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-1

Based on skimming the below resources it does sound plausible that one could determine what files where burned to a CD/DVD. In short, using a query (see below) you can obtain the CD/DVD burning service starting, running for several minutes, and shutting down. The usefulness of this information can be correlated with other kinds of artifacts, based on time ...


0

There are a few things you can do. One is to use an archival grade media such as Verbatim UltraLife, which is what I use for important local backups. Test results I have seen show they may resist degradation under optimal conditions substantially longer than an econ disc. The improvement seems to be mostly in the oxidative resistance of the reflective ...


1

I work for a CD duplication/replication company and the users who have mentioned CD text are spot on. This data is added during the mastering process to provide naming information for hte disc, artist and tracks as well as ISRC codes which help track radio play and royalties to pay the artist. While many in car systems read CD text, most labels and artists ...


0

Lumension or similar product can log what has been copied to USB, external harddrives, CDs and DVDs. But that would be more of an enterprise solution.


6

Not intended as an answer, but it doesn't quite fit in a comment. Actually, even the oldest CD Audio standard made it possible for a wealth of meta-data as a very slow bit-rate on the side of the audio data. It's actually so heavily utilised, that not just the track number, and the TOC (with the track offsets) are stored as meta-data, in the lead-in silent ...


1

They are not WAV files with metadata, it is one continuous "file". See this article about detailed explanation. http://www.techsupportalert.com/how_to_work_with_audio_cd_cda_files.htm From the link: If you view the contents of a music CD from Windows, you'll see that it contains a number of .CDA files each corresponding to a song track. (CDA stands for ...


2

Audio CDs don't have any files at all. The tracks' data is compatible with WAV format, but their appearance as files is faked by Explorer and the Windows' CDFSs driver. (Some CD formats even have a data track alongside audio tracks, in which case Explorer doesn't show the audio tracks at all.) Although I remember Windows 98 actually had a third-party ...


7

After asking this question I thought to make a test on 10 audio cds of classical music. They are produced in various countries, mostly in Europe, but one or two in USA. First, on the CD-Text part - the info contained on the cd itself that is therefore accessible offline: the thing to do is to see the info that various players display offline about different ...


52

Shouldn't such info already be available on the music CD itself? I think most of us, as consumers, would say yes. And is it there? Almost never in my experience. Certainly the software I have used to rip CDs to MP3s never seems to be able to obtain this information from the CD itself. I have read of a few exceptions (notably Sony since 1997). ...


3

What you are seeing is called Metadata, and are basically tags added onto the music file, but they are not part of the music file itself. They are not taken from the internet, although if you use some internet music services they can be added onto the music file automatically. Often files on cds have these tags, but most of the time (in my experience) they ...


54

The specifications for storing music on CDs is called Red Book. There is an extension for Red Book called CD-Text. It allows for storage of additional information (text as album name, song name, and artist name) on a Red Book compliant audio CD. Some hardware players are able to read CD-Text, however not all discographic labels include that information on ...



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