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3

You are more likely to find that you have problems with the power that each port is designed to 'hand out'. If you go to your control panel > system > Device Manager > expand universal serial bus controllers and double click on your Generic USB Hubs one by one looking at the second tab on the top. You will see what power the external hub is drawing and how ...


6

Summarizing everything tl;dr The drive before the twist will be drive B while the one on the end will be A. This way there is no need to "configure" the drives which drive (A or B) are they going to be and what they should listen. They can be configured identically and the twist will swap the controlling input for them. Or quoting sawdust: The cable ...


2

Be careful! It all depends on whether one of your two devices supports USB On-The-Go: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_On-The-Go If neither device supports this standard (on the ports you're intending to connect together), then your plan won't work and you risk damaging your devices. The good news is (quoting the above Wikipedia article): Non-OTG ...


8

IBM made the kludge to allow floppy drives (in mainframes) to be changed without need for jumpers. There is also a little cut in most cables to prevent more than one drive from running at the same time - reducing the motor select signals available on the cable. The original spec IBM worked from (the drive mfg's standard) had two cables allowing 4 drives. ...


28

On the PC floppy-drive cable, one of the wires is activated when a request is made to access drive A:, and another is activated when a request is made to access drive B:. Additionally, one wire is activated when the drive A: motor should turn on, while the other does likewise for drive B: (obviously when code is going to want to access drive A: it's going ...


38

if this is a floppy cable that twist serves to select how the first (before twist) and second drive (after the twist) will be A:or B: from http://www.pcguide.com/ref/fdd/confCable-c.html You will also notice that there is an odd "twist" in the floppy cable, located between the two pairs of connectors intended for the floppy drives. Despite the ...


0

A lot of factors also play a role, such as: network latency, actual wifi protocol in use (a, b, g, n, ...), network limits at the serving-side, hardware limits on your side (bus, hdd), practical router limits (as opposed to theoretical limits: Google with your router specs for real performance statistics to get an idea), other traffic on the router, ...



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