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62

Yes, it should be safe. Just be sure to put your motherboard on something not conductive, like cardboard box, and it should not touch anything that conducts electricity, including your main computer case. I did this few times. If you stop by in almost any computer shop, technicians do this sort of thing routinely.


22

Motherboards follow standard specifications. These specifications include many different metrics and details, such as motherboard dimensions, features, etc. Modern computer chassis (cases) are ATX standard. Most of the cases you will be looking at are ATX. However there are options around this. ATX motherboards will always fit into ATX cases. microATX ...


20

Yes, you can power on the motherboard outside of its case. Just keep some precautions, like laying a piece of cardboard underneath the board, and you're good to go. Also, human body contains static charge, so ground the static by touching a grounded appliance or wiring a ground circuit. Static charge in the human body might damage sensitive electronic ...


17

I personally used canned air (aka difluroethane). Just make sure you don't let the blades of the fan spin while you are spraying the canned air as it may damage something.


15

The really important aspect of cooling is good airflow. Most cases have a front-to-back airflow: air goes in at the front and out at the back. Reasons for this direction include the location of the power supply unit at the back (a major heat generator, so its air must be evacuated directly) and the preference not to blow hot air towards the user of the ...


15

37 degrees should not be a problem at all. Naturally, hard drives differ in their specs, some can run hotter than the others. You should check the published specifications of the drives that you have. For example, WD Caviar Black 1TB operational temperature is -0° C to 60° C. Of course, you would not want your drive to run 60°, as it might reduce its life ...


15

Most of the smell will be in the PSU, cleaning the case will help, but you should replace the PSU, no good way to clean the inside of a PSU of cigarette residue. Example of a heavy computer and cigarette user.


14

Air Freshener sounds like a good idea, least on the short run. Taking apart your computer as far as possible, dismantling all the plastic trim off the case, and wiping down everything non electronic with a solution of vinegar might help - metafilter seems to suggest being in the same vicinity as a bowl of vinegar may help too. The same thread also seems ...


13

There are usually special trays on which you can screw an SSD and then screw the whole tray into a 3.5" slot. Also common is the approach that the tray can fit either a 2.5" SSD or a 3.5" HDD. So no special precautions have to be taken. These should come with your case. This part from the specs hints at the fact, that the trays come with the case and are ...


12

Not the answer you're going to like: Most computer cases are built to both maximize airflow and direct the heat transfer away from the intakes. Pulling cool air in from the front and side then blowing hot air out the back has been fairly standard for decades. The problem with pulling cool air and blowing out hot air from the same side (the front) is that it ...


12

USB3 requires new connectors, with more connections in them. These are backwards compatible, Therefore a USB1/USB2 device will plug into a USB3 host, but this means that unless your case has the new connectors, you can't in a USB3 device. You could still use these connectors for USB1/USB2 devices, or use USB3 devices in a USB1/2 compatibility mode.


12

I would just buy a 2.5" drive and use a mounting kit: Now that they all use the same SATA ports, you just use the same standard connectors as any other hard drive.


11

The point is to remove heat from the case so: heat rises, so fans at the top of the case blow the hot air out and fans at the bottom blow cold air in. fans near hot components (CPU, Power supply, high end graphic cards) blow air out because you want to remove the hot air - not spread it around. you have to have good airflow where hot air is continually ...


10

This is a rather interesting article on the subject. It was our assumption that the tests with ALL the fans in operation would produce the best results but it didn’t. Time to idle represents how effectively the configuration removes heat from the PC case. The shorter the time the better. CPU peak and idle as well as System peak and idle are easy to ...


9

Have a look at the retr0bright page. “The problem was finally cracked in late July 2008 with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide, a small amount of an “Oxy” laundry booster as a catalyst and a UV lamp; we believed that this could do the job in hours instead of days. " Forum support thread on AmiBay. After and before:


8

I once worked on a computer network in a trucking dispatch center. Every piece of equipment I opened up had a layer of brown tar on it. It's sticky and attracts dust which liberally coats everything. Changing out network cards was difficult as the cards had actually been glued into the slots with the mixture of tar and dirt that had accumulated. The first ...


8

The other answers you got are correct: it's definitely doable and something that is done all the time by professional/power/enthusiast users for all sorts of purposes. What I would like to add is that, if you search online, you'll see that a lot of people will turn the motherboard ON using a screwdriver: they simply close the circuit between the 2 power ...


7

They are pretty much standardized and are just little pins that stick up in a certain configuration: These pins look like this:


7

Here's a nifty little tool that allows to you "blow air" (similar to canned air) but through use of manual labor. Unlimited source of air, and gets you a little bit of exercise as well ;)


7

Dude, just flip the fans around in the case.


7

What you want to do is move air through the PC. You want the case to be a bit like a wind tunnel. The best tactic is to have one intake and one outtake. For low noise I recommend a slow moving 12cm fan at each point. Since warm air rises it's also best if your outtake is somewhere high and your intake somewhere low. I happen to have an inexpensive (50 euro) ...


6

The middle spot depends on your case and components. Different case designs need different levels of airflow to cool the same components. Hotter components (faster processors, more disks etc) need more airflow than cooler components (eg laptop processors and SSDs). Significantly, the nominal dB and airflow ratings of fans often have little relation to how ...


6

Fortunately IBM/Lenovo is really good at writing hardware manuals. http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/MIGR-70068.html This one is no exception. Have fun taking it apart.


6

One thing to watch out for is add-in cards coming loose. On some cards, the rear connector bracket is long enough that it hangs below the bottom of the motherboard when the card is plugged in to the motherboard. This isn't a problem in a case when the motherboard is mounted on standoffs, but it can be a problem if you sit the motherboard directly on a hard ...


6

Actually many don't. I'm looking at a HP now that opens on the right when facing its front. The reason is the AT/ATX form factor specification, which specifies the size, orrientation, and holes in the motherboard so it can match the mounting screw holes in the case.


6

Well, all three options are possible. The chassis fan option is definitely the best option - it will do speed control, and will keep the fans running at the required speed. Where possible, this is the best option. Use the chassis fan controllers first The molex/fan connector connected to a molex connector will have the fan running at full speed all the ...


6

Hate to post a link to Wikipedia, but this page has all the maximum size dimensions of a remarkable number of motherboard sizes and form factors. Probably a good place to start when measuring.


5

Static buildup typically occurs in homes due to walking on carpets. There are spray on static treatments for carpets. Before you enter the room and touch the case, discharge the static buildup somewhere else. Screws on light switches tend to be a good place to do this. Another way to reduce static electricity is to increase the humidity in the ...


5

you waste your electrical shielding and get maybe some weird effect in nearby radios, or whatever transmitter - or in case you have strong senders nearby (maybe lay your nice smartphone on the motherboard) you induct some current somewhere on the motherboard, and if its an good one (means on the technological edge) there will be less room for errorcorrection ...


5

The case provides a number of benefits: physical protection. airflow management. Generally, some electronic devices on PCBs operated outside the designed casing can end up running hotter. This probably isn't an issue for short periods of use. Example of desktop PC with fan in case (at top of photo)



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