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7

Your router is showing you the "number of dynamic DHCP clients". You have configured your computer to not be a dynamic DHCP client, so it is not showing in the list. If you want a "static" IP address, you should find a way onto the "DHCP reservations list". This is usually done by giving the router the MAC address of your computer's network interface and ...


5

There should be nvram (i.e. non-volatile ram). nvram show # list all variables nvram get name # get variable nvram set name=value # set variable nvram unset name # delete variable nvram commit # save changes to flash


5

The bandwidth specs on your router's spec sheet are in Megabits Per Second. One byte contains eight bits. To calculate the number of Megabytes Per Second, the unit of measure you are reporting, simply divide the Megabits Per Second spec by 8. Your router only has 100Mbps ports. 100Mbps is roughly 12.5MB/s. 11MB/s of throughput (what you are getting) is very ...


5

I managed to crack the password, I'll post the answer as a future reference to future users if you don't mind. Use Telnet (enable it if you're on windows) and connect your laptop to the router using a cable. Open a terminal or command prompt and type telnet 192.168.1.1 or whatever your local IP is. my username and password are user and user they are ...


5

First and the highest limit is the range of addresses the subnet has. Most home routers are limited to a class C address which gives 254 addresses, one of which is used by the router itself, which gives 253 clients. However you are far more likely to run into limits based on either the amount of bandwidth available or the devices NAT table. The bandwidth ...


5

This is probably down to your subnet being /24 or 255.255.255.0, basically this means that 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.1.1 are effectively on two separate networks. When you use two devices (especially consumer gear) it can cause a lot of trouble. From what I have gathered, the ISP supplied modem is actually a router as it provides a private IP address and does ...


4

I can find no reference in the manual or specifications that is supports an MTU of over 1500. In fact, the inside side of that router doesn't seem to have any MTU settings at all. Only the ISP facing side has those settings and there is no indication that it supports large values. That device most probably does not support jumbo frames.


4

If you've already updated your firmware and there was no improvement, you might want to either return it, or, if it's already out of warranty/return period, check the in browser administration page. There should be a button to reset the router. If pressing that button fixes the problem by resetting the router, then you'll have a way to automate it. I've had ...


4

Check the ventilation around the router: make sure it is getting enough air circulation to not overheat. Many network devices operate on the edge of their thermal limits and all it takes is a bit of dust, being covered by papers, or being shoved under a shelf to push them over the edge. Poor behavior after running for a few days (or even just a few hours), ...


4

The subnet mask shows the break point for the network side and the host side of a subnet so 255.255.255.0 for a 192.168.0.0 subnet would allow a range of 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.254. Changing the subnet to 255.255.0.0 will allow a range of 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.255.254. in ether case 192.168.0.1 is a usable address for a host in the subnet. I hope this ...


3

You can deauth it, kick it off, but you cannot force the users OS to forget the saved password (atleast not if you only have access to the router - if you have access to the PC, you can do whatever you want with it). A (very bad) workaround would be to change the password temporarily, so windows thinks it's a wrong password when it reconnects, and then ...


3

Your D-Link router is actually working as a switch or bridge, while the actual router for your LAN would be your Windows box. Just setting a default route won't suffice, because a default route only applies to packets from the host itself. It doesn't make a host route packets from one interface to another. If you want to keep your setup as it is (which ...


3

I have a D-Link and have had similar issues. Once in a while (used to be once a week on average) the router would suffer a crash in its wireless stack. This can be easily verified: you cannot browse to the router's admin site - it's down. But if you connect a laptop to an ethernet plug on the router, you can surf. If you look at the D-Link forums for the ...


3

Try doing this from a computer outside your own network. Most routers don't resolve internal/your own domains/IP's.


3

Based on the dd-wrt website, be sure to perform a 30/30/30 hard reset before you do anything with the firmware. To restore your original firmware, download it from the manufacturer's website. You should be able to just upload the original firmware after the 30/30/30 reset, but I would search/ask the dd-wrt forums to see if there are caveats for your ...


3

First thing is to try different settings on your wireless. Try a different channel - you may be getting interference from another source nearby. Try different encryption settings. Try moving your router to a different location.


3

It looks like the Alternative Power supply would be compatible. It has a higher current limit than the old one -- which is good. There's no indication of the polarity of the output for the old supply, but the alternative one (with the +ve connection in the centre) looks like the standard, so I think you're OK. But beware that if the old power supply was ...


3

Based on MaQleod comments above, I logged in to the Router's admin site, went to Advanced - Firewall Settings and changed Enable SPI => Unchecked UDP Endpoint Filtering => Endpoint Independent TCP Endpoint Filtering => Endpoint Independent The problem hasn't happened since... UPDATE: I have since changed the firmware of the router to use dd-wrt. I finally ...


3

. Their respective IP addresses are 192.168.0.1 (D-Link) and 192.168.1.1 (DSL modem) but they won't communicate if I put an ethernet cable between them. Are they on the same subnet? From the sounds of it, you need to put the modem into bridging mode and then have the router initiate the internet connection.


3

go to the wireless router setup and turn off its dhcp server and set up a fixed ip address to it. connect the wired router and the wireless router - lan connection to lan connection (as odd as it sounds) check if you can access the wireless router from a box connected to the wired router if so test the wired connection, then the wireless. This worked in a ...


3

It's not possible. The stock firmware has no shell and there is no known way to put one there without replacing the firmware entirely.


3

Your wifi mode is set to 802.11ng - it will support both 11n and older 11g clients. You can force 11n-only using the "Support 802.11n Client Only" box, or you can set the wifi mode accordingly. If either your NAS or your other device will not connect once the router is set to serve 11n only, it's likely that the device cannot (or is configured not to) ...


3

No, using DHCP reservations will not be as effective; while your router won't assign a DHCP address to a device whose MAC address it doesn't know, this does nothing to prevent an attacker simply assigning himself a static IP address in your range, and the router will happily communicate with him.


3

Preramble I really feel for ts(yo)u. ツ Yes, this is a known issue for the DIR-625 as well as the DIR-655 and possibly/probably others. It is indeed a massive oversight and/or poor design on the part of D-Link and frankly, quite inexcusable and unjustifiable (another example of reverse progress). Unfortunately, short of reverse-engineering the firmware ...


2

As regarding your question about using keywords to filter-out content, here is what the manual says about the setup page for Parental Control: Website URL: Enter the keywords or URLs that you want to block (or allow). Any URL with the keyword in it will be blocked (or allowed). As regarding your question of how to use OpenDNS, I am a bit puzzled ...


2

Hold the reset button for 30 seconds is the standard way to reset any router to factory default. Then use the factory default user name and password to relogin to the default ip address of the router to enter the router's configuration interface.


2

Unfortunately, routers can and do die, fortunately, if we're lucky it may be possible to revive them. Assuming you have checked the cabling to make sure nothing has changed or become loose and you've also tried a hard reset by holding the reset button in for at least 20 seconds and nothing changes, you may have a more severe problem, if so you can try the ...


2

Since it isn't a dual-radio router, it will only be able to run on a single frequency. Therefore, you won't be able to connect to it on 5Ghz and 2.4Ghz simultaneously, forcing you to only use 2.4Ghz. The WiFi G devices won't be negatively affected, but the WiFi N devices won't be able to use the new 5Ghz band, which would have had reduced interference.


2

I would say it is because the DLink DWA-552 adapter doesn't support the 5 GHz band. Looking at the specs for the adapter it says it supports IEEE 802.11n and IEEE 802.11g which is the first clue. Usually wireless devices which support the 5 GHz band also include support for 802.11a. Since this adapter does not, it calls into question whether it supports 5 ...



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