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6

This is caused by having f.lux running. Exit f.lux and the color calibration should work properly.


4

Battery issues are not much related to NVRAM/PRAM, but to the SMC. See Apple Portables: Resetting the System Management Controller (SMC). If this is the first time you calibrated your battery: after I purchased a new battery, my Mac would shutdown suddenly when the battery was running low, even after calibration. For some reason, it took me a few ...


4

It really depends what you're doing, and how important the colour-accuracy is. If it's just "so they look the same", you can probably do it by eye. Bring up a photo on both montiors (Macie the KODAK Digital LAD Test Image is good for this), then fiddle with the settings until they look the same. Typically you reset everything on both monitors (which can ...


3

It's likely not the interfaces--just like high-end microphones, the same assembly line turns out monitors with different temperatures, highs, and lows. And like those trinitron lines, if you're sensitive enough to notice the difference it's going to bug the heck out of you no matter what you do. One option: You can use one monitor for visual tasks and one ...


3

Starting with Vista, Microsoft bundles support for ICC color profile calibration with the "Windows Color System." Even though Vista doesn't include a tool to create ICC profiles and the tool in Windows 7 is very basic, you can load any profiles that you generate by other means. If you use the advanced display calibration wizard in OS X, it will generate ICC ...


3

Yeah, you should think about calibrating your monitor. It'll look nicer. Is it something you have to spend money on, and do before ever using it? Not at all. The people who are spending this much money on tools are enthusiasts, who want everything they can get out of their monitor, or work on photographs all day long. When you get your monitor, just fiddle ...


3

Here is some step-by-step instructions with pictures to test your monitor. However our eyes (not actually the eyes, but the brain) is very adaptive "device". Calibration with your eyes is like lottery. You may do it better or worse. I recommend you to buy used color calibration device (and sell it after calibration). I did the same procedure few months ago. ...


3

To stop the display resetting to original settings on startup, thus saving your desired gamma, do the following:- start > run > msconfig > startup > uncheck igfxpers.exe I just found this out today, after weeks of calibrating every time I start up my laptop! :)


3

I had the same problem on my 2006 MacBook pro and it turned out that some batteries manufactured around 2006/2007 were simply broken by production. IIRC, at that time Apple had published an official announcement to replace batteries without cost for computers that qualified for the change. I checked the website and found out that my battery qualified for a ...


2

Short answer, No. Long answer, unless you are doing very intensive photo/video work or a huge videophile you will never see the benefits of a detailed calibrating. I would simply use an image such as the one below and adjust the contrast and brightness until the background looks black instead of grey and only see one black vertical bar on the left. Also, a ...


2

If you are certain it looks odd, get it replaced. But first, try using a different DisplayPort cable and, if possible, another computer. Here's how to install ICC profiles on MacOSX. But if you do print or photography work, you should get a Spyder Monitor Calibrator. I have an older version. You can find them in eBay for reasonable prices.


2

Perception of colors will vary some from projected light (the LCD) than reflected light (a printed card). They will have different brightnesses, and the LCD emits powerful enough to compensate for your "house" lights. I definitely think an electronic tool will be far more accurate than the human eye.


2

No, you don't have to but it doesn't hurt either. If your work is not "color-critical" (and it seems like it isn't) there is no need to do it. But I would recommend it anyway. Only if set up correctly you will get the best picture quality from a high-end monitor. A simple colorimenter like the Pantone Huey should do the job here. It's not too expensive and ...


2

I found this which may help: I prepared this web color tutorial to test, review and troubleshoot internet color problems with the Apple Macintosh OS-X ColorSync® because I was seeing greatly over-saturated colors on the web. Specifically, how the new so-called wide-gamut LCD panel flat monitors display untagged RGB color in a ...


2

As I'm sure you know, monitor calibration is one of the blackest of the black arts of modern computing. I do a lot of photo retouching and video special FX work and I spend way too much of my time worrying whether what I'm seeing is what I'm getting! My recommendation would be a hardware solution of some kind: software only solutions are really not much ...


1

I just matched two Eizo L768 monitors. One is connected via VGA, the other via DVI. As of @bert answer I used the DVI monitor as reference and tried to change the VGA monitors settings to match the DVI monitor. This was my strategy: First I went to http://tft.vanity.dk/monitorTest_scale.html and resized my browser window over both screens. I opened a ...


1

If it's an LCD monitor you can use www.lagom.nl lcd-test following the instructions carefully. And Calibrize if you're using MS Windows.


1

It might not the interface, but the lighting conditions that are slightly different, or other ambient differences. Any differences in wall color or furniture color may make a difference to the light that's arriving at the monitor. Really comparing the monitors must be done under absolutely the same lighting conditions, maybe in pitch darkness.


1

With DVI, the signal is just 0-255 binary information for each subpixel. The monitor is set up to make a decent sRGB image of it with a 2.2 gamma by default. With VGA however, the output can be controlled via software. the DA converter on the videocard translates every 0-255 value into a voltage on the VGA cable. Then the monitor converts the voltage back ...


1

I just matched two Eizo L768 monitors. One is connected via VGA, the other via DVI. As of @bert answer I used the DVI monitor as reference and tried to change the VGA monitors settings to match the DVI monitor. This was my strategy: First I went to http://tft.vanity.dk/monitorTest_scale.html and resized my browser window over both screens. I opened a ...


1

This is complicated issue due to the fact that Illustrator performs zoom based on the document, not comparisons to the real world. Zooming to 100% will always be an approximation, as will Fit to Screen. Since the resolution of the screen can vary on each computer as well as the size of the screen and the size of the document, Adobe makes no secret that ...


1

Run the Windows version of Illustrator. Windows has a option to measure 1 inch on screen, and adjust overal windows scale to it. You could also run the windows Illustrator on you Mac under a virtual machine like with Virtual Box. Apple promised to get rid of its 72dpi heritage with the introduction os OSX 10.0 and make the GUI fully scalable, but we never ...


1

I guess the answer to that will vary depending on the graphics card of the laptop. Usually the manufacturers drivers for your graphics will come with an option to change the settings for each display separately. So if your graphics chipset is an intel one, download the appropriate software and use it to manage your display properties rather than the ...


1

Go into Control Panels, open up Display, and click advanced. If you have an Intel mobile chipset, then you can go to the Intel GMA driver control panel and choose "Color Correction".


1

I'd say it depends on how important color accuracy is to you. Dell actually provides a monitor profile for the U2410 (though it looks like it might have a few issues). Assuming a working color profile from the manufacturer, the colors you see in color managed applications might be 'good enough' for your purposes. If not, acquiring a colorimeter and ...


1

There's a difference between "calibration", which is important only if the colors you're looking at on-screen have to match some other output device, and "tweaking" to make sure that it's set up for what you do. Many modern monitors have an HDMI port - if you have a decent DVD player, hook it up to the monitor, and run one of the THX certified DVDS, which ...


1

Most monitor calibration tools - the ones that come with devices that read the screen - are quite expensive and probably overkill for what you want. There are guides out there - this one for example, and I know that you can get test cards to calibrate the brightness and contrast. You could try these first. Also bear in mind that the free glasses that get ...


1

If you have the time (judging since you're trying to watch Youtube in 3D, very probably), you can do manual calibration. Start by drawing a red (#FF000) square in your favorite image editor surrounded by white, and play with your monitor settings until the red square disappears. Do the same with blue (#0000FF). That may be the easiest way, if not the ...


1

According to what I see from this laptop's specifications, the graphics card is an NVIDIA GeForce 9600M GS. NVIDIA drivers contain a control panel (which should be accessible in the system control panel, from the contextual menu on the desktop, or from a tray icon), in which you can set different parameters, like which 3D effects to use, performance on ...



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