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62

Yes, it should be safe. Just be sure to put your motherboard on something not conductive, like cardboard box, and it should not touch anything that conducts electricity, including your main computer case. I did this few times. If you stop by in almost any computer shop, technicians do this sort of thing routinely.


19

Yes, you can power on the motherboard outside of its case. Just keep some precautions, like laying a piece of cardboard underneath the board, and you're good to go. Also, human body contains static charge, so ground the static by touching a grounded appliance or wiring a ground circuit. Static charge in the human body might damage sensitive electronic ...


8

The other answers you got are correct: it's definitely doable and something that is done all the time by professional/power/enthusiast users for all sorts of purposes. What I would like to add is that, if you search online, you'll see that a lot of people will turn the motherboard ON using a screwdriver: they simply close the circuit between the 2 power ...


5

you waste your electrical shielding and get maybe some weird effect in nearby radios, or whatever transmitter - or in case you have strong senders nearby (maybe lay your nice smartphone on the motherboard) you induct some current somewhere on the motherboard, and if its an good one (means on the technological edge) there will be less room for errorcorrection ...


5

The case provides a number of benefits: physical protection. airflow management. Generally, some electronic devices on PCBs operated outside the designed casing can end up running hotter. This probably isn't an issue for short periods of use. Example of desktop PC with fan in case (at top of photo)


5

One thing to watch out for is add-in cards coming loose. On some cards, the rear connector bracket is long enough that it hangs below the bottom of the motherboard when the card is plugged in to the motherboard. This isn't a problem in a case when the motherboard is mounted on standoffs, but it can be a problem if you sit the motherboard directly on a hard ...


2

Inside a lab probably yes even if is a custom lab. IF you make a safe place to work without any cable or power interrumption . you are talking about a BIOS upgrade, not a common software fail safe after format. you can't say something is 100% safe for it, when was not been builded for it. where will you place it? on a carpet? you can burn it on the ...


2

Strictly no, in practice definitely yes: yes you can power up the motherboard outside of its case, or just forget the case altogether and harvest the power supply. You can happily run such a system with all of your components on the desk/shelf/whatever, great way to have an "extra" PC around in plain site that doesn't look like your typical PC. But to ...


2

I'd guess it would go through a suitable hole, like a notched expansion slot cover and to a sound output at the back of the PC, just like normal speakers. My case has something like this for passing through a USB port , and I've seen older motherboards with a pair of holes for passthrough. You might also be able to get a slot cover for water cooling with ...


1

This may happen if you used not enough thermal paste. The thermal paste should be fresh as much as possible. If the thermal paste it older than two years it is not recommended to apply. If it is not all-in-one CPU + Cooler in the box, then cooler should be chosen smartly to match your CPU. The cooler should be checked to be connected and moving all the time. ...


1

Keep in mind that many of the locations for screws on a motherboard are ground points. The screw grounds to the case and the power supply to the walls ground. I'm sure it will run without them grounded to the case but I'm also sure your board is safer well grounded. Ever wonder why there is copper/gold around the screw locations on the motherboard?



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