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115

When retracting a RJ45 plug through narrow tubing or around corners, the clip tends to snap off, effectively making the network cable useless in most environments. The rubber dome (most commonly referred to as a cable boot) nearly always prevents that from happening. You wouldn't know how many network cables I've seen with broken off clips.


113

From experience, those retention clips break off a lot on the first sort of cables - those are fine for cables that are well protected and/or going to be plugged in and forgotten, but the moment those clips bend the wrong way, they break, and you end up with a cable that dosen't clip in place. They also snag each other sometimes and are just a PITA. Cable ...


89

If you don't want to replace the cable or install a new jack, you have a few of options: Glue it into a coupler or a short extension like one of the following (with the coupler you will need another short run of cable on the other side): Repair it with a zip tie. Use this guide for instructions: ...


43

The short answer: Not really The long answer There are a couple main differences between $4 HDMI cables and the more expensive ones. Connectors More expensive cables usually have more heavy-duty connectors. This is obviously important as you want to be able to reuse the cable once you buy it. Some cheap HDMI cables will break after plugging/unplugging a ...


40

Take a look here for a very good explanation: http://computer.howstuffworks.com/question352. They're ferrite beads used as an anti-EMI and anti-RFI measure (chokes): Another source of noise is the cables connecting the devices. These cables act as nice, long antennae for the signals they carry. They broadcast the signals quite efficiently. The signals ...


40

It's not the length (100 meters -approximately 330 feet- is the max for ethernet UTP), but most likely the quality of the cable is bad. Maybe the cable is damaged internally or at some point was pinched severely. This is not always visible from the outside. Could also be that one or both ot the RJ45 connectors is crimped on badly or is incorrectly wired. ...


38

Typical 802.11g Wireless has a theoretical maximum of 54Mbps. Typical wired 10/100 Ethernet has a theoretical maximum of 100 Mbps. So in theory wired is faster. However, these speeds are only on your local network. Most high-speed internet connections range from 1Mbps to 25 Mbps. Even on faster internet connections you're only approaching 1/2 of the ...


28

The only benefit to HDMI is that you don't need a second cable for audio. HDMI essentially combines a DVI connection with audio. Actually, because of this, you can acutally get converters that go from HDMI to DVI for a few bucks. Because it already has a DVI connection in it, the quality over the HDMI connection would be identical. The only reason you'd ...


27

That's an anti-snag boot meant to protect the clip when pulling the cable through other cabling, conduit, and other tight spaces. You can carefully clip it off if you don't care about the anti-snag capability. There are some other anti-snag styles that can work better in tight locations: I've found that first style works well in our 48 port ethernet ...


24

The black connection provides power and data. The red one is power only. The second cord should be used if the black one doesn't provide enough power to power and/or charge the device. You'll see a lot of external hard drives come with the same type of plug (though usually both are black). EDIT: To answer your second question, plug the device in using ...


22

5 meters is the maximum USB cable. You can get further by connecting USB hubs serially (maximum of 5 hubs chained this way). You can't just use USB extension cables due to timing issues. From the USB FAQ: Q1: How long of a cable can I use to connect my device? A1: In practice, the USB specification limits the length of a cable between full ...


21

Yes. This article answers most of your questions. Is there special outdoor-rated cat5e/cat6 I should use? "Preferably, special exterior or direct burial CAT5 cables should be used for outdoor runs instead of ordinary CAT5." If put it in a dug trench, do I need to put it in conduit? "Exterior-grade Ethernet cables are waterproof and thus do not ...


20

In theory, yes, it might be possible for a display to exploit a weakness in the computer's display drivers via the DDC backlink. In parctice, I have never heard about such an exploit being used.


16

No, they cannot be spread via VGA.


16

It's entirely possible to cut off the plug and install a new one, but you will need a crimping tool. It's about $15. The thing is, your local store will probably charge you more than $15 for a cable - even if you buy it online, it'll probably be close to that when you take shipping into account. Therefore, it's cost-effective in my opinion, even if you only ...


15

I would guess that it is most likely an F Connector: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F_connector Yes Canadian Tire would most likely carry an F Connector. If not you can easily purchase these connectors (or already crimped cables) online (just search google for it).


15

As others have pointed out this is a ferrite core used to reduce the electromagnetic interference produced by the cable. The European Union updated the EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) directive in 2004: The purpose of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is to keep [electromagnetic interference] under reasonable control. EMC designates all the ...


15

Its a ferrite core, basically it reduces/filters out interference on the cable.


15

The original eSATA specification does not provide power. You'll need a USB cable or wall adapter to power the hard drive. The new eSATAp specification utilizes the USB bus to provide power over one cable, but is relatively rare. The easiest way to be sure if you have an eSATAp device or not is to check the plug. This helpful image from Wikipedia shows ...


14

I saw the Monster Cable-it system the other day and thought it looked intriguing. Warning: video at that link plays automatically. The difference from other cable management systems is the zipper device that makes it look easy to install. The product is available in three colors (black, white, gray), three diameters (S, M, L) and two lengths (8 and 16 ...


13

Twisted Pair refers to the cable itself. Two conductors inside the cable are wound round each other to cancel out electromagnetic interference. A Twisted Pair cable could carry all kinds of signals. A Crossover Cable refers to how the cable terminators are connected at the end of the cable. In this case the connectors are connected asymmetrically so you ...


12

Typically that noise happens when computer and speakers have different ground levels, explained here. Are you sure that you did not also change anything in that regard, different outlets, etc? Is your pc connected to other devices, antennas, network switches, etc? Try connecting your speakers and computer at the same power outlet, with an extension cord. ...


12

The U in USB means Universal. They're totally interchangeable. I just keep one around and the rest as backups/to lend to others, it works pretty well.


12

You have cable internet and this is either 75 Ohm rg-59 or rg-6 quad shield coaxial with a compression F-connector.


11

Lifehacker has a ton of ways to organise cables - my personal favorites: Using under-the-desk basket thing from Ikea: Go! Using a rain gutter as cable and power pack management. This is my favourite Go! This guy used several techniques, maybe you can make use of them? Go!


11

Another organizing tool (one that I've used myself) is hook-and-loop strips (more familiar as Velcro). They are available from a number of sources. I've bought Case Logic brand at $1 a piece in a six pack (although Provantage has them for a little over half that at $3.26). I bought an eight-pack of no-name ones at a dollar store* the other day for, you ...


11

Pin 1 on a ribbon cable (the cable itself, not the terminators) is usually colored differently than the other pins - often red.


11

It could... possibly. You're not likely to have any problems. Many people do it themselves. If you are already receiving a marginal signal, a splitter might add enough signal loss to cause problems. If you have problems, I would suggest having your cable company install it for you. Most will do it for free (or possibly a small fee). They will have the ...


10

I did the same with conduit. This way you can run regular wire inside and if you ever need to run additional wires you just feed another one through. I did this for my securtiy system and added the Cat 5 later, I am not sure that I wouldn't have just used wireless had I not already put the conduit in there. You can now purchase outdoor rated cable, that is ...



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