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42

In the command line, type w32tm /query /configuration w32tm /query /status Time /T w32tm /query /configuration gives you the configuration you have set up. w32tm /query /status gives you information such as: stratum leap indicator precision last sync NTP server poll interval time /T outputs the current system time. Note: w32tm /query was first ...


40

I found a solution at http://www.nicholasoverstreet.com/2010/03/windows-7-annoyance-file-properties/. Go to 'Control Panel' → 'Region and Language' → 'Additional Settings' → Date tab. Remove the string dddd (e.g. change it to ddd) click 'Apply' and it should work fine. Explanation: 'Rightclick file properties' uses the value "Long Date" + ...


35

Windows is normally acting as an NTP client. It will just get its time up to date during the next update from the NTP server, which clearly has methods of handling leap seconds. This will happen, provided your system is setup to synchronize time via NTP. If it is not, then nothing will happen as Windows 7 does not have built-in functionality to deal with ...


34

How the Windows Time service treats a leap second The Windows Time service does not indicate the value of the Leap Indicator when the Windows Time service receives a packet that includes a leap second. (The Leap Indicator indicates whether an impending leap second is to be inserted or deleted in the last minute of the current day.) Therefore, ...


20

Check " man date ". You can let it display you the hours, minutes, seconds and nanoseconds with date +%H:%M:%S.%N See the output of while : ; do date +%H:%M:%S.%N ; done interrupt the infinite while loop with CTRL+C . If you want less decimal places you could do while : ; do date +%H:%M:%S.%N | cut -c 1-12 ; done Increase or decrease the output ...


18

You would need to divide the number of minutes by 1440 (24 hours in a day × 60 minutes in an hour) and then add that to the date. =B4+(B3/1440) or if you want to be more verbose... =B4+(B3/24/60) The reason this works is that Excel date+time values are stored as a floating point decimal number representing the number of days that have passed since ...


14

From terminal: sudo ntpdate -u time.apple.com


14

This is the way Excel sees dates. To see them the way you want they have to be formatted and when alone in a cell that can be done by changing the cell's formatting. When you want to combine a date with other things, such as text, you need to use formula to format the date the way you want. Here's how: Use the TEXT formula to change the date to text in the ...


14

You can use the GUI to set a custom date format for any given region: Open the Region control panel (intl.cpl from a terminal). Click Additional settings... at the bottom-right of the window. The Customize Format window will appear, click the Date tab. In the Short date field, enter your desired format. For example: d/M/yyyy. Click apply, and the changes ...


13

I've been looking at the same problem and as far as I can tell, no there isn't a way. However, I've been using a workaround that has satisified what I needed it for so hopefully it will help you. The following command, when run from a command line in the directory in question, will print out the file names and the modified date down to seconds: forfiles /...


12

Just set the cell to be shown in numerical format and it will show a decimal number. The integer part corresponds to the date value (i.e. the day) and the decimal part to the time of the day. If you multiply the numerical value of 1:45 (which is 0,07) by 24x60 (the number of hours in a day and the number of minutes in an hour) you will obtain the value in ...


12

It's important to note that Windows does show seconds. The hiding of seconds only happens in the main Explorer window: But Andrew wasn't asking about the main Explorer window, he was asking about the the Right-click -> Properties dialog, which does show seconds: If it works on Properties, why not in the main window? The reason you don't see seconds, ...


12

Try: value / 86400 + "1/1/1970" Division by 86400 is needed to convert it into days (product of 24 * 60 * 60), you then add the number of days between 1st Jan 1900 (which is where excel bases it's dates off) and 1st of Jan 1970.


11

GPS time isn't the same as UTC, it's just very close. GPS is a very accurate source as far as time differences go, but as it doesn't take into account leap seconds it hasn't actually been in sync with UTC since January 1980. However it's only about 15 seconds ahead, so that doesn't account for your 2 minute difference. If your other time sources are based ...


11

If the date cells are all in one column, here's a quick and dirty way: Assuming the dates are in A1 downwards, insert two columns to the right. In B1, put the formula: =DATE(YEAR(A1)-4,MONTH(A1), DAY(A1)) Copy this formula down the column to recalculate all the dates from column A. Now select and 'copy' column B (the new dates) and use 'paste as values/...


11

I got fed up with changing the time on my travels as well and just decided to build the product. So now there is a software for this: I called it TimeTraveller and you can find it on http://www.godotandco.com


11

The Date and Time format depends on what you've specified in the Region and Language Control Panel applet. Run the following batch file (which assumes dd/mm/yyyy and hh:mm:ss) and modify the substring extraction (using the : and ~ characters) as required to get the proper parts from both Date and Time strings: @echo off cls echo Date format = %date% echo ...


10

You can view the file creation/modification time quickly in PowerShell: PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file = C:\windows\notepad.exe PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file = Get-Item C:\windows\notepad.exe PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file.CreationTime Monday, July 13, 2009 6:56:36 PM PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file.LastAccessTime Monday, July 13, 2009 6:56:36 PM ...


10

It seems that Windows Time Service could not be started. Check if Windows Time Service is disabled. If yes enable it and set it to Automatic (open Run prompt and type "services.msc".Navigate to Windows Time, right click, select Properties and change Startup to Automatic). Try manually starting Windows Time Service (open Run prompt and type "services.msc"). ...


9

What RunAsDate does is the following: RunAsDate intercepts the kernel API calls that returns the current date and time (GetSystemTime, GetLocalTime, GetSystemTimeAsFileTime), and replaces the current date/time with the date/time that you specify. Under Linux you have some options to accomplish the same thing: If you can get a Windows version of the ...


9

It's region specific. I have Windows XP set up with Romanian regional settings; that automatically changes the first day of the week to Monday, but you can't change only that setting by yourself. However, looking over this thread over on tomshardware.com, there is a registry setting that can change this. I'm not sure what will happen, but you can take a ...


9

For Excel 2010, rather than opening your CSV file, create a new workbook, then on the DATA tab, select Get External Data → From Text. This gets to the interface where you can specify how to interpret your text data, including how to handle dates.


8

I think this will work: A1 6:23 B1 8:23 C1 =(B1-A1)*24*60 Just make sure you format C1 as "General"


8

By default, Excel uses a date system that begins with January 1, 1900. A negative time value generates a date-time combination that falls before this date, which is invalid. The solution is to use the 1904 date system. Select Tools, Options. In the Options dialog box, click the Calculation tab and check the 1904 date system option to change the starting ...


8

It sounds like the computer thinks it is part of a Domain. As you mentioned the internet time tab is disabled for domain environments. The computer will sync with the domain controller and there isn't a way to have it sync to the internet in domains. I think this article from Microsoft might help. It provides a number of registry values that effect this ...


8

Your code works fine for me. Although I have to use B1 : =TEXT(A1,"dd.mm.yyyy") B2 : =TEXT(A2,"dd mm yyyy") I am guessing the reason I use , instead of ; is due to the difference of language. The fault is more likely to be due to dd.mm.yyyy For example, I know in Germany, I can't use dd because d (day) in German is tag, and as such it requires tt ...


8

I've figured out a better answer than hacking the registry... Thanks to zppinto for putting me on the right track. The problem remained that the time format was still US when no user is logged in. First activate the hidden administrator user account: Run the Command Prompt as administrator Type in net user to see all the user accounts Type in net user ...


7

Unfortunately I made some mistakes when I posted my question. I wanted to bypass the NTP service of my computer to provide an independent source of internet time information and used two simple utilities for that. I believed these utilities were getting time information from the internet using NTP when they in fact were displaying the (wrong) local time on ...


7

Here's something I found with a quick search: Generically you can get the nth xday of the month with this formula =DATE(B2,A2,1+7*n)-WEEKDAY(DATE(B2,A2,8-xday)) where year is in B2 and month (as a number 1 to 12) is in A2, and where xday is a number representing the day of the week (1 = Sun through to 7 = Sat), so for 1st Saturday that becomes ...



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