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Your approach is flawed. You will only zero-fill the remaining free space of the SSD because you're doing it from the OS. That is bad in many ways, as the OS itself can have remnants of your confidential files in its caches/event logs/whatever, and this utility won't erase them because technically they are still a file. You should use a Linux live-CD ...


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I'm not specialist, yet it is one of the SSDs features that they are hard to recover. Each manufacturer uses their own algorithms to distribute data over memory cells (as there is limited amount of write operations for each cell, it is crucial for the disk controller to use cells as equally as possible) - these algorithms are by nature very similar to ...


2

You will be able to reinstall Windows 8.1 after using Zero Fill software, don't worry about it. And even if you are worried about the write count on your disk, some other users may be worried. You (and the others) don't need to be concerned. Those guys wrote lots and lots of data to some SSDs before they failed. A Zero Fill software will not create any wear ...


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For obvious security reasons, Windows has been disabling that sort of functionality in their latest systems (7 and above) for USB drives. This because hackers developed a technique of dropping infected USB sticks in all sorts of common rooms, hoping that someone would plug them into their machines trying to see who the owner was. The hacker then hoped that ...


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Data recovery takes a long time, especially if we're talking about a lot of data, and extra-especially if the drive is faulty/damaged. :) All recovery programs will take about the same amount of time to do the same job. Formatting the drive will only make it harder to recover data (since every time you write to the drive you most-likely overwrite some of ...


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This is a very bad idea. First off, you're going to have to replicate each of the lands and pits onto a new CD. Not easy. Secondly, let's say you are trying to recover just 1MB off of a CD by recording each land and pit you see. If you record per bit, you'll be reading upwards of 8 million bits. Now, let's say you can do 2 bits a second. That would be ...


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A 700 MB CD-ROM will have 360,000 sectors, each of which have 2,352 bytes, each of which have 8 bits. So that's 6,773,760,000 1's and 0's you'll be reading with your microscope. If you can read and record 1 bit per second without error for 12 hours a day, you'll be able to get the data off your disk in about 430 years. A microscope that could discern 500 ...



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