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2

About your last line "does case's reset button have to be functioned in order to reboot even from Windows?" N.B:- - the button has nothing to do with your OS's restart option. - If you have installed the OS successfully then you can definitely restart it from there(OS) Answer:- From your current situation I can say that it is pretty much a hardware ...


2

Thought 1 My two-cents on liquid cooling is that if you want a "set-it-and-forget-it" system then go with an over-sized air cooler. Even if you think that you will be cleaning off the dust often consider that fact that most liquid coolers require a fan as well and their efficiency declines with dust build-up too. In most cases the stock cooler should be ...


3

Yes. I just put together a new Xeon E3-1276 v3 (Haswell) board (like the i7-4790 with more cache and ECC memory capability). With the supplied cooler, even with no case, it overheated (100 degrees Celsius! ) after one minute running Prime95 64-bit. (NOT overclocking, BTW) Even a simple closed-loop liquid cooler essentially moves the bulky radiator outside ...


4

Honestly, as an owner of the same CPU in a similar system, I would say most definitely. Do not be fooled, the 5960X is a very fast and efficient CPU, but it's also deceptively hot because it's actually so much smaller than the 3930k I upgraded from and thus the heat is much more concentrated. And even the 3930k was very heat sensitive. I RMA'd my 3930k due ...


1

1) Unless your Hard Drive has a different interface than SATA, it's ok 2) Your PSU is ok, 650W are enough for the system you listed 3) The RAM is DDR3 just like your Motherboard, so it's ok 4) Yes, the CPU package contains a stock cooler


-1

To assume the Hdd is still in decent shape --not to old or high in read/write cycles sure could reuse it, same goes for the PSU ---You don't mention the speed of the DDR3 but if its new-ish (2011 or newer) should be fine that particular board supports the following speeds DDR3-1333 / 1600 / 1866 / 2133 / 2400 / 2800 / 2933 / 3100 So looks like you ...


3

The major reason liquid cooling is so much more common is that it has gotten much simpler, cheaper, and more reliable. It is not because new builds require the liquid cooling. That said, there are some times when it's worth the additional set-up complexity. It depends in part on the motherboard. If it is one advertised for overclocking/gaming et cetera, ...


5

For reliability, you may want to look into passively cooling the CPU with an oversized heatsink and install extra large fans in the chassis. The reason is having the CPU fan fail tends to cause a much longer downtime than replacing a chassis fan. If you run the chassis fan directly off the PSU instead of the mobo, you can even change them out without ...


39

In short, no Liquid cooling is still mainly for bragging rights. Getting those extra MHz from hardware and pushing for extra benchmark points. Will you need something aftermarket to cool your system? Absolutely. Of course keeping temperatures as low as possible is always a thing we strive for, but you have to weigh up the costs and risks to the ...


-1

I think that your combination will work, but there are several aspects you may want to consider: Your CPU is relatively old and AMD is not in the advantage at the moment. Maybe an i5 or a Xeon E1231V3 with a fitting motherboard is a better choice Your graphics card is a lot faster than your CPU. The CPU will be the limiting factor here. Only one RAM stick ...


1

There are two aspects to this question on risk. One is the probability of failure, the other is the potential harm that could result from failure or degraded performance. I'll focus on the first. Wikipedia provides some interesting statistics on computer power supplies. Life span is usually specified in mean time between failures (MTBF), where higher ...


4

HardOCP tested the Mod XStream Pro 700W and weren't too impressed, failing it because they couldn't draw 700W from it. The capacitors were of an unknown vintage to them too. If it was a better quality unit you could reuse, but I'd be inclined to not risk a whole lot of new parts with it. It might work just fine, but given it's known to be of questionable ...


1

I figured it out!! The hard drive casing can be pulled forward about an inch, and then released with pressure down and to the left. Now I have the box pulled out. NOTE: In the image above, I already removed a screw in the metal face just above the case. You see the hole in the top center of image.


0

How about a 2.5 inch hard drive instead of a 3.5 drive? Cables with 90 degree connectors would work for power and data. Vent holes along the bay could be used for mounting screws, or just cobble something up for mounting if you're inventive.


0

put it under DVD driver, you can find holder for your HDD in computer store i have the same case, or you can remove it and rotate



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