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70

The proper way is to get yourself a shredder that also handles cds - look online for cd shredders. This is the right option if you end up doing this routinely. I don't do this very often - For small scale destruction I favour a pair of tin snips - they have enough force to cut through a cd, yet are blunt enough to cause small cracks along the sheer line. ...


52

This website explains 10 creative ways of doing this: Wraps the discs with food wrap then fold it. Shred the discs. There are several CD shredder machines, that operate like common paper shredders. Cut the discs. If you don't use a shredder, a heavy pair of scissors can easily cut through a disc. The reflective foil will crack and ...


37

Imagine a library in 1970. You had all the shelves with the books on them and you had drawers with cards that could tell you where the book you were looking for was located. On a hard drive, you have a table (the drawers) that's separate from the files (the books). Your operating system references this table when it needs to find data. It then goes to the ...


36

Overview The longevity of the data stored on any drive depends on the conditions where it is stored and for how long. For hard drives, there are three main factors: magnetic field breakdown, environmental conditions, and mechanical failure. Magnetic Field Breakdown Most sources state that permanent magnets lose their magnetic field strength at a rate ...


34

Ahh, the dark arts of file identification I rather like trid for this. It identifies and renames files if you choose, has a nice large database, and is totally independant of file, so you have two approaches at your disposal.


33

In general, deleted files don't go anywhere. They remain on the disk exactly as they were until they happen to get overwritten. When they are deleted, a link to it is simply removed from the file system structure.


28

The answer by Journeyman Geek is good enough for almost everything. But oddly, that common phrase "Good enough for government work" does not apply - depending on which part of the government. It is technically possible to recover data from shredded/broken/etc CDs and DVDs. If you have a microscope handy, put the disc in it and you can see the pits. The disc ...


26

Look at the USB connector in your first picture. To the left of it, there are four solder joints fixing it to the printed circuit board. The topmost one (in the image) appears to be cracked, and to have been soldered poorly in the first place. This is a common problem with USB memory sticks. Usually the USB connector is mounted without any kind of strain ...


21

Why would you format if you are trying to recover files? Formatting wipes the disk; that’s the whole point. It doesn’t matter whether you do a quick or full format, the purpose of formatting is to erase the drive and mark it as empty. A quick format may only wipe the FAT instead of the clusters containing the actual files, but any recovery attempt will be ...


20

Save time, I just use a 5lb hammer. Note: wear safety goggles. Or buy one of these


19

I think the value function can be useful for you = VALUE(< CELL >) PD: In spanish we use the function VALOR: = VALOR(< CELL >) i think it should be the same on english


19

I broke a capacitor off a (very expensive) video card once. I am not the best with a soldering iron, so I didn't want to risk ruining my card. I brought it to a TV repair shop in my area and the technician was able to solder it back on. It cost me $30, I think. That might work for you.


18

On newer drives, even the high-power magnets I used to use don't work anymore to erase the disk. If you have a spike, or similar object (hard metal that is pointed, think of a nail that is much bigger) and drive it through the center of the chassis with a hammer. That will bend the platers and damage the heads making it extremely difficult to recover. A ...


18

If the tape is DECtape, you will definitely need to find a TU-56 drive to read it. TU-56 units are going to be pretty hard to come by, and would likely require some repair (replacement of old capacitors, decaying wiring, burned out indicators). As far as hosts go, you are way more likely to find a working vax than a working pdp-8, but you will need the right ...


17

I typically put my old CDROMs in a plastic bag and use oven mits to bend them. This protects my hands from shards and protects the surroundings from flying projectile shards.


16

Photorec is designed specifically for this. It looks at file headers for various well known files and recovers photos - it does however mangle up filenames so you may need to rebuild these from exif data. CGsecurity also has an application called testdisk for whole drive recovery, which the OP ended up using. This is useful where you know the disk is in ...


15

Dectapes are easily differentiable from standard open-reel tapes as they were 1-inch wide and the reels were maybe 4-5 inches in diameter, and the flanges were maybe a half-inch deep. Dectape was one of the most robust media of its day, if not THE most robust. It had redundant timing and data tracks and could be read or written in either direction. The ...


15

You're correct; physical destruction is the only good way to do this (you'd need a magnet so strong that it's not feasible to get one for most people unless you're on staff at the Large Hadron Collider). Professional disposal operations generally do this with an industrial metal shredder. For you, bending the platters with a hammer, sandpapering them, and ...


15

The data on the HD will last much more than two years, so there is a very good chance you can recover it. The only problem might be that new hardware could be incompatible with old hardware, but two years isn't long at all.


15

To me that looks fixable with a fine point iron and multicore solder. You may find it easiest to bridge the gap with wire rather than attempting to put it back into its original shape. Alternatively, if you don't have a soldering iron, you may just about be able to strap it up with tape to make contact - I've done this on older hardware but never on USB. ...


14

Since your question seems more to be 'How can this be' (and not "How can I copy this disk") I'll try to answer to that: When viewing video it's OK to skip/drop corrupted frames, similarly this also applies to audio. They can get away with this because your brain can make up the difference (in minor cases) so it still appears fine to your eyes/ears. Even ...


14

This assumes you're going for an archive rather than regular backup or live data. Go for a set of SATA hard drives (1 or 2 TB), plus a few extras. Copy your data onto the disks. Use QuickPar (or an archiver which support parity volumes) to create additional parity files. Distribute parity files among your hard disks. The parity info will allow you to ...


13

A link to photorec was posted, but it only finds known file types. My files were of all random types. The nice thing, is photorec comes with testdisk. Using testdisk, I worked on the image I made with dd : # dd if=/dev/sdg of=~/tmp/sd.bin # sudo apt-get install testdisk #if on ubuntu/debian # testdisk ~/tmp/sd.bin (Select the partition) (Advanced) (Boot) ...


13

If you can play the video with VLC, you should also be able to dump the video as it is played. One way to do this is to go to: Media -> Convert/Save, select the video file, choose "Convert", enter the destination, and select "Dump raw input".


13

Apparently the method a certain british university uses is drilling a hole through it. Failing which, thermite.


13

Yes, it will "delete or damage" files... Recuva may be fairly decent on getting them back, however, there is an inherent risk in doing that. A better approach would be to boot a Linux Live CD and mount it to try and recover the data. (Live CD List). The simplest one is probably Ubuntu, which you can go through it with the GUI (rather than command line).


12

You cannot. RAID 0 caused half of data to be on one disk and half on other. You literally have block of data interleaving one another (in order to maximize performance). I am not aware of any tool that can come even close to untangling that mess and even if there was such tool, you can hope for 64K block recovery topmost. Best chance is either finding same ...


12

The short version: theoretically, the original pattern can still be read by certain sophisticated hardware and software. To ensure the security of your "erased" data, it must be wiped. The long answer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_remanence Edit: In fairness to those that have already voted, I'm leaving my answer as originally written; however, do ...


11

GetDataBack is a spectacular program that works on both FAT and NTFS. But it costs money, 80 dollars to be exact. It's completely worth it in my opinion, but maybe your looking for something free. Get Data Back Life hacker has a few ideas that you might try, but i haven't tried any of these. However, no matter what you use you CANNOT install it on the ...


11

The conventional wisdom is that you should revisit your data every five years to make sure that you can still read it. The general consensus is that the magnetic platters in the drive will start to degrade in 5 years of storage. The bigger issue is that storage technology changes. That means a format that works today will be unreadable 5-10 years from now. ...



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