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20

In response to Jordan W.'s question, the simple but strange solution I found at http://www.nicholasoverstreet.com/2010/03/windows-7-annoyance-file-properties/ worked for me. Basically, it involves changing the day of the week component of the "Long date" format found under Control Panel > Region and Language > Additional Settings... > Date tab. ...


9

The reason you don't see seconds, is that it was a usability decision to remove them (99% of users don't care about the second a file was last modified). To accomplish this, the shell team is calling GetTimeFormatEx, using the flag asking for it to remove seconds: GetTimeFormatEx(..., TIME_NOSECONDS, ...); which returns the Short time format:: with ...


9

You can view the file creation/modification time quickly in PowerShell: PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file = C:\windows\notepad.exe PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file = Get-Item C:\windows\notepad.exe PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file.CreationTime Monday, July 13, 2009 6:56:36 PM PS C:\Users\mskfisher> $file.LastAccessTime Monday, July 13, 2009 6:56:36 PM ...


7

It's region specific. I have Windows XP set up with Romanian regional settings; that automatically changes the first day of the week to Monday, but you can't change only that setting by yourself. However, looking over this thread over on tomshardware.com, there is a registry setting that can change this. I'm not sure what will happen, but you can take a ...


7

Try: value / 86400 + "1/1/1970" Division by 86400 is needed to convert it into days (product of 24 * 60 * 60), you then add the number of days between 1st Jan 1900 (which is where excel bases it's dates off) and 1st of Jan 1970.


6

They are Unix Epoch millisecond date/time stamps. Here is one converter or you could always write your own. Basically it is the number of milliseconds since 1/1/1970 not counting leap seconds. Assuming you have a UNIX shell handy, they can be converted to any format using the date tool with the argument --date=${epoch_time}, for example: $ date ...


5

Horloger supports milliseconds at least. Looks great:


5

This will work: =(TODAY()-DATEVALUE("5/31/1996"))/365.25 As will this: =(TODAY()-A1)/365.25 where A1 contains an Excel datevalue.


5

"How do I use a single formula to calculate the difference in years between two dates?" Because of the exact way you have phrased your question I think the DATEDIF formula will better suit you. Try using the below formula. It's simple! Hope this helps. :) =DATEDIF("05/31/1996",TODAY(),"Y") Or =DATEDIF(A1,TODAY(),"Y") "Y" makes the formula count the ...


5

You would need to divide the number of minutes by 1440 (24 hours in a day × 60 minutes in an hour) and then add that to the date. =B4+(B3/1440) or if you want to be more verbose... =B4+(B3/24/60) The reason this works is that Excel date+time values are stored as a floating point decimal number representing the number of days that have passed since ...


5

It's the same. It hasn't changed since Windows XP. To change the delay, simply edit the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\w32time\TimeProviders\NtpClient The value there is the number of seconds between updates.


5

It's basically tied to the region you have configured in XP (Control Panel > Regional and Language Options). For example, if I set my region to English (United States) then the calendar starts on a Sunday: If I change the region to English (United Kingdom) then the calendar starts on a Monday: I don't think there is any other way to configure it.


5

Yes, try the following People who use Windows may have noticed that the clock in the system tray displays time in the 24 hour format by default. I always prefer 12 hour format, if you want to know how to change it or if you simply want to get rid of AM and PM to save the space to stick in one more taskbar icon! Well, here is the solution. ...


5

You can use an IF statement to achieve that as follows: =IF(ISBLANK(B2);DAYS360(A2;C2);DAYS360(A2;B2))


4

What about: echo $(($(date -d "$(date +00:00-24:00)" +%s)-$(date +%s)))


4

From terminal: sudo ntpdate -u time.apple.com


4

Excel is able to display times in a time stamp format, but you need to define a custom cell format for that like this [h]:mm:ss – note the brackets, which are denoting that the hours do not roll over at 24, but keep counting up. If you define this and assign it to column D, you should be able to input a duration of 46:00:00 in D2 (you can skip the seconds in ...


4

Timezone is a part of the "systeminfo" command output.


4

I've been looking at the same problem and as far as I can tell, no there isn't a way. However, I've been using a workaround that has satisified what I needed it for so hopefully it will help you. The following command, when run from a command line in the directory in question, will print out the file names and the modified date down to seconds: forfiles ...


4

When you connect to the internet if set up in the Date/Time Preference Pane the computer will retrieve the time from a time server (in this case, most likely time.apple.com) and set it to the proper time. If the time is being reset to January 1st, 2001 you most likely have a dead PRAM/Clock/CMOS battery or something odd happening with your PRAM. You can try ...


4

Every computer's internal clock counts from some particular start date, so if there's some kind of calendar glitch, you get whatever default date the computer thinks of as Year Zero. Macs used to be January 1, 1900, but I think now they've moved up to 2001, just to be confusing.


4

If you entered either of the values you give, the cell doesn't contain a date, it contains a string. You can't change as string just by changing the format! Excel tries to guess your data type, and that can be really confusing. If you enter some kind of data with an obvious type (date, time, date/time, number) it can figure that out. If the type isn't ...


4

I think this formula will work: =IF(B1>A1, TEXT(B1-A1,"-h:mm:ss"), TEXT(A1-B1,"h:mm")) But only for time differences less than 24 hours. For longer periods you could use: =IF(B1>A1, "-",) & TEXT(INT(ABS(B1-A1)), "#,##0") & "d " & TEXT(MOD(ABS(B1-A1), 1), "hh:mm") for a result like this (I right justified the remaining time): DueDate ...


4

OMGBBQ this is challenging! I wish I could explain this better, but please bear with me. My solution requires some additional real estate -- 3 columns to be exact -- and is based on a few assumptions: The time stamp data would have alternating rows of 1's and 0's, emulating an on/off switch like you described (See Image 1 below). Time stamps are arranged ...


3

Let's say in A1 you enter the time of the first round: 08:00 Then you can create the following formula in A2: =A1+time(0;randbetween(25;30);0) (Replace semicolons with commas if that's what your regional settings dictate.) And copy/paste that cell downwards for as many rounds you need to run.


3

touch only changes the creation time if the target modification time is before the original creation time. for f in ~/Desktop/*; do old=$(stat -f %B -t %s "$f") touch -t $(date -r $(($old - 1234567)) +%Y%m%d%H%M%S) "$f" done SetFile always changes the creation time. It comes with the command line tools package that can be downloaded from Xcode's ...


3

Assuming your serial times are in column A, the associated data in column B, the following formula =IF(INT($A1)=$A1,SUMIFS($B:$B,$A:$A,">="&$A1,$A:$A,"<"$A1+1),"") will display the sum behind the first integer time value in column C when input in C1 and extended to the column. If that is all you need, you are done. If, however, you need all ...


3

The Date and Time format depends on what you've specified in the Region and Language Control Panel applet. Run the following batch file (which assumes dd/mm/yyyy and hh:mm:ss) and modify the substring extraction (using the : and ~ characters) as required to get the proper parts from both Date and Time strings: @echo off cls echo Date format = %date% echo ...



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