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19

Most wireless stacks do not consider these networks to be different to each other, so 2.4GHz has the same weighting as 5GHz. If this isn't important to you, then keeping the SSIDs the same will mean it will pick whichever it sees first. If you keep the SSIDs different, it means that you can prioritise 5GHz over 2.4GHz by adding both to your Wi-Fi ...


18

If you have high quality Wi-Fi client devices, it's best to use the same SSID for both bands so your clients will automatically roam to the band that suits their needs best. If you have low-quality Wi-Fi client devices, you might need to second-guess their band-choice decisions, so you might want to have separate SSIDs. Your MacBook Pro should not have ...


14

1. Cisco VPN with pre-shared key Assume you have been given connection information for a Cisco VPN server: Host: 64.34.199.12 Group ID: SUPERVENDOR Password: *318#($@ User ID: ian@superuser.com Password: ianvendor1234 These are the steps to use ShrewSoft VPN to connect to the Cisco VPN server, rather than the Cisco client: Create a ...


13

The problem with Anyconnect is that it first modifies the routing table, then babysits it and fixes it up should you modify it manually. I found a workaround for this. Works with version 3.1.00495, 3.1.05152, 3.1.05170, and probably anything else in the 3.1 family. May work with other versions, at least similar idea should work assuming the code does not get ...


13

Cisco IPsec vs. L2TP (over IPsec) The term Cisco IPsec is just a marketing ploy which basically means plain IPsec using ESP in tunnel mode without any additional encapsulation, and using the Internet Key Exchange protocol (IKE) to establish the tunnel. IKE provides several authentication options, preshared keys (PSK) or X.509 certificates combined with ...


11

L2TP vs PPTP L2TP/IPSec and PPTP are similar in the following ways: provide a logical transport mechanism to send PPP payloads; provide tunneling or encapsulation so that PPP payloads based on any protocol can be sent across an IP network; rely on the PPP connection process to perform user authentication and protocol configuration. Some facts about PPTP: ...


7

This is VERY convoluted, but if you create a minimal VM using VMWare Player or similar, and run the Cisco AnyConnect VPN client in that, it might be possible to set up routing as you want using the VMWare virtual network adapters, or simply use the VM for access to whatever resources are required via the Cisco SSL VPN and "drag/drop" files to/from your ...


7

Why not start with the management guide? http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps606/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a008007d10e.html It should cover everything you need. But to get you started. You need a direct console connection (com port connection), configure your terminal emulation program for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, ...


7

There are three speeds you need to take into account with wireless routers: Wireless LAN speed: This is the max speed you will get between the router and all computers connected to the wireless router cumulatively. The speed may be lower if there is interference from other sources, or even just from heavy traffic from your own wireless devices. Wired LAN ...


7

The PuTTY program is not built into Linux. What the other person meant is that most Linux systems come with commands that provide the same functionality as PuTTY: The SSH client is ssh. The Telnet client is telnet. The serial console clients are screen and minicom. To connect to the first serial port using screen, run: screen /dev/ttyS0 Press CtrlA ...


7

I finally found out what was causing this. A single answer by Chad Roeder on the Cisco support forums had the right solution: Open Microsoft Management Console (type mmc in Run or search). Add Snap-in "Certificates" (File -> Add/Remove Snap-in... -> [find and add "Certificates] -> OK) Go to folder Personal/Certificates Remove any unwanted certificates (for ...


6

To modify a wireless network's profile... Open the Control Panel and click Network and Internet. Click Network and Sharing Center. Click Manage wireless networks on the left pane. Right-click on the wireless network and click Properties. Click on the Security tab and edit the key in the Network security key field. Note: If you don't want to ...


5

Anyone who is trying to access your network illicitly can find it regardless of whether you hide the SSID or not. Your network will ALWAYS broadcast its presence, no matter which setting you choose. Conversely, if you hide the SSID, your users will be confused ("I can't find the network!") whenever they try to connect for the first time. Save yourself a ...


5

you would need to use ssh or telnet depending on how the router is set up. Putty Would be a good software to use


4

Your addressing is indeed wrong :-( First entry is correct, but second is fundamentally wrong. Prefix and mask is ok, but network and range is not. You cannot have a network .4 with a prefix of 27. 27 prefix says - 27 most significant bits of address specifies network. Rest of 32 bits is filled with 0. So last octet must be: xxx00000. When you ...


4

for gnu ping ping -b -f <bcast addr> This will flood ping the broadcast address however you must be the superuser to do so ( aka root ). In my very limited test sending 2 packets generated over 183 responses so make sure you do not do this on a production network for long.


4

Go to your system tray icon click on wireless network icon, right click the desired network, click on properties Click on show Characters and change the Network Security Key above it.


4

Try deleting line 5 in /root/.ssh/known_hosts! EDIT: Please also consider what @FrankThomas said in the comments to your question


4

Your switch supports VLANs, so you should easily be able to accompish what your trying to do by simply setting them up properly. You'll want to put your router on 192.168.1.1 in the default VLAN(or wherever you want it to be). Then create two new VLAN, (3)192.168.3.0/24 and (4)192.168.4.0/24. Once you've done this, you'll need to "tag" the ports and place ...


4

Use the Cisco Connect program and choose Guest access to adjust settings for the Guest network. It should also be noted that some of these newer Linksys/Cisco devices do not yet have the ability to disable that network on the router firmware and thus require the client software - an unfortunate oversight.


4

You're thinking in terms of connection to the internet. Remember, that a router is also responsible for connections to a local network as well. So, if you had a couple of machines on the same network and transferred files between them, then you may want such speeds.


4

I believe you will need to setup split tunneling with a exclude list. So you don't tunnel your local lan traffic and everything else goes out the tunnel. This has to be configured on the ASA itself. Then in AnyConnect enable the option 'Enable local LAN access (if configured)'. You can enable it manually by clicking on the "preferences" button next to the ...


4

It sounded to me like you were connecting at 100BT speeds, so I checked that the time was right by going here: http://adamsworld.name/copy_calc.php?do (enter 4.5, Gigabytes, Mbits/sec, 100 and calculate to see that it is about 7:05 with a 10% overhead). Then I checked the stats on your Router, and it only has 10/100BT ports. That is your bottleneck. ...


4

As far as I understand, "network address" as a special address is an artifact from the classful IP networks from the past. Today, we use Classless Inter-domain Routing (CIDR) on the Internet, which does not have the concept of a network address (if you look at the RFC 4632 linked above, you'll see that it lists 256 possible IP addresses per legacy "C" block, ...


4

You don't have to install iTerm if you don't want to. You can use screen /dev/tty.<your usb device> 9600. I found this solution on http://etherealmind.com/serial-console-on-osx/ hope this helps.


3

It is simple to get the SSID but it may stop the casual user who sees the SSID and then tries to get connected. As you say, strong security will help much more than not broadcasting SSID.


3

10G means 10Gbps (gigabits per second). That would be like 10000Base-T. The RJ-45 ports on your switch only do 1000Base-T, or 1G (1Gbps). Sometimes the sfp ports, with the right mini-gbic module, can go faster. The link you supplied, though, indicates that these ports are also limited to 1Gbps. It's also worth nothing here that the "G"s in this ...


3

My company still uses that vpn. The vpnc client simply changes you iptables settings that way : # iptables-save # Generated by iptables-save v1.4.10 on Sun Jun 17 14:12:20 2012 *filter :INPUT DROP [0:0] :FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0] :OUTPUT DROP [0:0] -A INPUT -s 123.244.255.254/32 -d 192.168.0.14/32 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -i tun0 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -i lo0 -j ACCEPT ...


3

Shrew Soft VPN software did the trick for me, also, as Ian Boyd suggested. It can import Cisco VPN client profiles. I have used Cisco VPN Client version 5.0.05.0290, and after installing the Shrew VPN (version 2.1.7) and importing Cisco profile, I was able to access local LAN while connected to corporate VPN without any additional configuration of Shrew VPN ...


3

Cisco Compatible eXtensions (CCX) are a set of Cisco-proprietary additions to the 802.11 family of wireless LAN (WLAN) protocols. In general, if you're connecting to a WLAN that uses Cisco enterprise-class gear, you should enable them. If not, it probably doesn't matter much. In the 802.11 WLAN market, Cisco usually rolls out new Cisco-proprietary features ...



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