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0

Your thermal paste may have become old and hard... try taking off the heat sink, removing the remnants of thermal paste and applying new thermal paste.


2

In short, NO. Overclocking your chipset will not get you a significant improvement in graphics while playing games. It probably won't even get you a noticeable improvement in graphics. You might get an extra 1-2 fps if you lucky.


3

Yes. A processor is a physical object, which uses an architecture to do the processing work x86 is an Intel architecture. i5 is a line (actually several lines in the core microarchitecture since Nehalem to currently Haswell) of processors in the x86 architecture There's nothing called "OS bit" or "x86 bit". The "bitness" is of the underlying architecture ...


0

There is a tool which is called nvidia-smi. It comes with the nVidia CUDA drivers. It tells you which PID is using the GPU: [root@localhost release]# nvidia-smi Wed Sep 26 23:16:16 2012 +------------------------------------------------------+ | NVIDIA-SMI 3.295.41 Driver Version: 295.41 | ...


0

You can refer to this answer for a couple of steps to troubleshoot interfering or unwanted applications (answer here): Although this may be overkill, I'd not say that there's some malware that specifically prevents you to do that, but maybe an app that interfers with the expected behaviour: Run a check using anti-malware tools, like ...


0

For disk usage, it's normal, Antimalware Service Executable sometimes checks some files on hdd, so for what regards disk usage, don't worry. For cpu usage, check with another operating system as drk.com.ar suggested.


0

As an addition to the other's answer, you can look inside the BIOS/UEFI for the CPU speeds. In UEFI it's on the default page (simplified page), at the top right corner. "Speed: 3100MHz". Can't directly show pictures, as I do not have the reputation for it, so here's the link: http://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/ASUS-EFI-01.jpg


0

This tool called TMonitor or PerfMonitor 2may helpful to you!


2

This sort of information is not stored unfortunately, so you will be unable to retrieve this data. Assuming your PC was new when you bought it - then unless you overclocked it yourself, it was never overclocked. If the PC is second hand (you aren't the first owner) then the only way to know if it was ever overclocked would be to ask the previous owner. ...


0

So I went ahead and tried re-seating the heat sinks and it didn't make a significant difference. I don't know what else I can try to get it running as cool as it did when I first bought it, or if it's even possible. It seems like there is only a single fan in the laptop, so unless I pulled out the motherboard and found a dust build up or something, I can't ...


1

Intel couldn't trademark 80486, because you can't trademark a number. Intel had been using numbers for sometime, 4004, 8008, 8080, 8086, 8088, 80186, 80286, 80386 and 80486. However a combination of numbers and letters can be trademarked. Other companies were selling processors using 80486 and 486 nomenclature and Intel wanted to differentiate theirs hence ...


0

You state "computer" and not laptop, I believe anyone would assume this to be a desktop or tower PC. This is important because you may have some issues if you were to tote a portable item from a cool environment to a humid one. That being said, a PC that resides in an environment will have that environments ambient temp and relative humidity when it is not ...


0

Around 25°C is a perfectly safe temperature for your computer to run at. Since the computer runs at a warmer temperature that the surrounding environment it is unlikely to attract condensation. If humidity is a concern: Try to avoid leaving the computer turned off for long periods at a time Make sure the case is closed. You could look into a ...


0

There's no such thing as too cold when it comes to electronics. Humidity (the amount of water in the air) can be a problem though. But note that if you have your computer case closed, cold alone will not cause condensation to appear. Condensation will only appear if the water in the air gets in a hot/cold situation. But with the case closed, there shouldn't ...


0

The processor is not replaceable. The Intel Celeron N2815 processor installed on this system uses a BGA 1170 package. BGA processors are permanently soldered onto the motherboard and cannot be replaced by the user. Edit: The Intel Celeron 1007U uses BGA 1023 so it is not replaceable either.


0

You need to set the VBoxInternal/CPUM/HostCPUID extradata of the virtual machine. This will make VirtualBox report a different CPUID to the guest. For example to set the model name to Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU 6600 @ 2.40 GHz1, run the following vboxmanage commands: set vm=your-vm-name-or-uuid vboxmanage setextradata %vm% ...


2

Many CPU fans already have thermal paste on their lower surface. You should clean the surfaces on both and apply the paste again. If you use the existing paste, it can happen that it is not well distributed. You can clean it with 99% isopropyl alcohol and a cloth.


2

Many times the CPU will ship with a thermal pad. Once installed, and then removed (The bond of the paste broken) then you must clean and reapply. The pads and pastes work by eliminating air between the CPU and Heatsink (air being a relatively poor conductor). Attempting to reuse the pad will increase the air, thus reducing cooling.


4

If you look at http://www.cpubenchmark.net/power_performance.html, you'll see a nice power/performance chart. The i7-4700MQ has a maximum TDP of 47W, while the i7-4500u (and i7-4600u) only have a TDP of 15W. It is a major difference that you will notice in battery life. The internal GPU for the MQ is better, but that will mostly matter if you're into ...


1

The manufacturer of your motherboard - Elitegroup Computer Systems - mentions these specifications: CPU LGA775 socket for latest Intel® Core 2 Quad(95W) / Core 2 Duo / Pentium Dual-Core (E21XX) / Celeron 4XX series processor Supports Intel 45nm Core 2 Quad(Yorkfield) and Core2 Duo(Wolfdale) series processors. (please refer to the CPU support ...


31

Short answer: yes, there is a difference. They're all part of the x86 lineup though, and post i486 they were a marketing name for Intel chips. In the early days of computing, IBM wanted multiple sources for their chips. Intel allowed AMD to make some 386 chips. When the 486 came out, clones were big enough that Intel didn't need worry about IBM as much, and ...


2

As you can see here it's on there list for 7 years. Electrolysis is available in the nightly version for half a year now, and that seem like the only possibility at the moment.


0

When BIOS autodetects your CPU the frequencies and scales/multipliers are always set proper, as default. When you overclocks it your run it at own risk. Generally, it can work , but it can be critical as well. Data corruption may happen at some certain modes of CPU when it changes internal clock modes. Remember, the certain model of CPU has been tested at ...


2

Yes, get some thermal paste like artic silver 5. Some of this http://www.arcticsilver.com/arcticlean.htm Also some compressed air cans. As artic sliver is not an adhesive product do not remove heatsinks that are held on this way. You want to focus on the CPU and GPU. Once the heatsink/fan is removed from the CPU you should use cleaner to remove the old ...


1

If money is not an impediment, go for the best one, the #3. You'll have a powerful rig plus it'll work great for some years to come without any upgrade. Just give the proper maintenance and it'll be good. Maintenance is obligatory on all computers, don't forget that. But, if you want to save some cash, your best bet would be the #1. However, either chipset ...


0

I often see negative figures with speedfan as well and I'm not convinced this is a hardware problem, more likely a software problem. I am using the hardware monitor from cpuid.com now (http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html) and don't see those negatives anymore. That being said, you do have a serious cooling problem and at those temperatures, you ...


0

A 1 GHz Processor is capable of executing 1 billion instructions every second (Ignoring Hyperthreading Pipelining multicore and other cpu features to allow multiple instructions to be executed at once. The instruction to increment your counter is only 1 instruction, depending on how your check for 100 million and how gcc optimizes it the check could get ...


3

It would depend largly on your definition of fast. A 3Ghz processor has three billion cycles per second. The amount of instructions that can be carried out per cycle is dependent on many things, include the instruction set, cores, architecture, and what task is being carried out. Processors are designed and optimised to do as much as possible during a ...


0

To put it plain and simple, CPUs don't age. They keep performing at the same speed and same stability unless something damages the CPU. In most cases this heat. Liquid or environments that are too humid can cause shorts that will cause local overheating as well and damage its components. As with all matter in the universe, there's always some degree of ...


0

The System bus connects the CPU to the RAM, and operates at the same speeds the RAM does. This is why your CPU, Motherboard, and RAM all match in capacity (speed). Do not confuse this with clock speed however. You CPU and Motherboard should both indicate the speeds of ram they will support. buy ram at one of these supported speeds (even better, consult ...


0

They measure different things, like in a car you have RPM for an engine and your tires have a different RPM because there are gears in between. CPU cycles are used to perform math, ram cycles are used to input and retrieve data and motherboard cycles move data around. This is an oversimplified example, there are other things happening as well.


0

You will generally not notice a distinct difference from faster ram. Faster ram does mean every operation is a little faster, but it does not directly address a bottleneck except for a small class of applications that maintain millions of small objects which are each accessed every cycle. The only app I can think of that meets this definition is Dwarf ...


0

Of course, it depends on what you're doing, but yes, there are diminishing returns. Simple, everyday applications such as word processing or Web browsing benefit little from having more than two processor cores. Scientific computing and gaming applications tend to make better use of four (or more) cores and/or hyperthreading capability as they tend to be ...


1

I use a vaccume cleaner hose and pump hoses , or any tube even a paper towel tube , that is non conductive. put one end as best as one can to ear, and the other end you aim and point it at things until you locate the area where it seems the sound is loudest. Another probably better method use a microphone like a lapel mic , and pass it through some ...


2

Sometimes sounds, especially higher frequency or in tight spaces (and oddly shaped spaces) can be hard to locate. Check your power supply fan, maybe it's dirty or one of the bearings are failing. That would be a first guess. Also check any case fans you have installed. You could try unplugging them one at a time when the noise is happening to see if it ...


-2

A logical CPU is usually used to describe the grand total of CPUs on the chip. the 8 cores are physical cores that exist on the chip. So each CPU can address to processes at once giving you 16 logical processors. The hyper-threading allows a core to complete two tasks at once. So as you have 4 cores each hyper-threading you will have a total of 16 logical ...


3

Number of cores (8) represents the actual number of physical cores. For each processor core that is physically present, the operating system addresses two virtual or logical cores, and shares the workload between them when possible. Where multiprocessing systems include multiple complete processing units, multithreading aims to increase utilization of a ...


12

Hyper-threading will make one physical core appear to the OS as two. Hyper-threading essentially allows one core to execute two sets of instructions at once, depending on the nature of the instructions. When it was first introduced (back in 2002, and it was quite the buzz at the time, with overclockers and then-new bloggers going crazy debating HT vs. true ...


1

It's not the CPU (at-least not for older PCs) that influences the selection of RAM on a machine, it's more related to what Motherboard you have. For example Consider, two CPUs Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 519K Intel® Core™ i7-4790K Processor If you go through the specifications you will find that the older CPU has no Memory Specifications while the newer ...


1

Yes the CPU now has a built in controller and talks to the memory more directally than it did before, which becomes a bit more important/critical that the tiny wires in the cpu socket are all connecting proper (one build concideration). I just mention that because rarely a really bad ram problem was a CPU connecting to the socket problem, something that was ...


1

The only time you should "renew" your thermal paste is if your original paste has been removed or damaged (e.g. if you take off a fan for cleaning). Once thermal paste is applied, it stays and doesn't go bad. If you notice that your temperatures go up, it's more likely that your air vents are blocked, that your fan isn't working properly. Try to clean it ...


0

The forum has answered the majority of what i was going to say my only comment left is Don't replace the Stock Thermal Compound if it has Thermal Compound Leave it there Also, if your asking the question, it therefore proves that you don't have the experience to replace Thermal Compound, and incidentally, if your freind tells you "just do it.it's easy" ...


-1

In the top version from procps-3.2.7, you type f, followed by j to let top show the 'P' column.


0

The processor FSB can't have a higher frequency than motherboard's FSB. You should check for a BIOS update to see if your motherboard supports that FSB frequency. If that's not possible, you'll have to "underclock" your processor. Read more about FSB on Wikipedia.


1

GPU and CPU fans can run faster on high load. New BIOSes have such functions (e.g. Smart Fan Control) which increase fan RPM when CPU/GPU gets hot, and decrease RPM when it gets cold. So there is nothing strange if your fans run faster. If you think your game can't do it, probably you've got malware with BitCoin miner. Scan you computer for viruses. If ...


2

Arbitrary precision is possible in scientific computing. You just pay for it in additional processing. It is the responsibility of the the scientist to be aware of computational limitations in their calculations and to test for them. For example, small changes in input parameters should produce correspondingly small changes in the output. Arbitrary ...


5

CPU thermal instability may arise in the inner core (which is designed to work at higher temperatures than, say, the L2 cache) or in the outer CPU. If the CPU was a thermal superconductor it would be all at the same temperature and this would not matter. Normally heat is removed from the whole surface covered by the heatsink, and is generated mostly in the ...


0

OS X has supported a thread affinity API since version 10.5. Here is some relevant material from the webpage I linked to. Affinity Set An affinity set is a collection of threads which share memory resources and wish to share an L2 cache. Distinct affinity sets represent separate affinities—that is, threads belonging to a different set should use a ...


0

There are a lot of programs that start working when your computer is going idle, when your power-management kicks in... A few ideas are Boinc (e.g. seti@home), file indexer, anti-malware, ... most of these things won't be recognised by your AV software but can cause tremendous stress on your computer. Use some process monitoring software that stays in the ...


1

Some softwares that utilize your computer's idle time (mostly I've seen Anti-Viruses scans your computer when idle). Try shutting down your AV and monitor it with Sysinternals Process Explorer. Once this utility is up, leave your computer until you hear your fan run faster, then check the CPU graph (by putting the mouse on it) to see who used the most CPU. ...



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