizing the partition once the image is deployed and increasing it... It may well be that Windows virtual memory needs more free space than that (did you change the setting in 'System Properties/Advanced system settings/Performance/Advanced' before you downsized?)


1

For your sake, I hope that the backup was not damaged. It is always a good idea to take two backups, just in case, and to verify them. Clonezilla has a checksum option, other products have real verification against the disk. You say nothing about the partitioning of the disk and whether you had multi-boot or a boot manager other than that of Windows 7 (such ...


1

I've had a ton of success with SuperGrub2, Even more then with Window's startup repair. I'd give that guy a try. Despite its name it can fix a Windows MBR without installing Grub.



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