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28

If you're concerned about privacy, I'm not so sure about the benefits of turning to Google over Skype/Microsoft. Probably a better alternative would be using a SIP client. SIP SIP is a distributed and fully open VoIP and video and presence/chat spec "distinguished by its proponents for having roots in the IP community rather than the telecommunications ...


26

As Breakthrough said, use NTFS. In both Mac OS and Linux, you can use NTFS-3G to enable read/write to an NTFS partition; on Mac OS you also need MacFuse, but that's it. These projects are free, open-source and mature. I've used this setup on a Mac and I've had no problems accessing data from an NTFS partition.


22

You are asking the wrong question. A folder is simply a logical construct on a filesystem. A more appropriate question to ask is what filesystem/storage mechanism (which allows folders). There are probably lots of answers to this question - they will all involve encryption. A good, free, cross-platform answer is "Truecrypt". Truecrypt will allow you to ...


21

TrueCrypt is cross platform. TrueCrypt currently supports the following operating systems: Windows 7 Windows 7 64-bit Windows Vista Windows Vista 64-bit Windows XP Windows XP 64-bit Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2008 64-bit Windows Server 2003 Windows Server 2003 64-bit Windows 2000 SP4 Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard ...


16

I assume you're switching due to today's business deal between Skype and Microsoft. You aren't alone! An easy one to acquire now is Google Talk. It's quite similar to Skype, with full video calling and chat. Living in the USA, Canada, and some other countries, you can even make calls for free; there is a browser plugin directly from Gmail that will do that. ...


15

You don't need Wine. There's a native Linux build of Google Chrome available @ http://dev.chromium.org/getting-involved/dev-channel#TOC-Linux [Debian package only, for the time being ]


14

UDF is a candidate. It works out-of-the-box on linux >= 2.6.31, Windows >= Vista, MacOS >= 9 and on many BSDs. Note: UDF comes in different versions, which are not equally supported on all platforms, see Wikipedia - Compatibility. Related question: Using UDF on a USB flash drive


14

The simple answer is- no. There is no lowest common denominator across these OSes aside from FAT32. By lowest common denominator, I mean built-in filesystems. For add-ons, you're on your own.


14

Syncany is another service to look for. It is still in beta, but looks very promising. Syncany is an open-source cloud storage and filesharing application. It allows users to backup and share certain folders of their workstations using any kind of storage, e.g. FTP, Amazon S3 or Google Storage.


14

From the Vim wiki: au GUIEnter * simalt ~x That'll work on Windows; I'm not sure what key combinations you'd need on Gnome/KDE.


13

SparkleShare is very similar to DropBox on the client side, but it uses Git on the server/protocol side. You can configure it to use your own Git server on your machine at home. It is cross-platform (even Android), but the Windows client is a bit rough and difficult to install for the average Windows user. They are looking for volunteers to make it user ...


13

http://xmpp.org/ aka jabber


12

iFolder is very similar to Dropbox, it uses rsync to replicate data from each client to a server. You have to supply the server. Haven't touched it in many years. It used to have issues synchronizing the deltas of certain file types. I think some MS Office files were so completely rewritten during each save that it ended up resending the entire file. ...


10

It is possible to use NTFS with all three operating systems. NTFS has a maximum file size of 16TB. There are drivers made for Linux and Mac that can allow you to read and write to an NTFS file system. If you need help finding these drivers they are discussed in this link.


10

Dropbox would be my first pick. Free too. I've had very good results using this as a sort of portable storage from home to work to other places.


10

Apparently, it's because Linux users want it that way: The reason Linux isn’t shown above is that all of the feedback we’ve received so far indicates that Linux users would be happier with a theme that uses native GTK icons in the navigation toolbar, which rules out this type of customized visual treatment.


8

Well you have two solutions. Many Linux distributions include tools for reading and writing to NTFS drives... An alternative would be to use Ext2. There is a windows utility which integrates the filesystem with the Windows operating system. I think this would be your ideal solution: It installs a pure kernel mode file system driver Ext2fs.sys, which ...


8

Linux: ~/.macromedia/Flash_Player/ Windows: %AppData%\Macromedia\Flash Player\ Mac OS X: ~/Library/Preferences/Macromedia/Flash Player/ Plugin behavior, and therefore Flash LSO location, is browser-independent most of the time. Also see Local Shared Objects on Wikipedia.


7

LAN only doesn't meet your requirements - but others might be interested: Simidude. I'm trying it out now and it seems to cut the mustard. It is paid software, but offers a free trial. Simidude is a cross platform network clipboard that makes it easy to transfer text, images, files or folders from one computer to another.


7

There are a few different options. I would recommend MacPorts. There's also Fink, pkgsrc, homebrew.


7

Look at this chart on Wikipedia and scroll down to the last table for "Supporting operating systems." This lists OS support by file system. As you can see, there is no file system that is covers all OS platforms, the closest being FAT16. FAT32 is a close 2nd, requiring 3rd party driver support for z/OS. Since you require read/write support and large ...


6

In Unix, the new line character is \n and whereas in Windows it is \r\n. \r or ^M is the carriage-return character. If the file is written in an editor in windows mode, each new line character will have a carriage return character along. If you tell your editor (and if it understands) to treat the new line characters as in windows, you would not see the ^M ...


6

I recommend Teamviewer, since it's free (for non-commercial usage) and let's you email custom invitations Some interesting features Works behind firewalls The major difficulties in using remote control software are firewalls and blocked ports, as well as NAT routing for local IP addresses. If you use TeamViewer you don't have to worry ...


6

Mount your external drives to a server with NFS and Samba.


6

I don't know why people always recommend dropbox or sugarsync when teamdrive is actually way better, it offers: Encryption before you upload your files! You are able to host the stuff on your own server Go management tools I think that is what you actually are looking for.


5

rsync It is already there or easily installed on any UNIX like system (including Mac OS X). For windows DeltaCopy is a nice GUIfied implementation of rsync.


5

Yes there is. Samba or smb for short is the native file and printer sharing protocol on Windows and you can install a samba client and/or a samba server on a Linux system or Mac. Here you can find info for Mac's. Setting up Samba on Linux will vary based on distribution. Here is one. Some windows 7 and XP details here. The wikipedia article is also ...


5

...as general as the question is: http://live.gnome.org/Dia a GTK+ based diagram creation program for GNU/Linux, Unix and Windows released under the GPL license.


5

Download Android SDK from http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html Unzip Android SDK and move it to ~/.android On a terminal, type ~/.android/tools/android update sdk Install Android SDK Platform Tools, and an SDK Platform Android of your choice. On the Virtual Devices tab, create a new AVD. I called mine "AndroidSandbox", API Level 10, with a 2GB SD ...


5

Have you tried: Windows Live Mesh Windows Live Sync Both are free, but require a Windows Live ID. Windows AND Mac. Update: corrected Windows only to Windows AND Mac.



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