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17

Almost all recent network cards support auto-crossover (Auto-MDIX). With this feature, whether a cable is normal or crossover doesn't matter - you can connect two computers using a normal cable, so although I have not tested it I'm sure it would also allow connecting such a card to a router using a crossover cable. If this feature is not supported by your ...


13

Most modern NIC's don't need cross-over cables, since they use auto sensing to find out which cable you plugged in. So use a cross-over or a normal cat5 or cat6 cable, either way you should be good.


10

Wikipedia has pinouts for a gigabit crossover cable. Note that while Auto-MDIX is an optional feature of the gigabit ethernet specification (IEEE 802.3-2008: "Implementation of an automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration is optional for 1000BASE-T devices"), most gigabit ethernet interfaces do implement it, so in most cases you will not need a special crossover ...


9

Auto-MDIX is a function of the NIC. It's a required part of gigabit, so you're guaranteed to have it there. If 10/100, you may or may not have it depending on the vendor. Note that gigabit technically requires cat5e or better. Regular cat5 doesn't meet specs (but will typically work anyways if the run is short enough).


9

Look at the ends of the cable. If the color order is identical, then it is a patch cable (or as you said "conventional"). If the color orders are different, then it is a crossover. Also, keep in mind that USUALLY (not all the time) crossover cables are red. Obviously they can come in any color though. Below you can see the colors of the twisted pair wires ...


5

You don't: Auto MDI-X is built into the Gigabit Ethernet spec. The endpoints will auto-negotiate and take care of those communication issues.


5

Having both machines connected to the same router makes them connected to each other .. you do not need to connect them with a cable.. To connect to your windows machine from your laptop you have to: a. On windows: Start -> Run -> type cmd and press the Enter key (this will open a command prompt window) in cmd window type 'ipconfig' (without quotes) and ...


4

As sm11963 says, you can setup your computer B. But you need to understand some network routing basics. And this is overkill for only one port. Else, just use port forwarding. For Linux this is done with iptables. For Windows this is done with a port forwarding software. Google will give you some. I use this one: http://www.quantumg.net/portforward.php (I ...


4

what type of cable should I use All ports on the TP Link TL-SF1008D support Auto-MDIX, so you can use any straight-through or crossover 8P8C terminated (RJ45) Cat 5/5E/6 twisted-pair Ethernet cable. if I am using the 2 pair cable (instead of 4) between the switch and the router I am able to connect to the internet but same is not true in case of 4 ...


4

Your crossover cable scenario is how ICS should work. You'll just have to make sure you don't manually assign an IP address to the LAN connection on your Windows machine and let ICS do that for you, i.e. you should enable ICS on your Wireless connection and select the Wired/LAN connection as the destination and the latter's IP address should be changed for ...


4

Wikipedia says Owing to the inclusion of Auto-MDIX capability, modern implementations of the Ethernet over twisted pair standards usually no longer require the use of crossover cables. Which implies that a crossover Ethernet cable can be used in place of a straight-through Ethernet cable with recent equipment. Older Ethernet hubs and switches ...


3

The other answers explain current solutions but I kinda felt like going into the original problem cause It allows me to reminisce on my time in the army as a cable dog.....sigh..... The original problem simplified Think about it like this. For your two pcs (or any alike devices really) your nic has a set of predefined "standard" dedicated directions for ...


3

Most modern Ethernet equipment will auto-negotiate and doesn't care whether the cable is cross-over or not.


3

Don't worry, most modern Ethernet cards support both modes and will automatically recognize type of the cable.


3

Yes, Auto MDI-X (invented and promoted to IEEE in 1998 by HP) is an optional part of the 802.3AB 1000BASE-T specification, that has been widely implemented. So, you may run into a 1000BASE-T NIC without it, but I doubt it highly in this day and age. Keep in mind 1000BASE-T is not the only type of Gb networking, just the most common.


3

I can confirm that the "Microsoft Network Client v.3.0 for MS-DOS" on MS-DOS 6.22 can connect to a Windows 7 machine. I dusted off an old 486-machine with this client still on the harddrive. I also got a error 53 trying to connect to a Windows 7 machine. (Even NET VIEW \\MACHINE_NAME gave the error 53. I needed to adjust the LMHOSTS to include the ...


2

You did everything correctly, however you will not be able to see the DOS machine as an object on the network. Since it does not have Windows and its subsequent applications, its just a machine with an IP address. In order to get them talking, you need SMB on DOS, which MS has here. I havent used this, so I dont know if/how well it works. But, I dont see ...


2

Assign a static IP address to the network cards (10.0.0.1 and 10.0.0.2). Then put them in the same subnet (subnetmask 255.255.255.251). That should about do it. NOTE: This assumes you aren't using a 10.0.0.0 network for your WiFi connections. For more info (and pretty pictures) go here. Just so you know, those crazy IP addresses are referred to as self ...


2

That would depend on a lot of things. Routers are generally made to use "normal" cables to connect to computers as they are wired to work that way. Most modern devices and network cards can use a normal cable as a cross-over cable or a normal cable. Unless all your devices are pre-1998 you should be able to use a cross-over cable with a router. Wikipedia ...


2

The thing that defines whether a network interface is internet connected or not is its default gateway. The best approach from what I can gather from the description is to use a different IP network for the wired network, separate from what you use for normal network access. So lets say your router or dhcp server is handing out addresses in the 10.1.1.0/24 ...


1

Scenario 1 You have cat5e or Cat 6 cables. (Straight through (ST) or Cross Over (CO) Your switch is a gigabit switch that has the auto sensing Auto MDX standard. Your NIC card is a Gigabit NIC that has the MDX standard as well. CO or ST cables do not matter in most cases since the MDX feature will auto correct the connection. Scenario 2 Same as above but ...


1

Okay, if you followed the steps in that links (i.e. you set a static IP address on both computers and used a crossover cable), then you may also want to try setting the Ethernet speed rather than letting it Auto-negotiate (or Auto detect) - I've found that PCs often do not like this configuration in a Crossover (PC-to-PC) configuration. To do this, go into ...


1

By doing this, all that will happen is that file transfers from machine to machine will run a lot faster, however, if you only do the occasional transfer/print etc, there is very little reason to actually do this. FYI - edit to be clearer. If Wired is 100Mb and Wireless is 54Mb, you will be going at the wired 100Mb speed, not combined at 154Mb, it is not ...


1

A bridged connection is the better solution. If you set up the bridge properly, and set your Ubuntu computer to automatically get an IP address from DHCP, it should work. Connection bridging in Windows usually forward DHCP requests to the router the Windows computer is attached to, and so the bridged computer appears to the router as if it were its own ...


1

The problem was something else entirely. While experimenting with the other Intel NIC, I had set Speed to 1.0 Gbps instead of Autonegotiation. This resulted in it not being able to connect to the router which is 10/100. It appears that my router does actually support crossover-detection. Thanks.


1

If attaching the drive internally as Hennes suggested isn't a viable option for you, the best option is using a wired gigabit ethernet connection and using Windows file sharing between the two. If one or both of your machines have gigabit ethernet, you don't need a special crossover cable, as gigabit includes auto-negotiation, any standard Cat5/5e/6 cable ...



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