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790

I answer your question by asking you a different one: How do you count on your fingers to 6? You likely count up to the largest possible number with one hand, and then you move on to your second hand when you run out of fingers. Computers do the same thing, if they need to represent a value larger than a single register can hold they will use multiple ...


378

You are correct that a 32-bit integer cannot hold a value greater than 2^32-1. However, the value of this 32-bit integer and how it appears on your screen are two completely different things. The printed string "1000000000000" is not represented by a 32-bit integer in memory. To literally display the number "1000000000000" requires 13 bytes of memory. Each ...


233

TL;DR answer: GPUs have far more processor cores than CPUs, but because each GPU core runs significantly slower than a CPU core and do not have the features needed for modern operating systems, they are not appropriate for performing most of the processing in everyday computing. They are most suited to compute-intensive operations such as video processing ...


176

First and foremost, 32-bit computers can store numbers up to 232-1 in a single machine word. Machine word is the amount of data the CPU can process in a natural way (ie. operations on data of that size are implemented in hardware and are generally fastest to perform). 32-bit CPUs use words consisting of 32 bits, thus they can store numbers from 0 to 232-1 in ...


175

What makes the GPU so much faster than the CPU? The GPU is not faster than the CPU. CPU and GPU are designed with two different goals, with different trade-offs, so they have different performance characteristic. Certain tasks are faster in a CPU while other tasks are faster computed in a GPU. The CPU excels at doing complex manipulations to a small set ...


123

Summary Economics. It's cheaper and easier to design a CPU that has more cores than a higher clock speed, because: Significant increase in power usage. CPU power consumption increases rapidly as you increase the clock speed - you can double the number of cores operating at a lower speed in the thermal space it takes to increase the clock speed by 25%. ...


120

The CPU is a processor; there are others. A processor is what runs program code, so any device that has firmware (which is code) has a processor of some sort. A hard drive has its own (small) processor running firmware that implements an interface protocol (e.g. SATA or SCSI) and controls the drive's motors. Think of your hard drive as a specialized ...


114

Is the performance of a CPU affected as it ages? after a year of intensive use, the circuits degrade and fewer electrons can pass since the pathway is narrower, etc. No, Crystal oscillator the speed of a CPU is determined by a crystal oscillator - so far as I know this is an external part for most CPUs Picture from TechRepublic article ...


97

The current line of Xeons are based on the same architecture as the i7. The difference is usually that the Xeons are the cream of the crop. They run cooler and at lower voltages and are spec'd for 24/7 continuous usage. Otherwise, performance is usually identical. Xeons are able to be used in multi-socket motherboards, where i7s are not (which is why the Mac ...


86

Note: This answer is written with the assumption that the CPUs being compared consist of commercially-available Intel, AMD, and ARM-based SoCs from approximately 2006 to 2015. Any set of comparison measurements will be invalid given a wide enough scope; I wanted to provide a very specific and "tangible" answer here while also covering the two most ...


80

When a computer interprets assembly level instructions, these instructions are turned into their binary equivalents for the CPU to read. When the CPU executes the instructions, it interprets the opcode part of the instruction into individual "microprograms", containing their microcode equivalents. Just so you know, a full assembly instruction consists of ...


78

Well, HDD always had processors, mainly to cache data and do other HDD stuff like marking bad blocks etc. The Netgear product you linked is a NAS, which allows you to stream media from it over the network, so it's not really a HDD. It's more like a network connected HDD with some fancy software to allow you to stream information over the network. Old ...


68

As others have noted, you need the lm-sensors package. I thought I should mention that in addition to installing the package, you should run the sensors-detect command to identify the kernel modules that need to be loaded. If you haven't done this, manually run this once and check if it detects any sensors on board your computer. $ sudo sensors-detect # ...


65

The reason manufacturers have stopped concentrating on increasing clock speed is because we can no longer cool the processors fast enough for this to be viable. The higher the clock speed, the more heat is generated, and we've now hit a stage where it is no longer efficient to increase processor speed due to the amount of energy that goes into cooling it. ...


59

In theory, no, a CPU should run at basically the same speed its entire life. In practice, yes, CPUs get slower over time because of dust build-up on the heatsink, and because the lower-quality thermal paste that prebuilt computers are often shipped with will degrade or evaporate. These effects cause the CPU to overheat, at which point it will throttle ...


58

Do a Ctrl + Shift + Esc. This will open the Windows Task Manager. Once you are here, go to Performance. Now you should see many boxes in the CPU Usage History section which will identify how many cores you have. This will include hyper threaded cores also. -Hope this helps.


54

GPUs lack: Virtual memory (!!!) Means of addressing devices other than memory (e.g. keyboards, printers, secondary storage, etc) Interrupts You need these to be able to implement anything like a modern operating system. They are also (relatively) slow at double precision arithmetic (when compared with their single precision arithmetic performance)*, and ...


52

This is the standard "saran-wrap-in-place-of-condom" question. While some toothpastes may provide the correct type of thermal conductivity, "toothpaste" is too big a category to answer the question accurately. Worse, unless you want to make it a fun science project, nobody is going to be testing different types of toothpastes for thermal conductivity. That ...


49

The first thing, remember that Moore's Law isn't a law, it's just an observation. And it doesn't have to do with speed, not directly anyway. Originally it was just an observation that component density pretty much doubles around every [time period], that's it, nothing to do with speed. As a side effect, it effectively made things both faster (more things ...


48

The simple answer is that not all threads are executing simultaneously. For a fuller explanation, read on. The operating system's task scheduler is generally thought of to schedule applications, and doing so allows you to perform one task while the computer is working on another. In the old days, the litmus test of multitasking was formatting a floppy disk ...


47

The reason is hyperthreading, which your processor supports. Hyperthreading isnt the equivalent of an extra processor, but can really boost performance on multithreaded applications. For each processor core that is physically present, the operating system addresses two virtual processors, and shares the workload between them when possible.


47

You don't need other programs. Just run this in the command prompt: WMIC CPU Get DeviceID,NumberOfCores,NumberOfLogicalProcessors and you will get a list of Cores/Logical Processors for each CPU on your machine Or if you're lazy, just type WMIC CPU Get /Format:List and look for entries with the names NumberOfCores and NumberOfLogicalProcessors.


46

What you are seeing is a feature of your CPU called Hyper-Threading, which appears as additional logical processors to the OS. From Intel's Ark page about that CPU: Cores - 2 Threads - 4 Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology - Yes From there as well: Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology (Intel® HT Technology) delivers two processing threads per ...


45

Technically x86 simply refers to a family of processors and the instruction set they all use. It doesn't actually say anything specific about data sizes. x86 started out as a 16-bit instruction set for 16-bit processors (the 8086 and 8088 processors), then was extended to a 32-bit instruction set for 32-bit processors (80386 and 80486), and now has been ...


45

Actually this information is given to OS by the BIOS, but you will need an application to expose the information. You can find a lot of applications to do this, Google found these: Realtemp. CPU thermomether. Core temp.


39

Your primary problem is software not written for multi-core. Look at Jeff Atwood's excellent article on Choosing Dual core or Quad Core. for most software, you hit a point of diminishing returns very rapidly after two cores. In Quad-Core Desktops and Diminishing Returns, I questioned how effectively today's software can really use even four CPU cores, ...


38

Moore's law describes a long-term trend in the history of computing hardware. The number of transistors that can be placed inexpensively on an integrated circuit has doubled approximately every two years. It's not about clock speed. Also, a CPU's clock speed is not a reliable indicator of its processing power.


38

As mentioned you have a dual-core system, with 2 threads per core. This is marketed by Intel as hyperthreading and has been done in various ways over the years by various different manufacturers. To explain it in its simplest form each CPU core consists of a "core" and various architecture around that core that keeps state and process information for each ...


37

As long as you keep the machine dry, there shouldn't be any real problems from running a PC in the cold. Where you will run into problems is if condensation is allowed to form on the components. I have installed computers into blast chillers and refrigeration factories without problems, but we did need to make sure the cases were put into enclosures that ...


36

You are also able to write "THIS STATEMENT IS FALSE" without your computer crashing :) @Scott's answer is spot-on for certain calculation frameworks, but your question of "writing" a large number implies that it's just plain text, at least until it's interpreted. Edit: now with less sarcasm more useful information on different ways a number can be stored in ...



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