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16

You cannot set a CNAME record for a root domain (e.g., example.com) because that would break RFC 1034 section 3.6.2, which states, If a CNAME RR is present at a node, no other data should be present; this ensures that the data for a canonical name and its aliases cannot be different. You can’t do this for example.com because example.com will also have ...


5

My hosting provider took about 2 minutes to spot the problem. Turns out I had forgotten to add periods to the end of the target and destination hostnames. Problem solved! "The issue is that you are missing a period "." at the end of each hostname, on both the left side and on the right hand side. When you don't enter a period at the end, DNS translates ...


3

If you are using the Google App Mail Service then the answer is kind of straight forward. Google itself is providing a help document for a catch all address, which can be found here. It basically requires you to sign in to the Google Admin Console either go to Settings > Gmail or Google Apps > Gmail > User Settings Set Up the Catch All Address I hope ...


3

You can not set naked domain name in CNAME records. You must have to do ONLY those settings for alias domains like www.example.com , about.example.com and more at CNAME records and the primary or ROOT domain settings must be done at A Records and you have to provide IP address of host. First delete the settings from CNAME about the naked domain and set it ...


3

The DNS and the server configuration are two different things. For the DNS you will either need a CNAME or an A record for your new subdomain so that it will resolve to the correct IP. The difference is that CNAMEs resolve to other hostnames while A records resolve to IPs. For example: subdomain.example.com CNAME -> example.com subdomain.example.com A ...


2

The A record is what translates the name to IP address. e.g. mydomain.com = 1.2.3.4 The CNAME is an alias for an A record. e.g. www.mydomain.com = mydomain.com So without the A record the CNAME wouldn't go anywhere. Wikipedia source As far as Google going to the right place and not thinking there are two sites mydomain.com and www.mydomain.com, I've heard ...


2

Error 500 normally means error on the side of the server, which in your case is the router itself. The router administration page is not like any other page, since it is served by the router, not by any other computer in your network. This might be a problem with your router's settings. If you can't find it, you might considering resetting it to initial ...


2

cname is an indirection (alias) so it is slower, because it looks up and get an A record, which then looks up your ip. you can even cname a cname. so for efficiency you want to use a record. however, it is not a cut and dry thing really so you just have to weigh it and see which way to go. i am not familiar with cpanel so cannot answer that part.


2

Connect via FTP to your website, go to the document root, and create, or edit, the file called .htaccess. Your document root should contain either index.php or index.html file. That's how you know it's the document root. If the file exists, edit it. Otherwise, create it. Now, edit that file, and make sure you have the following content. Some lines may ...


2

You can't do that. Name service for your domain is controlled from the name servers for your domain. If you don't want to change them, then you have to change the name settings on those servers.


2

ISP-B is using virtual hosting to route requests. Your IP and port is shared so your host can only separate requests to different sites by using the URL sent by the client. They are only serving your site when a client asks for the domain you have registered to them. Your browser will request the URL that you have entered in address bar regardless of the ...


1

Imagine the DNS looks like this: isp-a.domain.com. A 10.10.10.10 www.isp-a.domain.com. CNAME isp-a.domain.com. isp-b.domain.com. A 20.20.20.20 www.isp-b.domain.com. CNAME ipa-b.domain.com. assuming isp-b.domain.com resolves to YOUR website, the cname will work regardless of the IP. with it being shared, perhaps your issue is that port 80/443 is ...


1

CNames or canonical names basically let you alias one domain name to another - this makes it simpler if you have lots of domain names pointing at the same server - for example, you had seperate domain names for FTP, different domain names for vhosts and so on.In this case na4.salesforce.com points at na4-was.salesforce.com, which then points at somewhere ...


1

you would add the following to your DNS server: www.mk12.gotdns.com 86400 CNAME mk12.gotdns.com where: Host: www.mk12.gotdns.com TTL: 86400 (1 day in this case) Record Type: CNAME Data: mk12.gotdns.com


1

You can't use a CNAME that way. Each domain has to have its own authority record and nameservers, so it can't be an alias for something else. How would you determine if the CNAME entry was still valid? You can't check the CNAME record itself because you don't know that it's valid. And you can't follow the CNAME to check because you don't know it's valid. It ...


1

I'm using wildcards for years now and have never had any problems with it. So far I found that a Windows mobile phone in 2003 was the only device that did not handle the wildcard correctly. IMHO using wildcards is very common today and problems only arise rarely. From the security point of view you get a few additional attack vectors. You may for example ...


1

There are no such security issues. I must point out, however, that DNS provides no mechanism to "redirect" per se any requests; a CNAME defines an alias for another DNS name, but an HTTP server is required to actually "redirect" the browser -- otherwise a user who visits whatever.example.com will see whatever.example.com in their browser address bar still, ...


1

basically there is an apache/whatever header directive that redirects it to your site. It will be a very small amount of data ( check out 301/ moved permanently headers for more ). For scaling it to millions, this kind of data ( username (key) -> custom domain(value) ) you could store the data for all the users in a memory mapped hash and then put a squid ( ...


1

[..] a CNAME to my domain which is linked to the dyndns address (router.mydomain.com). [..] if anyone enters the address router.mydomain.com [..] there's no way of knowing it's a dyndns address (or is there?) Surely people (or firewalls) could see it's a CNAME, like see dig www.superuser.com: ;; ANSWER SECTION: www.superuser.com. 21600 IN ...


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You have to add a ServerAlias for this other hostname.


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Extended version of JohnD's answer When more than one virtualhost exist in Apache and it get request for host, not known to it (through ServerName or ServerAlias), it returns first virtualhost in list. In order to get dummy.domain.com instead of drewnett, you have to add drewnett as alias for "main" host


1

Well, the hosts file is formatted as "IP_address hostname..." (as many hostnames as you need), so you could put the ip, followed by both abc.com and xyz.com. It's not designed to work as a local CNAME. It's a local resolver (think A record type action)...


1

Edit the DNS records and set the A record for www.example.com to the IP-address of the hosting server at a.n.other web-hosting service. Keep the MX records pointing to the names of XO's SMTP servers.



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