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Iomega Automatic Backup Pro's method of backing up files (if you have selected to do it unencrypted) is just the original files with an extra 17 bytes prepended to them and a bit of renaming. This handy bash command could help with stripping those bytes out on Linux and changing the file names back to the originals. find infolder/ -name '*.IAB' -type f -...


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If Exiv2 is not able to extract relevant meta data, it could be that data doesn't exist. Not every photographer adds his or her name or general tags to their photos, however much of the default information should be there. Their website provides clear examples on how to use their software. Try using the -pt command like this: $ exiv2 -pt img_1771.jpg The ...


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I've ultimately managed to solve the problem. It seems either that TestDisk corrupted a part of the filesystem, or that the extracted contents themselves did that. For anyone who might run into a similar problem (a hierarchy of files that refuse to be deleted), try this: Open cmd with administrative rights, and cd into the parent directory of the corrupted ...


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IN most of the cases in it a problem either with magnet heads (assembly). Heads mounted on Head Stack Assembly or HSA. When the computer starts up during the POST procedure HDD is initialized (firmware, size, parameters, mode, interface) and reported to BIOS. During this phase HSA goes off the landing zone (where is it parked) and the heads are reading ...


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It is possible if OEM recovery was used. Īt usually comes preinstalled on a hidden HDD partition and contains clean Windows with integrated OEM drivers. It may be started from BIOS startup screen by function key.


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You can try a different approach, i.e. using a FUSE wrapper to "mount" a remote file via HTTP and the invoke standard tools on it. The tools will try to read specific bytes and those attempts will be translated to HTTP byte-range GET requests. This has been discussed on StackOverflow, in this great answer by Adam which uses HTTPFS: Mount a remote zip ...


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My question is how this is possible. Large files are likely to be non-contiguous on disk. This just means that the data is scattered in several places, not all together. A consequence is that when a file is deleted, another file can be written to an area of disk that used to be in the middle of the deleted file. If you then attempt to recover the deleted ...


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If you used Ubuntu's built-in encryption during the Ubiquity installation process, your disk was encrypted with LUKS. In a LUKS partition, the header is up to the first two mebibytes (2MiB). If you can't recover the header, you can't recover your data because the header contains the key to decrypt the rest of the partition. To get that key, you need a ...


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A general overview. In the abstract: Don't panic, don't hurry, do no harm. Back up an image of the USB drive device to your hard drive. Once a good image is made, leave it alone, it's a safety. Find out how bad the situation is using (lossless) compression. Make a 2nd copy of the image. Compress the image with some util. If it doesn't compress very ...


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Do not use the drive or try further amateur recovery... that will make matters worse. Unplug it. Since you state you do not have the required expertise, find a reliable data recovery service, but be prepared for expenses in the hundreds or thousands of euros (or dollars). It is possible that some files can be recovered, but using a disk partition tool makes ...


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From my (admittedly limited) experience, the problem is that with a live USB there is in effect only one partition exactly the size of the disk image used to create it. To the best of my knowledge, there is no solution because live USBs were not meant to be used like full systems. What you could try doing is fully installing an OS to your USB and then ...


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I don't quite understand what you've done with the disk. If all you've done is run clean, and then you didn't touch the disk, there's a good chance you can rebuild most of the file system - there's a number of recovery tools out there : [I've done this at least once - clean doesn't do much damage, but the rebuild takes a long time] http://www.gfi.com/blog/...


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Yes, there's extundelete, which should be able to recover directory structure and file names, in addition to file content. On ubuntu, install it with sudo apt-get install extundelete, and run it with something like sudo extundelete --restore-directory /home/deletedhomedirectory/ /dev/sda1 (/dev/sda1 is the partition where the deleted data was, note that ...


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Recovering data To recover data you can use photorec , or ddrescue To fix the MBR You can use testdisk to fix the MBR , or you can delete the existing partition an rewrite the MBR table using GPARTED. Edit Open the terminal and type: sudo testdisk Select "create a new log file" Select your micro-sd and press enter select the partition type In the ...



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