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21

Yes. This article answers most of your questions. Is there special outdoor-rated cat5e/cat6 I should use? "Preferably, special exterior or direct burial CAT5 cables should be used for outdoor runs instead of ordinary CAT5." If put it in a dug trench, do I need to put it in conduit? "Exterior-grade Ethernet cables are waterproof and thus do not ...


14

The tone generator only sends signals down a pair of cables. You need to send signals down all the pairs - all 4 pairs - to see where the break is. Because most cables are wired to 568B standards, there should be two pair of cable that are unused, and therefore, still viable - which means, you can relocate those strands to replace the damaged ones, and ...


11

These handheld devices are useful, since they test the cabling on the physical level and can help discover problems (cross-talk, wrong impedance, etc.) which are difficult to diagnose otherwise. If you pulled some cable too much, or some turn inside your wall is too sharp, your network will "kinda work", but you won't get maximum throughput, or you'll get ...


11

I did the same with conduit. This way you can run regular wire inside and if you ever need to run additional wires you just feed another one through. I did this for my securtiy system and added the Cat 5 later, I am not sure that I wouldn't have just used wireless had I not already put the conduit in there. You can now purchase outdoor rated cable, that is ...


7

Spare Cat-5/5e/6? Sure. If you need RJ11 instead of RJ45, you'd need to snip off any existing RJ45 connection and replace it with an RJ11. For a single phone line, you only need 1 pair (2 wires) out of the existing 4 (but use a matched pair). For a 4-conductor/2-line RJ11, use 2 pair. For a full 6-conductor/3-line RJ11, use 3 pair. Here's a wiring ...


7

CAT5e/6 junction boxes are available for splicing cables without needing to terminate, twist, or soldier. Junction boxes are better for permanent cabling, as they're more secure than terminated ends paired with a coupler, or twisted/soldiered. Cables with these junction boxes won't be pulled apart at the splice point, unlike with other splice methods. ...


6

HDMI over CAT-5 "Extenders" just use the Cat-5 network wiring to transmit their signal in place of an HDMI cable. If you put a switch (or alike) between the ends, it won't work. Example There are DVI/HDMI-over-IP solutions out there as well, primarily for digital signage. Example


6

Building a new house gives you an oportunity to get lots of cables in without having to lift up floor boards later. I'd say go for it and get cabled. Also, use cat6.


6

Depending on how old they are and how badly they've been abused, your existing cables may be starting to deteriorate. Plus, if you replace them, you can do spiffy color-coding. Cat 5e can theoretically handle 1gig-e, while Cat 6 can handle 10gig-e; Cat 6 is typically more expensive. Basically, if you buy a quality cable, Cat 5e should do it.


5

First and foremost it is absolutely critical that both ends match (at least with respect to wires that are actually used). If a given color originates on pin 3 on one end that same color must be tied to pin 3 on the other end. (This is contrary to phone cables where opposite ends are mirror images.) If you use a coupler to join two cables the coupler has ...


5

First, you're correct in saying that it's not linked to CSMA/CD. Second, you referenced a common, but incorrect belief that CSMA/CD was the reason for 10Base-T [half-duplex] 100m limit. This was a reason for - as you called it - classic Ethernet network length of 2500m (with ample margin - minimum frame of 64 bytes at 10Mb/s would 'occupy' around 11000m ...


4

First, Cat5e is a UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) spec, not an FTP (foiled) or STP (shielded) spec Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.3 1000BASE-T, supports 1,000,000,000 bits per second signaling over Cat5 and better (5e, 6, etc. ) UTP cabling. After overhead, good software can get 941Mbps of TCP throughput out of that. Sometimes cables talk about what frequencies ...


4

I'd use conduit for ease of maintenance. If a cable goes bad, you can pull new cable though the conduit with out having to dig up and rebury the cable. I would still use an exterior rated cable.


4

Won't write up a full article as others seem to have done a lot better than I could... however... No matter the temptation to save money and use standard cable - DON'T! A few years ago, I had to go to a school that had used standard cat5 cable all over the place and across flat roofs to go building to building. They called me in after a lightning strike ...


4

You can plug standard "square" RJ14 cables into a RJ45 jack, as long as the port is wired to your phone line. It should click in. You need to figure out which ports are wired where.


3

As emddudley said, it should plug right in. Just make sure you get the wiring correct. Plugging a phone into a jack wired for ethernet probably won't be a problem. Plugging a network device into a jack wired into the phone system is bad. Phones ring by having a voltage sent down the line, enough to ring a physical bell on old rotary phones. Network ...


3

Not knowing how far the run is, this is how I would do it: Measure the length of the run and using bulk cable, cut eight pieces the length of the run plus enought extra for routing and connection. Group the cables together and pull at one time. GET HELP if possible as it will be a bit unwieldly. Another option would be to cut nine lengths and use one ...


3

Yes, you should test it! The computer may not use all of the pairs... if you're testing with a 100Mbit rather than a Gigabit connection, for example, you're only using two pairs rather than all four. If you don't test this cable properly, it might check out fine on your computer but then fail when you try to use it with a feature like power-over-ethernet, ...


3

I'd start looking into buying new Cat5e or Cat6 cables. Cat5e cables are about the same size as Cat5. Cat6 cables are a bit thicker. I just threw out most of my old Cat5 cables and replaced them with pre-made Cat5e ones. I like monoprice.com for cables. I don't crimp my own cables anymore; it's too hard to get a good connection using an inexpensive (~$30) ...


3

The photo in your post looks about right, going by the wiring diagram here: What you are describing is normally called an Ethernet splitter, and they are fairly cheap to buy off the shelf. If you are connecting two PCs together directly, then you either need to ensure their NICs will crossover automatically, or use a crossover cable.


3

If I had to hazard a guess I would say you probably have a bad cable run from one of the following: RJ45 Jacks not punched completely/correctly (Some pins didn't make it through the sheath and it's enough for your tester to work, but marginal) Bad/Damaged cable run (Your cable is kinked, bent, or otherwise damaged) Interference (Your cable is running next ...


3

There are standards for the certification of copper cable that define tests that the cable must pass to be certified. The one covering Cat5 is TIA/EIA-568. Source The Evolution of Copper Cabling Systems from Cat5 to Cat5e to Cat6 The TIA-EIA-568-A standard defined the testing limits for the following parameters for testing Category 5 cabling ...


2

I do tech support and the argument of TIA-568A vs TIA-568B vs 'whatever, but straight through" comes up every now and again. You should use the appropriate standard for your application. Since you're referring to Ethernet, you should use Cat5e or Cat6 cable and terminate with the TIA-568B pinout. TIA-568A This standard is acceptable/meant for voice ...


2

You need CAT5E to attain gigabit speed. CAT5 does not support 1000BASE-T (=gigabit). There are some exceptions - it is then marked on the cable that it supports it, i.e. "verified for gigabit ethernet".


2

Cat5e should be good enough for the next few years. If you don't mind crimping your own connectors you can buy a bulk spool of cable from you local big box hardware store. It's much cheaper than buying lots of shorter cables and you can make custom lengths.


2

However tempted you are to run Cat5 or Cat6 between buildings, DON'T. Apart from the issues of lightning strikes and proximity to power cables causing interference, you can get surprisingly high differences in local earth potential due to varying soil/ground conductivity Whilst equipment will probably handle the voltages involved, the poor schmuck who ...


2

Have you considered using a powerline ethernet connection? Obviously you have power going to the out-bulding. No digging, no lightning strikes to worry about. Probably cheaper too. Also allows every outlet to become a computer connection.



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