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The official CentOS documentation says the hostname should be the FQDN. HOSTNAME=<value>, where <value> should be the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN), such as hostname.example.com, but can be whatever hostname is necessary. During the CentOS 7 installation in the INSTALLATION SUMMARY screen of the CentOS 7 installer, click on the ...


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You were looking in the wrong place for documentation. Always check the official sources first. For ffmpeg, the packages provided by distributions are always more or less outdated. Basically, you have two options: Install a static build, which is already compiled and ready for use. Go to the download page and select the "Linux Static Builds", not the ...


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Just found the answer in one of the "Readme" files http://centos.ufes.br/6.7/isos/i386/0_README.txt CentOS-6.7-i386-netinstall.iso This is the network install and rescue image. This image is designed to be burned onto a CD. You then boot your computer off the CD. CentOS-6.7-i386-minimal.iso The aim of this image is to install a very basic ...


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Answer taken from AskUbuntu question: This is a really old bug, still not fixed for metacity. One workaround is to use great combo Alt + "Hold Right Mouse Button" and resize window according to nearest border Another is to manually change theme border size. Default theme configuration file path: ...


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One or both of these two things are probably blocking you. The windows firewall has three Classifications, Domain, Private, and Public. By default ICMP Type=Echo is disabled on the windows firewall for all classifications. Sometimes the network, which is the software side of the hardware interface doesn't get properly assigned to a firewall ...


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We need more information about which certificate issuer is untrusted. Based on the recommendations in this support thread: Paste chrome://pippki/content/exceptionDialog.xul into the URL bar and hit enter. In the window that appears, type https://www.google.com into the Server Location field and click "Get Certificate". Read the "Issued By" field, and paste ...


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Assuming you have a simple httpd configuration, a neat way to implement what you are looking for would be: Create a file named /etc/httpd/conf.d/gitlab.conf with the contents: ProxyPass "/gitlab" "http://123.456.789:8888" ProxyPassReverse "/gitlab" "http://123.456.789:8888" Create another file named /etc/httpd/conf.d/kanban.conf with the contents: ...


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The only person who can set a reverse DNS is the owner of the IP addresses, such as the service provider who purchased them in large block quantities. I don't think it's something most internet or server customers have access to. You have to open a ticket with your provider and ask them to do it for you on their systems. A description of the problem: ...


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Hmm do you really want to kill your server? So don' t use "\;" in find /path/to/directory -type f -exec rm {} \; This command will run a "rm" command for EACH file! Use the "find" command the right way: find /directory/ -name ‘*’ -exec rm {} + this will call the "rm" command only for found files. And your server will thank you! ;) ;) ;)


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As mentioned in your own answer and the one given by @Fegnoid, exporting the variables in a .sh file inside /etc/profile.d/ or in ~/.bash_profile would do the trick. Keep in mind that if you intend to use these environment variables in a service script, it might not work as you expect since service purges all environment variables except a few. See ...



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