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First of all, like in your case, the filename of the driver may give away what device the driver is for. Without using any third party tools, the next step would be to look in the registry, all drivers are listed there. You can use regedit.exe or PowerShell: Get-ChildItem HKLM:\system\currentcontrolset\services | ForEach-Object {if ($_.GetValue("ImagePath"...


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Easiest way would be to test the CPU in another known-good system. If it passes, then the issue is likely your motherboard. Be sure to check other candidates if you haven't yet. Swap power supplies if you can, and also look for leaking or damaged capacitors on the motherboard. Poor power makes your computer unhappy.


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This is most likely a hardware error - and, unfortunately, it could very well be RAM. Download a Stress Testing Boot image and do a burn-in test - One such package is "stresslinux" (I've not used this particular variant though).


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Analyzing the dump with Windbg, shows that the driver firedrv.sys (firewire driver) cause the crash: DPC_WATCHDOG_VIOLATION (133) The DPC watchdog detected a prolonged run time at an IRQL of DISPATCH_LEVEL or above. Arguments: Arg1: 0000000000000000, A single DPC or ISR exceeded its time allotment. The offending component can usually be identified with ...


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If your computer blue screens than windows has already started. Not succesfully, but you are already starting it when it fails. This can have two reasons: A problem with the windows installation, or A hardware problem. If it is a problem with the windows installation then you can boot from other media. I am guessing that you already tried this since you ...


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I replaced the PSU last week but it didn't solve my problem. I have found the problem. My RAID0 was giving problems. This was the message I got in my logs: Reset to device, \Device\RaidPort0, was issued. I checked the system logs again and noticed this Windows 10 is having some weird power saving features that will try to spin down your raid0 disks. ...


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According to the Microsoft KB page this errors means a faulty driver: This error occurs when the Windows 10 upgrade fails after the second system restart. They’re likely caused by faulty drivers or software. The following drivers and software are known to cause these errors: SteelSeries mouse and keyboard software. The SteelSeries Engine is ...


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Here is the registry path for that: Registry Key Name: HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\ Value Name: PagingFiles Type: REG_MULT_SZ Data: C:\pagefile.sys 150 500 Hive Location Windows\system32\config\system Dump setting HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\CrashControl CrashDumpEnabled ...


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This post on Microsoft may help! -> Click Me!


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Okay. I believe that it is safe for me to consider this question resolved. This seemed to have been all due to my computer overheating, since once I took it out of its confined space the BSODs stopped.


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Edit As the person who commented on me has pointed out, this is probably a drive issue. I stand by using the sfc.exe command to find out the OS files running that could be causing the crash. It could be a driver trying to overwrite into memory that is should not. Fixing that could be as simple as just rotating your ram sticks. If rotating ram doesn't ...


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Yes, it's recorded in the Event Log. I quote the bsod tag wiki: If you didn't catch the BSOD display, information about the crash can be found in in System event log (viewable in the Event Viewer, eventvwr.msc). Error events from the BugCheck source contain the bugcheck code, the parameters, and the path to the dump file on the General tab. Critical ...


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"MACHINE_CHECK_EXCEPTION" is likely always a hardware problem. And it should have more detail than that (like it would mention which cpu and memory bank if it blamed RAM or cpu). You ran memtest, so it's probably CPU or something else. To test CPU, you can use prime95. Testing it in your already rapidly dying OS would be pointless though... maybe a livecd ...


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Had the same problem here. Solution was much simpler. Before installing/reinstalling windows, format both the target partition and the 100 MB partition created by previous installation. Worked for me.


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Here is what worked for me, strangely enough, and after hours and hours struggling to recreate UEFI boot structure. Symptoms: I was getting INACCESSIBLE BOOT DEVICE, as well as 0xc000000e errors, and sometimes also 0xc0000001 errors ("after multiple tries the OS on your PC failed to start ..."). Solution: If you can get to the Windows recovery screen, ...


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Yes you should. I'd actually suggest avoiding using the disk further except to back up. Modern disks are really good at handling small amounts of damage - reallocated sectors tend to mean "a sector was bad but we've managed to get the data elsewhere" That said "it depends", A 320gb disk is usually older, and well, you're hitting the point where preventive ...


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Copied (in part) from That Brazilian Guy's answer here, with permission The command line interface for the DiskCryptor Open source partition encryption software includes a -bsod parameter, the wiki says it will Erase all keys in memory and generate BSOD


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Seems it wasn't an error with my drives or Windows install. A motherboard replacement fixed the issue. Sorry to anyone else who may have had the same or similar issues.


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Windows uses a new Boot since Windows 8 called Fast Startup, which is a logoff + hibernation to shutdown and a resume from hiberation + login at boot. Here all drivers must support the hibernation/resume. you have an incompatible driver which causes the DRIVER_POWER_FAILURE. Here is the Windbg output: 0: kd> !podev ffffe0012a433060 Device object ...



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