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20

Yes. This article answers most of your questions. Is there special outdoor-rated cat5e/cat6 I should use? "Preferably, special exterior or direct burial CAT5 cables should be used for outdoor runs instead of ordinary CAT5." If put it in a dug trench, do I need to put it in conduit? "Exterior-grade Ethernet cables are waterproof and thus do not ...


14

The tone generator only sends signals down a pair of cables. You need to send signals down all the pairs - all 4 pairs - to see where the break is. Because most cables are wired to 568B standards, there should be two pair of cable that are unused, and therefore, still viable - which means, you can relocate those strands to replace the damaged ones, and ...


10

I did the same with conduit. This way you can run regular wire inside and if you ever need to run additional wires you just feed another one through. I did this for my securtiy system and added the Cat 5 later, I am not sure that I wouldn't have just used wireless had I not already put the conduit in there. You can now purchase outdoor rated cable, that is ...


10

These handheld devices are useful, since they test the cabling on the physical level and can help discover problems (cross-talk, wrong impedance, etc.) which are difficult to diagnose otherwise. If you pulled some cable too much, or some turn inside your wall is too sharp, your network will "kinda work", but you won't get maximum throughput, or you'll get ...


6

HDMI over CAT-5 "Extenders" just use the Cat-5 network wiring to transmit their signal in place of an HDMI cable. If you put a switch (or alike) between the ends, it won't work. Example There are DVI/HDMI-over-IP solutions out there as well, primarily for digital signage. Example


6

Spare Cat-5/5e/6? Sure. If you need RJ11 instead of RJ45, you'd need to snip off any existing RJ45 connection and replace it with an RJ11. For a single phone line, you only need 1 pair (2 wires) out of the existing 4 (but use a matched pair). For a 4-conductor/2-line RJ11, use 2 pair. For a full 6-conductor/3-line RJ11, use 3 pair. Here's a wiring ...


6

Depending on how old they are and how badly they've been abused, your existing cables may be starting to deteriorate. Plus, if you replace them, you can do spiffy color-coding. Cat 5e can theoretically handle 1gig-e, while Cat 6 can handle 10gig-e; Cat 6 is typically more expensive. Basically, if you buy a quality cable, Cat 5e should do it.


6

CAT5e/6 junction boxes are available for splicing cables without needing to terminate, twist, or soldier. Junction boxes are better for permanent cabling, as they're more secure than terminated ends paired with a coupler, or twisted/soldiered. Cables with these junction boxes won't be pulled apart at the splice point, unlike with other splice methods. ...


4

First and foremost it is absolutely critical that both ends match (at least with respect to wires that are actually used). If a given color originates on pin 3 on one end that same color must be tied to pin 3 on the other end. (This is contrary to phone cables where opposite ends are mirror images.) If you use a coupler to join two cables the coupler has ...


4

First, Cat5e is a UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) spec, not an FTP (foiled) or STP (shielded) spec Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.3 1000BASE-T, supports 1,000,000,000 bits per second signaling over Cat5 and better (5e, 6, etc. ) UTP cabling. After overhead, good software can get 941Mbps of TCP throughput out of that. Sometimes cables talk about what frequencies ...


3

If I had to hazard a guess I would say you probably have a bad cable run from one of the following: RJ45 Jacks not punched completely/correctly (Some pins didn't make it through the sheath and it's enough for your tester to work, but marginal) Bad/Damaged cable run (Your cable is kinked, bent, or otherwise damaged) Interference (Your cable is running next ...


3

Yes, you should test it! The computer may not use all of the pairs... if you're testing with a 100Mbit rather than a Gigabit connection, for example, you're only using two pairs rather than all four. If you don't test this cable properly, it might check out fine on your computer but then fail when you try to use it with a feature like power-over-ethernet, ...


3

Won't write up a full article as others seem to have done a lot better than I could... however... No matter the temptation to save money and use standard cable - DON'T! A few years ago, I had to go to a school that had used standard cat5 cable all over the place and across flat roofs to go building to building. They called me in after a lightning strike ...


3

Not knowing how far the run is, this is how I would do it: Measure the length of the run and using bulk cable, cut eight pieces the length of the run plus enought extra for routing and connection. Group the cables together and pull at one time. GET HELP if possible as it will be a bit unwieldly. Another option would be to cut nine lengths and use one ...


3

As emddudley said, it should plug right in. Just make sure you get the wiring correct. Plugging a phone into a jack wired for ethernet probably won't be a problem. Plugging a network device into a jack wired into the phone system is bad. Phones ring by having a voltage sent down the line, enough to ring a physical bell on old rotary phones. Network ...


2

Cat5e should be good enough for the next few years. If you don't mind crimping your own connectors you can buy a bulk spool of cable from you local big box hardware store. It's much cheaper than buying lots of shorter cables and you can make custom lengths.


2

I'd start looking into buying new Cat5e or Cat6 cables. Cat5e cables are about the same size as Cat5. Cat6 cables are a bit thicker. I just threw out most of my old Cat5 cables and replaced them with pre-made Cat5e ones. I like monoprice.com for cables. I don't crimp my own cables anymore; it's too hard to get a good connection using an inexpensive (~$30) ...


2

The photo in your post looks about right, going by the wiring diagram here: What you are describing is normally called an Ethernet splitter, and they are fairly cheap to buy off the shelf. If you are connecting two PCs together directly, then you either need to ensure their NICs will crossover automatically, or use a crossover cable.


2

Time and time again we have gone with the wifi and it has always been a bad choice. It has bad latency, dropping packets, dropping the link and sometimes the router just needs rebooting. Go with cat5 if possible. If you have to use wifi try to use clear line of sight with all equipment from the same vendor.


1

This depends entirely on the technology used. If they had an internet connection that then went via ethernet to each apartment, then, all you would need to do is plug in your computer and/or router. The term internet ready can be mis-leading. I highly doubt they have just split the cable in an ordinary way, it probably means they have a deal with an ISP ...


1

The power output of one of your lan cards is not strong enough to send a signal through the length of the cable. Replace the lan card and see if that helps. Also make sure you are crimping the cables correctly with two twisted pairs and not accidently using the wrong wires. For example, use both the orange and the green cables and not both orange and one ...


1

http://pinouts.ru/Net/Ethernet10BaseT_pinout.shtml so you need 1,2,3,6 to transmit and received data. Connect the socket 1,2,3,6 to the 1,2,3,6 of the cable for one PC, the socket 1,2,3,6 to the 4,5,7,8 of the cable for the other PC. At the other end, to create a cross cable, connect the 3, 6, 1, 2 to the 1, 2, 3, 6 of the socket for one PC and then 7, 8, 4, ...


1

If the cable works, you're probably good. The cable itself (we're talking copper, not glass here) is pretty foolproof -- hard to damage and unlikely to pick up interference from poor placement unless you do something really stupid. The hard part is the connections. You do, of course, have to get the wire colors right, and you need to get all the wires ...


1

I'm also not an expert but as 100Mbps uses only 4 wires, 1Gbps really needs all 8 (all 4 pairs). 100Mbps does use 1-2-3-6 (like you said) so i'm puzzled as to why you're even getting 100Mbps (with 3&6 swapped). The T568B termination states the wires should be "straight through" ( i.e., pins 1 through 8 on one end are connected to pins 1 through 8 on the ...


1

Twisted pair is there for a reason - it works as a shield and reduces interference. Is not like people had too much copper and they have decided to waste it and twist network cables "for fun". Lack of it will introduce interference and that will introduce packet loss. Will it work? Possibly. You have to try it - we don't know how long are those cables, what ...


1

I'm retired now, but when I had my shop I had a sign that said "If you don't have time to do it right, do you have time to do it again? I ran cat5 cable to my shop (approx. 300 feet) in grey plastic pipe underground, because the powerline units seemed to be rather intermittent. Like someone said, remember to also pull a string - preferably a nylon one that ...


1

Here in Algonquin Park (Northern Ontario, Canada) we run electrical, propane, phone and data cables everywhere underground, we use 75# black poly water pipe, it's cheap and plentiful, comes in sizes up to 4", you can make it any length with connectors and it is flexible; you can curve around rocks and roots, etc. When burying anything, always put a 2x4 or ...



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