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You can use the MiTeC Mail Viewer: Description Viewer for standalone files containing Microsoft Outlook Express 4,5 and 6 message database (.idx/.mbx/*.dbx), Windows Vista Mail/Windows Live Mail and Mozilla Thunderbird message databases as well as standalone EML files. This application is based on MiTeC Outlook Express Reader. It ...


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If you format the drive data recovery won't be faster. If you are sure that the original problem is with a corrupted NTFS table you could try using some kind of partition recovery software. However the best option is such cases it to use the services of a data recovery company. Data recovery is not an easy process and if you aren't a 100% sure what and why ...


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Data recovery on large volume drives can be such an agony especially if you are using window's tools to recover the same drive that windows is unable to read. I have had success recovering similar raw and unrecognized drives using linux distros as well. My suggestion: Download Ultimate Boot CD, make a bootable USB or CD of it. Boot from it and launch Parted ...


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Data recovery can take a while, although I've never seen a hard drive have to take that long to be read from and repair. What kind of state is the drive in, is it making noises, does it report bad sectors, what happened to it to make the NTFS table corrupt? I'd start by using a tool such as ddrescue (packaged in linux as gddrescue) and imaging the drive to ...


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Data recovery takes a long time, especially if we're talking about a lot of data, and extra-especially if the drive is faulty/damaged. :) All recovery programs will take about the same amount of time to do the same job. Formatting the drive will only make it harder to recover data (since every time you write to the drive you most-likely overwrite some of ...


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try GetDataBack. It has version for FAT32 and NTFS too. SpinRite also comes to my mind and it can fix a lot of types of disk damage and is file system independent, but it is not free.


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Testdisk I'm sure will help you here. It's an awesome tool and at the very least using Photorec will enable you to get your files back (albeit not in their original structure). Testdisk on the other hand should be able to get you the files and their original structure. You should have a look through the Testdisk docs but in essence once you've selected your ...


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For obvious security reasons, Windows has been disabling that sort of functionality in their latest systems (7 and above) for USB drives. This because hackers developed a technique of dropping infected USB sticks in all sorts of common rooms, hoping that someone would plug them into their machines trying to see who the owner was. The hacker then hoped that ...


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It would depend on who you were logged in as at the time. Previously you were logged in as the admin as it was in that user accounts desktop folder that you located the files. Each user has their own desktop folder that holds everything you put on your desktop. You may also have network accounts (if this is your work PC for instance) so the administrator ...


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I'm assuming the partition you moved contained /boot? Try this question: http://askubuntu.com/questions/299886/partitions-is-it-safe-to-move-partition-containing-boot


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Found a solution! I had to run ntfsfix on the disk using: ntfsfix /dev/loop0 And then it mounted just fine!


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Deep search can find files that are removed from FAT. Try different tools, you may never know which might help you. try easeus, R-studio, steller, phoneix, recuva, remo recover like software to recover data.But remo recover software had helped me when i accidently deleted all the partitions while installing linux. If you tried all the tools available tools ...


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Your approach is flawed. You will only zero-fill the remaining free space of the SSD because you're doing it from the OS. That is bad in many ways, as the OS itself can have remnants of your confidential files in its caches/event logs/whatever, and this utility won't erase them because technically they are still a file. You should use a Linux live-CD ...


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Read this article about SSD endurance testing. It means you can write many GB per day for several years. Of course some disks will fail to meet this, but overall this should work out for almost all disks. Your one time secure erase won't harm it. Grueling endurance test blows away SSD durability fears


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You will be able to reinstall Windows 8.1 after using Zero Fill software, don't worry about it. And even if you are worried about the write count on your disk, some other users may be worried. You (and the others) don't need to be concerned. Those guys wrote lots and lots of data to some SSDs before they failed. A Zero Fill software will not create any wear ...


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I'm not specialist, yet it is one of the SSDs features that they are hard to recover. Each manufacturer uses their own algorithms to distribute data over memory cells (as there is limited amount of write operations for each cell, it is crucial for the disk controller to use cells as equally as possible) - these algorithms are by nature very similar to ...


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If you're looking for software where it might be possible to "substantiate the trustworthiness of the software" you might consider using PhotoRec (part of the testdisk software). It's source code is available to browse, and it's also in the Debian & Ubuntu (linux distros) repositories, and has been for years. Photorec was originally designed to recover ...


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If the photos were stored on a microSD card etc., the best way is to plug it in to a PC and run a recovery software like PuranFileRecovery or Recuva (personally I recommend Puran, however Recuva recovers files with modification dates, if you care about that). They are portable, easy to use, and usually yield good results, as long as the data wasn't deleted a ...


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It looks to me you have at least four choices - there are probably more. The last choice is forget about it, but we'll come to that. The first choice is to decide if you want to go the professional data recovery service way, the price could be as low as 300 US when you are fortunate enough to have the HDD crash just the right way - or it is healthy but the ...


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Ok, I'll take a stab at it... Firstly, bitrot is a term usually meaning 'silent bit corruption'. How serious a problem is it? It is debatable. Typically a sector(s) goes bad and the HDD replaces it/them without you knowing. So for example, an image falls on a sector that goes bad and you get a partially corrupt image or worse, on a ZIP file, you lose the ...


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kinda vague Q... but when I get read errors there's some sort of message, like "read error on ..." and the read fails. If you're worried about backups going bad, make 2 backups, and keep a checksum like crc32, or if concerned about tampering md5, sha, etc...


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"We should backup our important files to something else like shared server, LAN, cloud storage not limit on the disk. As long as the data isn't overwritten, your files should be still in disk. As Maudam said, try EaseUS Data Recovery. "


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Most likely you have two options -- pay for a data recovery service (typical 2014 cost $100 to $200 for the attempt, no guarantee you get anything back), or obtain and learn to use a "forensic file recovery" package. I've used one of those, several years ago, to recover data from a hard disk with head impact damage (computer fell about 1.5 meters on ...



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