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@Michael Kjörling has a very good, thorough answer, but I think I'll post here also since I have some info on the data recovery aspect. "Nowadays everyone has windows and softwares installed on a ssd. But most people still have HDDs for their personnal data" I think nowadays most people still just have one drive, but yes, that is much more common ...


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Still, price aside, is it a good idea to replace this data drive with a ssd? Whether it is "a good idea" is largely subjective, but there are some workloads that can benefit from the additional I/O speed of a SSD compared to a rotational HDD. Particularly, any seek-heavy workload will be helped by the SSD's much greater IOPS capability ("seek speed"; ...


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That depends, unless you play games, only the OS and Programs really benefit from an SSD, which can fit on a 256 or 120 GB SSD. So no, a normal consumer does not need an SSD for media or other mass storage uses. Some creative applications use scratch disks, which can benefit from faster storage.


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As mentioned in the comments above, it looks like a low-level I/O error is occurring. Chances probably aren't very good, but SpinRite may be able to help. Remove the drive from its USB enclosure and connect it to a SATA port on the motherboard of a PC. Then, boot to a SpinRite CD and run a recovery operation (there are various recovery options, but often ...


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From the description and images (great on both), it appears there are either a lot of bad sectors or a head is not reading. As @qasdfdsaq commented, it's possible the USB is hung up on one bad sector making the drive inaccessible. First you should clone the drive with ddrescue or similar if you want to work on it yourself. That prevents anything you try ...


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Can you swap out the usb cable? Have you tried another port? Most likely an error on the drive but worth a try.


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Your deleted or lost files, folder, or other kind of data does not go anywhere when you give command for deletion. Instead, the index associated with it gets removed when you delete it. The index is the entry of each file of your computer in the ‘Index Table’ of the Operating System (OS). Since a deleted file does not have the index entry in the ‘Index ...


2

Generally, without the HDD password, all data on a password-protected HDD is lost. There are tools which claim to make such a drive usable but they effectively erase the data on it. I believe this is an inevitable part of the process. There are claims that the password can be recovered from the HDD for specific models recovering protection passwords from ...


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What you shared with us were, in all probability, threshold values, and not actual values... Unfortunately it's very easy to mix those two values. Unless it showed those thresholds already exceeded. But both by identical 200? Not bloody likely. Those two counts are critical. However, reallocated sectors count is being done on the fly and is considered ...


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I agree with @Deltik conclusion, but not entirely what he surmises. S.M.A.R.T is meant to predict failures - the problem it does not do a particularly good job of it. Its possible the drive will last some time (more then 8 weeks), but is unhappy and broken. The prudent thing to do is to replace the drive and move the data onto the new drive. Assuming ...


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Back up your data. Brace for a crash. (You should already be backing up important data in the first place.) What Your Symptoms Mean As suggested in this comment, we can best answer your question if you provide the full output of the S.M.A.R.T. attributes. You did provide other information that we can use to guess the condition of your drive, though. I ...


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Minitool power data recovery is data recovery software that can recover data from lost partitions. I would say try their free version which works for 1 GB, and if it works it is fairly inexpensive (somewhere around $70 USD) to buy the full version.


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If you did a full delete of your files and they really have a big value for you, I'd stop doing anything on that drive, go to a harddrive recovery lab near to yours, and... recover your data if its really valuable. I had that kind (without formatting the data or anything) of issue with a damaged hard drive and I was quite surpised of the output I got from ...


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I got bad news man ... but I'm pretty sure you just did a hard-format (not sure, I did not try it).You could go see a professional in HDD recovery but it'll cost you a lot. If the data was not this valuable or you don't have the money ... just format it back to NTFS and try, but As I said, you should try different program first !


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if you only formatted the drive without writing any other data, your data should be fine. I don't think that formatting it back to NTFS will destroy your data but if you can find a program that can recover the data from RAW that would be the safest way to recover them. However, if you installed Linux after formatting the drive, you have probably damaged ...


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That's a difficult thing to solve at a large distance. Possibly (and hopefully) the harddisk wasn't really formatted, but just the partition table changed. If your NTFS partition was set to RAW, then you can maybe set the type back to NTFS using some utility like gparted. If you look at the homepage, you can find a bootable USB version (several others too). ...


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If you tried to run recovery and found nothing missing and your hard drive is healthy, you can check this with crystal disk info. Then windows was misreporting your free space, or cleared up some temp files on restart. I have had similar problems when my hard drive is close to full.


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I've seen similar cases where the start of a filesystem was mistakenly overwritten. Recovery is sometimes possible by mounting the filesystem with a backup superblock.


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NO, there isn't anywhere else! unless you saved it somewhere else (hard disk, cloud based storage ,etc)


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You could also stream strings cmd.exe | find "Version" might work too. Most files have the version of windows in their property sheet, which is visible in the raw binary near the end of it. One of these is the windows version. It's in unicode though.


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Simple. Look at the version of <drive>:\Windows\System32\ntoskrnl.exe In the case of XP, look for <drive>:\boot.ini If it is Vista+ you can look for the <drive>:\Boot folder. For Windows 7+ you can look in device manager for the hidden System Reserved partition. If there is a file named license.rtf in your C:\Windows\System32 folder, ...


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I was able to fix this problem... somehow. I'm not sure why it worked this time, but when I plugged the USB cord in, shut the computer down and turned it on again, my computer recognized the drive! :)


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When you boot your computer have your external drive disconnected. Attach it after fully booting and see if that helps. Also check out the following link. http://www.howtogeek.com/193669/whats-the-difference-between-gpt-and-mbr-when-partitioning-a-drive/


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As long as your second partition was always there and not created overlapping your deleted first partition it should be recoverable. You can use a linux live CD and install testdisk to recover it. Here is a step by step guide: http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/15761/recover-data-like-a-forensics-expert-using-an-ubuntu-live-cd/ Boot any linux live CD, e.g. ...


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You need to use Hirens Boot in order to solve this. Here's the step to in USB: Hiren's BootCD From USB Flash Drive (USB Pen Drive). Or you can use this Tool Hiren's CD 2 Bootable USB Installer


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I have had similar issues and recovered a large part of a damaged hard drive using testdisk. Basically, this involves (assuming repairing a windows formatted partition): Boot into Linux, and clone the damaged partition or the entire disk into a big file on another healthy hard drive. e.g. dd if=/dev/sda6 bs=1k conv=sync,noerror | gzip -c | dd ...


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I made sure that the first depicted partition was written as Primary, but was unable to verify the correctness in Ubuntu, even after installing all hfs packages i could find on short notice, adding "hfs" and "hfsplus" to /etc/modules, using sudo fsck.hfsplus -f /dev/sdb1, and rebooting multiple times: vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-trusty-64:~$ sudo mount -o force ...



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