Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I figured it out. This is what I did: 1) Created 2 bat files in a folder called C:\Launchers--one for launching CMD as system and one for PS 2) Downloaded the latest version of SysinternalsSuite and placed the folder in C:\ 3) Pinned a shortcut to my taskbar and then did the following: A) set the shortcut "Target:" field to: C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe ...


0

Two things: You can use Powershell profiles to customize the shell You can simply change the shell properties (color, font size, buffer) - they persist after all Both works without having to use external tools like psexec. Your approach is overly complicated. Just create a shortcut to Powershell, then go open the link's properties and set the "Start in" ...


1

There is short and incomplete list in man mkfs in see also section http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man8/mkfs.8.html mkdosfs(8), mke2fs(8), mkfs.bfs(8), mkfs.ext2(8), mkfs.ext3(8), mkfs.ext4(8), mkfs.minix(8), mkfs.msdos(8), mkfs.vfat(8), mkfs.xfs(8) And there is longer list in list of all standard Linux mans: ...


2

If this is output intended to be read by a human, then simply: % man mkfs.fat or % man mkdosfs These are in Section 8, a section of the Linux Programmer's Manual. Section 8 covers administration and privileged commands. This assumes you have the appropriate package containing this manual page installed. It should mention FAT12, FAT16, and FAT32 for ...


0

cat /proc/filesystems | grep -v nodev That will list all of the filesystems supported by your kernel that can be associated with physical disk devices.


0

Most likely the -g remains for compatibility with certain older versions. Note that arp and various other tools were originally imported from BSD, along with the entire TCP/IP stack. The BSD arp command uses -a. (So does the SunOS one, apparently.) It is possible that either the -a in Windows arp was accidentally changed to -g, then changed back, or that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included