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A BSOD cannot cause a bad sector. There is nothing that can be done at the interface of a properly-working disk drive that can cause a bad sector. There are no commands that will tell a drive to write anything but proper data; the commands the hard drive accepts are too high-level for anything else. You likely have a failing hard drive. You had one bad ...


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The typical traditional terminology for a "bad sector" is a portion of a hard drive that is physically failing to work right. It's just plain broken. That is why you're getting some people reporting that a BSOD shouldn't cause this. A BSOD may cause invalid data to be written; some advanced RAID cards have been known to be battery powered so that they can ...


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The extended test hangs at 21% of the first pass every time. This seems to be a problem other people have come across over time, but there isn't a satisfactory answer on the whole internet that I can find. I think the standard answer is replace the RAM in Slot 1 or Bank 1 (using 1-based math, and assuming 21% puts it in the first slot or pair of banks). ...


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My problems stared with a 0x50 stop error and then escalated from that. Simple fix was to clean the heat sink (dust build up) causing it to overheat. Also, my ram was diagnosted as good but one of my ram drive slots was bad (older computer). Mind you it was for XP but I upgraded to Win7 Ultimate via iso. Runs great now. It took me 3 weeks to find the ...


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I just had the same symptoms on my Dell M4700 Laptop. Unfortunately, removing all USB devices and starting over did NOT solve the problem for me. What did work was booting into the BIOS and clicking the 'Reset to Factory Defaults' button (GUI BIOS). Once the factory default settings were applied, Windows 7 x64 installed without any Blue Screens. It took me ...


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Some thing very similar happened to me. This was my process: Create a bootable memory tester. Do this with both sticks of RAM in first. If that returns errors. Run it on each stick individually in different slots in your motherboard. Do your best to pinpoint the problem. If nothing shows up, move on. I was upset when I had to do this also, but play games ...


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Your BSOD issues happen because the RAM timings are wrong. Your RAM runs at 767MHz and uses the timings for 666MHz instead of the ones which it should use. It should use the 800 timings which are 10-10-10-27-36. So, go into the BIOS and change the RAM timings and also set the command rate to 2 instead of 1, this also causes a lot of issues.



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