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8

for that, you sure need to create a batch file. maybe follwing link will help you on this This is the similar post. Try it out. The script cmdkey.exe /list > "%TEMP%\List.txt" findstr.exe Target "%TEMP%\List.txt" > "%TEMP%\tokensonly.txt" FOR /F "tokens=1,2 delims= " %%G IN (%TEMP%\tokensonly.txt) DO cmdkey.exe /delete:%%H del "%TEMP%\*.*" /s /f /q ...


6

Although it turned out to be irrelevant to your situation, for the benefit of future searchers, the answer to the actual question "Manage another user's credentials for network access" is: runas /user:serviceaccountname "%windir%\system32\cmdkey.exe /add:server.domain.com /user:username /pass:password" This will create a credential in serviceaccountname's ...


5

Perhaps it's worth trying Network Password Decryptor? It can apparently decrypt the passwords stored in the vault. I've not used it myself though. [Edit] If that doesn't work there is another program that does a similar thing: Network Password Recovery v1.31 (just make sure you are logged in as an administrator and run it as an administrator) [/Edit]


3

For completeness, you can manage credentials at the command line or in batch script with cmdkey.exe (located in %windir%\system32). For example, to add (or update) the credentials on server.domain.tld: cmdkey.exe /add:server.domain.tld /user:username /pass:password or for the entire domain: cmdkey.exe /add:*.domain.tld /user:username /pass:password ...


3

I use the KeePass AutoType feature to log in to various RDP sessions in the network. On the Auto-Type tab I add a custom sequence for a specific window. To add the entry I use the default sequence but add {DOWN} to the beginning of it. This means that it doesn't matter what username is currently displayed in the security details as the {DOWN} sequence ...


2

If you can access the remote computer, you could add your service account to the local Users group and match the username/password to what you would use. Don't forget to give it administrative privileges. Then goto the remote login tab in the system menu, and add that user as someone who is allowed to remotely login. This is what I do when I need to hit ...


2

I would first suggest extensive checks by several well-known anti-virus products. Two solutions that might work: Uninstall all Windows Live applications and delete this generic credential. To keep Windows Live applications but still get rid of this license, you will need to delete it every day, either manually or programmatically: Create a Windows batch ...


2

Sure, but it depends on how many 'targetnames' you have. cmdkey /delete:Administrator && cmdkey /delete:Knuckle-Dragger


1

Generic Credentials are for third-party applications that manage authorization separate from the credentials of the currently logged-on user. Almost any credentials that adhere to the Microsoft standard can be stored in the Generic Credentials category. For more information see the article Manage network logon credentials in Microsoft Windows. However, the ...


1

No, this isn't the case. What I suspect might be wrong is that you still have previous credentials stored. Try removing the stored credentials from Credential Manager, and then connect and log on to the domain (this will re-cache your credentials). Afterward there shouldn't be any problems. Note: There are also methods that your sysadmin could be using to ...



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