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3

Use the IF function: =IF(A1=B1, "Yes", "No")


2

Actually, yes, it can be done through conditional formatting... Sort of. Use the screenshots below to setup a conditional format that uses a custom number format for cells that are TRUE. You should be able to extrapolate the setup for False = No. It's important to note that it will only change the apparent value in the cell and not the actual value. If you ...


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Select the two columns. Go to Conditional Formatting and select Highlight Cell Rules. Select Duplicate values. When you get to the next step you can change it to unique values. I just did it and it worked for me.


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Go to the cell. Press CTRL+1 to open the Format Cell. Go to the Number Tab Under "Category", select "Custom" Where it says "Type", enter 0## #### #### This should ensure that you get your leading zero, and that the spaces are added. Excel also has a format under the "Special" category just for Phone Numbers. If you click that, then click "Custom" it ...


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For lower bound in A1 and upper bound in B1, you can use the following super long formula: ="["&TEXT(A1,"+."&IF(MOD(A1,1)=0,"0","00")&";-."&IF(MOD(A1,1)=0,"0","00"))&","&TEXT(B1,"+."&IF(MOD(B1,1)=0,"0","00")&";-."&IF(MOD(B1,1)=0,"0","00"))&"]" The key bit is the TEXT function. The format specified in the function ...


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Just use the AND() function to combine the two conditions: First, use "Formula is..." as criteria; then enter AND($A1="Value"; $B1="Value") Depending on your local settings, in that formula, you may have to replace the semicolon ; by a comma ,.


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No, but you can fake it You can fake it but it takes some setup. It will work unless you need really big shapes. Here are the steps for creating n different conditional format shapes in Excel 2010. tl;dr Use 1 extra cell and 1 text box for every condition you want. Each text box is setup to show giant text with huge outlines and shadows, all the same ...


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If you go back and edit your conditional formatting formula, just change $B$1 to $B1. When creating a conditional format, Excel uses absolute references by default. Removing the $ from in front of the one makes the row reference relative.


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=countif() will allow you to build a conditional formatting formula that lets you check to see when the count of the number of cells from the top of the column through the current column is equal to 1. For example: =COUNTIF($I$7:I7,">="&$K$7)=1 Where the cells to check are in column I starting with row 7 and the conditional value is stored in $K$7 ...



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