Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

61

Yes, it should be safe. Just be sure to put your motherboard on something not conductive, like cardboard box, and it should not touch anything that conducts electricity, including your main computer case. I did this few times. If you stop by in almost any computer shop, technicians do this sort of thing routinely.


48

According to several manufacturers, mounting a 3/5" hard drive horizontally, vertically, or sideways doesn't affect the hard drive life significantly. These are statements taken from the hard drive literature at each manufacturer's website; it's four years old but things probably haven't changed much. Hitachi: The drive will operate in all axes (6 ...


40

In short, no Liquid cooling is still mainly for bragging rights. Getting those extra MHz from hardware and pushing for extra benchmark points. Will you need something aftermarket to cool your system? Absolutely. Of course keeping temperatures as low as possible is always a thing we strive for, but you have to weigh up the costs and risks to the ...


31

It's called "coil whine". It is not harmful, just annoying. You can learn more about it on Wikipedia: These coils, which may act as inductors or transformers, have a certain resonant frequency when coupled with the rest of the electric circuit, as well as a resonance at which it will tend to physically vibrate. Basically you can not do much about it, ...


27

What they are referring to is that the case is typically used as the negative (earth) ground for the motherboard. If you spraypaint, there is a possibility that the screws that go through the motherboard won't actually get a good bite into the case metal and the motherboard will not be electrically grounded. This can cause all sorts of strange errors to ...


25

From looking up some stats on Sandy Bridge CPU temperatures it seems your 60 degrees Celcius is indeed quite high. Should you be worried? Well not if it stays at 60 degrees Celcius, so I recommend you do a stress test like Super Pi or Prime95 and keep an eye out what this does to the temperature. Looking at some overclocking temperatures from ...


25

I think it comes from a handful of factors: Demand. For the last few years, laptops have been outselling desktops. Want to make a product appeal to the largest possible audience? Make it work with a laptop. Compatibility. Since mounting kit adapters exist and are relatively inexpensive, making the drives 2.5" allows for the most users. Many new desktop ...


22

Motherboards follow standard specifications. These specifications include many different metrics and details, such as motherboard dimensions, features, etc. Modern computer chassis (cases) are ATX standard. Most of the cases you will be looking at are ATX. However there are options around this. ATX motherboards will always fit into ATX cases. microATX ...


22

There are two versions of the ATX power supply connector. Version 1, was a 20 pin connector (2x10), and Version 2 is a 24 pin connector (2x12): . The -5V pin is no longer present on the version 2 connector, but otherwise pins remain in the same relative location (although numbered differently for pins 11 upwards). For backward compatibility, some power ...


21

It shouldn't matter which way you do it these days. But there's one possible caveat of making it vertical: Under situations where cooling is at premium and you don't have the means to increase cooling of your system, mounting the disk horizontally with the label facing upwards could be seen as an advantage, since heat rises away from the disk surface more ...


20

Yes, you can power on the motherboard outside of its case. Just keep some precautions, like laying a piece of cardboard underneath the board, and you're good to go. Also, human body contains static charge, so ground the static by touching a grounded appliance or wiring a ground circuit. Static charge in the human body might damage sensitive electronic ...


19

Read this excellent post http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000665.html The easiest way to build a quiet PC is to start with components that run cool. Minimize the number of fans in your system. Control the speed of your fans. Consider aftermarket cooling solutions. Dampen your hard drive. Use noise-reduction materials. Passive cooling isn't ...


19

Silent PC Review (SPCR) is the place to go for for this.


17

As long as you take proper ESD precautions and research your parts compatability properly it's safer than it's ever been. Motherboard choice will be dependent on CPU choice. RAM is easy - DDR3 is pretty much the only standard in use ATM (mid 2012), DDR2 is considered legacy and DDR4 isn't ready yet - higher numbers are compatible with lower requirements. ...


16

It should be, given that in the same amount of time, it could've been attached to a CPU and has to enure that as well. If you don't trust it, just scrape it off and apply fresh coolingpaste (which is different than those strips. The paste can actually dry out. Journeyman Geek points out that if its slightly hard it should be ok, if it crumbles like dried ...


16

does it mean that this mother board will be compatible with processors (from Intel) which will be released next year? You should firstly decide on a processor, more specifically a socket. Intel's processors are well known in the LGA 1155 socket series. They bring out new generations every year based on that socket. Then your motherboard should obviously ...


15

How much spare time do you have, and how much is it worth to you? Building a computer can be a lot of fun, but it's expensive in terms of time compared with the money you can save by finding the exact parts you want at the best price. I used to build my own stuff quite a bit, but now being married with kids I'll take "hassle free" any day of the week.


13

There is a similar question here: Which PC components make the biggest impact on your compile times for Visual Studio. The biggest bottleneck is going to be the disk drive when doing builds in Visual Studio. As of Visual Studio 2008, you can also take advantage of multiple processors or multiple cores during your builds. If it were me, I'd go with the ...


12

Yes! My company is a UK OEM and I assemble laptops (not promoting my company here, just general advice!), You want to Google ODM (Original Design Manufacturer) and try to find resellers of the chassis. It is unlikely as a individual that you will be able to buy direct, however if you find out the chassis and model numbers, you can Google and try to find a ...


12

http://www.firingsquad.com/guides/power_supply/ http://forums.techarena.in/guides-tutorials/1093105.htm Here are a few guides to help you understand better. Get a decent estimate of what your computer power requirements are because you want a power supply with a higher wattage rating then your needs. Make sure to get the most efficient power supply you ...


12

I would just buy a 2.5" drive and use a mounting kit: Now that they all use the same SATA ports, you just use the same standard connectors as any other hard drive.


12

The OS cannot split an individual single-threaded process across multiple cores (although it may change which core an application is running on, but that's a different question), however it can run multiple processes, each on its own core. So, yes, if you have multiple processor intensive applications running in the background, it is likely you will still ...


12

Not the answer you're going to like: Most computer cases are built to both maximize airflow and direct the heat transfer away from the intakes. Pulling cool air in from the front and side then blowing hot air out the back has been fairly standard for decades. The problem with pulling cool air and blowing out hot air from the same side (the front) is that it ...


11

It's fairly safe to say that there is a hardware fault when MemTest86 fails. RAM is the most likely culprit, but there are a few other things that it could be in rare circumstances. I'll list them in decreasing likelihood: RAM - Yes, the RAM could just be bad. This is the answer at least 95% of the time. Power Supply - RAM operation is fairly sensitive to ...


11

Lifehacker has a set of night classes that cover most of the topics in question. This is from my own experiences, and memory, however and may differ from that. Toolswise, get a good, comfy medium sized cross head screwdriver - I tend to favour one i got from ikea with a rubber handle. You will use this a LOT (unless you have a tool-less case) so get a comfy ...


11

If data loss is your concern, please remember that RAID is not backup. I suggest you invest in some form of backup, whether it's a 'cloud' solution or a simple rsync job to another computer. This way, you can have your RAID 0 for performance as well.


10

I have done this. It works. If you're nervous around capacitors, be aware that they can and will store residual mains power. Practice basic safety: Unplug the psu, ground yourself against the case. Snip the wires, strip them, and use a 'decent' wire splicing method. wrapping them with electrical tape is not a good idea. Solder + heat shrink, small ...


10

Our dev team uses REALLY fast hardware... $6,000+ per Dev Machine as of January 2010. The BIGGEST difference any one component made for us (we tested one thing at a time) was adding really fast I/O and putting all of our source code on that hardware. We went through about 10 different configurations (Various RAIDs with VRaptors, SSDs, Etc...) and the best ...


10

It is usually easiest to install the motherboard first (already having installed the processor and fan) and if there are any of those little white protectors that fit between the case and the board, install them. Connect the power cables. After that, I install things like the drives, optical and hard drives. Then install any PCI(x) cards. Then install the ...


9

Assuming you have all of the appropriate components and have taken the appropriate precautions to avoid static discharge, I think it is very important to install the CPU/heatsink and memory on the motherboard PRIOR to mounting the motherboard in the case. This gives you some freedom to operate, particularly on heatsinks which can be sort of a pain when ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible