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I have seen this quite a bit with cheap china drives. I have probably 100 flash drives that my work bought and were supposed to be 2gb drives with our logo on them. Most only have 128MB useable space. if you write any more than that you might as well consider it lost. I have also seen sd cards that were this way as well. ...


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If the corrupted computer can still load, but not allow one to logon, then you may be able to use a rescue disk/usb drive to boot and then access the files directly. On a Window system, you have a password and profile, but this actually does not protect the files natively at the disk level. If you are using full disk encryption, then a recovery disc may ...


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I found what I needed: snapraid! Basically is backup using raid 5. You can only do snapshots but it serves my purpose. You can recover data in the event of motherboard and\or disk failure (i checked by myself). Thank you to everyone!


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Try to run fdisk -l /dev/sdb to see if the partitions are valid. If so, you could be trying to access the wrong partition (/dev/sdb instead of /dev/sdb1). If the partition are valid and you are acessing the wrong one, you could try to access the correct one instead. But if the partitions are not valid, I don't think you will be able to recover anything from ...


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Depends on your budget and what hardware you have access to. There are professional computer forensic service that will happily retrieve your data for a reasonable cost. I've had hdd with broken controller, crashed head etc. done by them before, costs about £500-£1000. So your scenario is just a walk in the park for them. For DIY recovery, I've had good ...


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As Ramhound pointed out in the comment, files can become fragmented which means that they don't take up one contiguous space in a medium. When you delete the index to a file, the recovery program has to now look through the whole medium to find every piece to be able to put it together. This is for just one file. Imagine how long this process is for every ...


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A file could be scattered in pieces on your disk. So when you delete the file, those pieces are still there but orphan of the entry on a table that permits to find them. To "undelete" the file it's needed to scan all the disk. When you format a disk you're erasing a table, not erasing the entire disk. After the format, the files are still there.


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The answer is NO. Deleted files can be recovered in some cases. But this can only be done if the file has not been overwritten. Once the file has been overwritten there is no software recovery. There are studies of methods for low level data recovery with the use of electron microscope, but this is very expensive, always leads to the destruction of the ...


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There are a million ways to do that. you can write a script to upload only files with a modification time of less than insert last time you uploaded. example find -mtime 2 to find files modified 2*24h ago. but really, use rsync. it works via ftp. This is what you want http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5986942/how-to-copy-all-files-via-ftp-in-rsync


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Use your DVD writing software to create a multi-session DVD. Write your parity files in the first session, then in the next session, the data. This will put your parity files close to the hole. I am not aware how to enforce ordering in an ISO image.


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You can use a program like PhotoRec to attempt to recover the data. (Despite the name, it tries to recover everything, not just photos.) Do not do anything which is likely to write to the disk you are attempting to recover from. You really want to attach it to another computer if you can, or use something like Hiren's BootCD which has PhotoRec on it. I ...


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If the bad disk is still recognized by the computer and not freezing dead when it starts hitting bad sector, you can connect it and a good empty disk of at least the same capacity to a linux machine and use ddrescue to do a sector-by-sector copy. Just be very very carefull with ddrescue to give the correct source and destination drive. If that does not ...


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I don't know if/how to fix your FS, but PhotoRec from the same author as TestDisk is quite good, in my experience, at recovering files. Maybe you should try and recover as much as possible before trying to fix it further?


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Open "Run" type in "diskmgmt.msc", this opens the disk manager. Find the drive, right-click on the drive, scroll to Change Drive Letters and Paths, you can then give it a dedicated drive letter. Every time you plug it into your computer, it will use the drive letter you assigned to it


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Thanks! we use the files for live audio/video shows and just want to exclude breakdowns due to defective data. However, everything seems to be OK, if Windows never copies defective data or shows an error message if there is something wrong.


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Not all hard disks have them. It's a dust/pollutants collection sticker that covers a hole in the hard drive casing. When you're troubleshooting a failing hard drive, you can peel off the sticker and look at the collection of stuff on the inside. If it's a couple of little grayish specs of dust, it's ok. If it's sut-y it may indicate for instance heavy ...


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"No Media" means the flash memory controller cannot communicate with the NAND flash memory on the drive. Because the controller cannot communicate with the memory on the drive, it appears to the computer as a empty disk drive. This is usually caused by the NAND flash failing. To the computer, the drive is not much different than a floppy or optical drive ...



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